3,000 Amazon workers demand time off to vote: report

  • Amazon workers are demanding that the company give all US employees paid time off to vote in the upcoming election, NBC News reported Tuesday.
  • The petition, which gained more than 3,200 supporters, called for “a paid day/shift off that can be used anytime between now and Election Day on Nov 3” and “every year” in the future, according to NBC News.
  • “We have supplied all of our employees with information on how to register to vote, details of their local polling locations and how to request time off to vote,” an Amazon spokesperson told Business Insider.
  • Amazon and subsidiary Whole Foods employ nearly 1.4 million workers in the US.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Amazon workers, who have become increasingly vocal about the company’s policies during the pandemic, have a new demand: time off to vote in the upcoming US elections.

More than 3,200 Amazon workers have signed a petition circulating internally demanding the company give its entire US workforce a paid day or shift off to vote, NBC News reported Tuesday.

“We are less than a month away from the 2020 US election. I strongly urge the company to provide the entire US employee workforce with a paid day/shift off that can be used anytime between now and Election Day on Nov 3,” read the petition, which has been circulating on an internal Amazon support ticket system, according to NBC News.

The petition also demanded that the “additional day/shift off must be available to all employees every year,” NBC News reported.

Amazon and its subsidiary Whole Foods have 1,372,000 “front-line” workers across the US — accounting for roughly 1 of every 200 of the country’s voting-age population — but doesn’t currently guarantee them time off to vote in person.

“We have supplied all of our employees with

It’s Time For Startups To Use AI To Battle Tech Giants In Patent Wars

Technology giants such as Alibaba and IBM are eating startup innovators’ lunch. These behemoths are seeking to devour even more market share by publishing patents at unprecedented speed in emerging technologies such as blockchain.

As some of the richest companies on the planet, the corporations have the resources to manage the laborious search of existing patents and to overcome the outdated administrative hurdles so that they can file for intellectual property rights.

Patents are definitely old school. Patent laws started with the rise of the nation-state, so they began in the 18th century and were then fully developed in the 19th century. Some changes may have been made to reflect new technologies, but the basic patent laws haven’t evolved to meet the needs of the 21st century.

We’re patenting ideas based on today’s high-tech of artificial intelligence and blockchain with laws that were established centuries ago.

All this puts early-growth companies with game-changing inventions at a huge disadvantage.

Getting a patent is one of the most important strategic decisions a business can take. A patent not only protects a business idea from copycats, but it can also increase the value of the young company.

One of the reasons value increases is because a patent can block others from a market. Once a startup has it, they can make sure nobody else will enter that particular segment.

In a recent study, conducted by KISSPatent on patents in the specific field of blockchain, results showed an arms race between Alibaba and IBM. The Chinese e-commerce giant has published 10 times more blockchain-related patents than IBM in 2020, a year when blockchain patent numbers are generally skyrocketing. More blockchain-related patents were published in the first half of 2020 than in all of 2019, a year that had already seen three times more blockchain

Amy Coney Barrett Confirmation Hearing Time, Schedule and Where to Watch

Today Amy Coney Barrett will attend a nomination hearing to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the U.S. It will be the first of a series of hearings over four days.



text: The witness table is set for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the first day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on October 12, 2020 in Washington, DC. Barrett was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who passed away in September.


© Erin Schaff – Pool /Getty Images
The witness table is set for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the first day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on October 12, 2020 in Washington, DC. Barrett was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who passed away in September.

According to the Committee on the Judiciary, Coney Barrett will speak at 9:00 a.m. local time in Washington, D.C. She can be watched live on the Judiciary’s website at this time.

The department’s website describes the Supreme Court as the United States’ highest court, with eight Associate Justices and one Chief Justice. These judges serve lifetime appointments on the Court in accordance with Article III of the U.S.’ Constitution.

According to the Committee on the Judiciary, in 211 years there have been just 17 Chief Justices and a total of 112 Justices that have served on the Supreme Court.

In the current presidency, President Donald Trump has nominated two associate judges to the Supreme Court. Neil M. Gorsuch was confirmed on April 7, 2017, replacing Judge Antonin Scalia, and Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed on October 6, 2018, to replace Judge Anthony Kennedy.

Amy Coney Barrett Notable Quotes On Catholic Faith And Politics, Abortion, Scalia And More

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Coney Barrett has been nominated to replace Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who passed away on September 18, 2020.

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Elon Musk’s space internet gives Native American tribe access to high-speed broadband for first time

A remote Native American tribe is among the first users of Elon Musk’s Starlink space internet project after it connected to SpaceX’s constellation of satellites.



a sign on the side of a building


© Provided by The Independent


The Hoh Tribe in Washington State said Starlink’s high-speed broadband enabled remote learning and telehealth appointments during the coronavirus pandemic for the first time. 

“We’re very remote. The last eight years I felt like we’ve been paddling up river with a spoon and almost getting nowhere with getting internet to the reservation,” said Melvinjohn Ashue, vice chairman of the Hoh Tribe.

“It seemed like out of nowhere, SpaceX came up and just catapulted us into the 21st century.”

There are currently around 800 Starlink satellites in low-Earth orbit, offering internet connectivity to northern areas of the US and Canada. SpaceX eventually plans to launch tens of thousands more satellites to provide “near global coverage of the populated world by 2021”.

The Hoh Tribe were introduced to Starlink through the Washington State Department of Commerce, which sits within the current reach of the Starlink network.

It is one of several early testers of Starlink , with emergency responders in Washington State also recently using the network to set up a WiFi hotspot for residents of Malden after 80 per cent of the town was destroyed by wildfires.

The Hoh Tribe revealed that internet speeds prior to  Starlink ranged from between 0.3 and 0.7 megabits per second (Mbps) – a long way off the 100Mbps advertised by SpaceX.

Responding to a tweet from the

The early internet kept showing us the future, and we rolled our eyes every time

In Tales of the Early Internet, Mashable explores online life through 2007 — back before social media and the smartphone changed everything.


“The future is here, it’s just unevenly distributed,” William Gibson famously wrote in 2003. With the benefit of 2020 hindsight, we can add this about the era he was describing: the future was also unevenly believed. Even when it was right in front of us, we couldn’t see it through our assumptions. This was especially true of the things we were most passionate about. 

Everyone who was extremely online back in the late 1990s and early 2000s lost themselves to some new obsession when we got our first high-speed internet connection at home. Often it was an obsession that seemed somewhat illicit at the time, and utterly quaint now. For me, as for millions, that obsession was music — and acquiring it on Napster. 

This was spring of 2000; dotcom mania was in full swing, and I’d just moved to San Francisco to cover it for Time magazine. The moment Pacific Bell hooked up my first DSL line, I couldn’t resist downloading the bad boy of music sharing — we’d just put Napster on the cover — and soon saw what the fuss was about. More than 30 million people freely sharing music collections on the same server: This was something new in the world. It was the first cultural bazaar where everything was available, instant and free. One night I asked my visiting British dad to name a tune it might not have. 

“‘My Old Man’s a Dustman’ by Lonnie Donegan,” he replied gruffly, almost like he regretted making the challenge too hard. He scoffed at the likelihood of finding it. Ping! Donegan downloaded 30 seconds later. 

WATCH: Revisiting the website that shaped the internet

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