Command Alkon’s Emily Branum Recognized As One of Birmingham Business Journal’s Women to Watch

Winners Comprised of Birmingham Women Who Have Distinguished Themselves in Their Companies, Their Industries, and The Community

Emily Branum

Emily Branum, Chief Strategy and Legal Officer at Command Alkon, has been named a one of the Birmingham Business Journal's Women to Watch for 2020.
Emily Branum, Chief Strategy and Legal Officer at Command Alkon, has been named a one of the Birmingham Business Journal’s Women to Watch for 2020.
Emily Branum, Chief Strategy and Legal Officer at Command Alkon, has been named a one of the Birmingham Business Journal’s Women to Watch for 2020.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Oct. 12, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Command Alkon, provider of the leading supplier collaboration platform for construction’s heavy work, announces that Emily Branum, Chief Strategy and Legal Officer at Command Alkon, was chosen as one of Birmingham Business Journal’s Women to Watch for 2020. This honorary list is comprised of record-breaking women who serve as key leaders in their companies or organizations. Additionally, this recognition highlights women who show potential to shape the future of Birmingham’s business world, and who are perfectly positioned to make a significant impact in the Birmingham business community.

“I am thrilled, but not surprised that Emily was selected for this honor,” said Phil Ramsey, CEO at Command Alkon. “Emily spearheads our leadership team when it comes to defining objectives to gain market share and maximize profitability, and how to execute plans to make those objectives achievable. Her leadership has been critical for our overall business growth, and we are so proud that one of our most valued leaders is receiving this well-deserved recognition.”

Emily is extremely active in the Birmingham community, serving as a member of The Rotary Club of Birmingham, as well as having chaired various fundraisers and served in leadership positions across numerous organizations, including: The Boards of Directors of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra; The Women’s Fund; The Junior League; Preschool Partners; Impact Alabama; and PARCA. Emily was recognized by the Birmingham

Amy Coney Barrett Confirmation Hearing Time, Schedule and Where to Watch

Today Amy Coney Barrett will attend a nomination hearing to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the U.S. It will be the first of a series of hearings over four days.



text: The witness table is set for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the first day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on October 12, 2020 in Washington, DC. Barrett was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who passed away in September.


© Erin Schaff – Pool /Getty Images
The witness table is set for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the first day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on October 12, 2020 in Washington, DC. Barrett was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who passed away in September.

According to the Committee on the Judiciary, Coney Barrett will speak at 9:00 a.m. local time in Washington, D.C. She can be watched live on the Judiciary’s website at this time.

The department’s website describes the Supreme Court as the United States’ highest court, with eight Associate Justices and one Chief Justice. These judges serve lifetime appointments on the Court in accordance with Article III of the U.S.’ Constitution.

According to the Committee on the Judiciary, in 211 years there have been just 17 Chief Justices and a total of 112 Justices that have served on the Supreme Court.

In the current presidency, President Donald Trump has nominated two associate judges to the Supreme Court. Neil M. Gorsuch was confirmed on April 7, 2017, replacing Judge Antonin Scalia, and Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed on October 6, 2018, to replace Judge Anthony Kennedy.

Amy Coney Barrett Notable Quotes On Catholic Faith And Politics, Abortion, Scalia And More

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Coney Barrett has been nominated to replace Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who passed away on September 18, 2020.

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Argentina is using facial recognition system that tracks child suspects, Human Rights Watch says

Publishing such information violates the Convention of the Rights of the Child, a U.N. agreement to which Argentina is a signatory, that says a child’s privacy should be respected at all stages of legal proceedings, said Hye Jung Han, a researcher and advocate in the children’s rights division at Human Rights Watch, who was the lead researcher on the report.

Argentina’s embassy in Washington did not respond immediately to a request for comment.

On a visit to Argentina in May 2019, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy warned the Argentine government that CONARC’s database contained 61 children. By that October Argentina’s justice ministry said there was no children’s data in CONARC. But the report contends the practice continued after the U.N. visit, with 25 additional children added to the database.

An HRW review of CONARC also saw that the public information about the children was peppered with inaccuracies.

“Some children appear multiple times,” José Miguel Vivanco, director of Human Rights Watch’s Americas division, wrote Friday in a public letter of concern to Argentine President Alberto Fernández. “There are blatant typographical errors, conflicting details, and multiple national ID numbers assigned to single individuals, raising the risk of mistaken matches. In one example, a 3-year-old is listed as being wanted for aggravated robbery.”

He added that the practice of using this information for facial recognition tracking also poses huge accuracy risks, given the higher rate of misidentification of children with such technology.

“Facial recognition technology has considerably higher error rates for children, in part because most algorithms have been trained, tested and tuned only on adult faces,” Vivanco wrote. “In addition, since children experience rapid and drastic changes in their facial features as they age, facial recognition algorithms also often fail to identify a child who is a

Here’s why Apple didn’t need FDA clearance for Apple Watch Series 6 blood oxygen sensing

While Apple went to great lengths to garner government approval for Apple Watch Series 4’s ECG feature, the company didn’t do the same for a blood oxygen monitoring function on Apple Watch Series 6. Here’s why.

When the ECG feature was introduced on the Apple Watch Series 4, Apple made note that it navigated a lengthy approval process to gain clearance from the Food and Drug Administration.

As is typical in the consumer electronics industry, the blood oxygen feature on the Series 6 doesn’t have similar certifications. According to The Verge, that’s because pulse oximeters, also known as blood oxygen monitors, are in a different FDA classification. As long as a company doesn’t claim that the devices can diagnose diseases, it can sell one in the U.S. with little oversight.

Generally, a company has to submit documentation to the FDA confirming the a blood oxygen sensing product works as well as other devices already on the market. But Apple, and other smartwatches and health-focused platforms, took another route. If a company claims a pulse oximeter is only used for general “wellness” or just for fun, it doesn’t need to go through any type of approval process.

“Apple Watch is already a powerful health tool with apps that measure heart rate and heart rhythm. And now adding blood oxygen brings in another valuable health measurement to users,” said Apple health chief Sumbul Ahmad Desai at the time of the device’s release.

The Verge notes that the FDA does get involved if a health feature seeks to influence the medical care that a user gets. Apple’s ECG feature falls into this category, since it serves the specific purpose of detecting and alerting users to unusual heart rhythms.

To even get the ECG cleared, Apple needed to submit documents and data