U.S. Department Of Justice Reveals Growing Bitcoin And Crypto National Security Threat Could Herald ‘Oncoming Storm’

Bitcoin and cryptocurrency use by terrorists, rogue nations and other criminals has grown in recent years—with high-profile attacks drawing international attention.

The illicit use of bitcoin and cryptocurrency ranges from money laundering and tax evasion to extortion, with cyber criminals increasingly demanding bitcoin and crypto payments in ransomware attacks on computer systems.

Now, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has warned the emergence of bitcoin and similar cryptocurrencies is a growing threat to U.S. national security, with the attorney general William Barr’s Cyber-Digital Task Force calling it the “first raindrops of an oncoming storm.”

MORE FROM FORBESNeither Trump Nor Biden Will Help The U.S. Dollar, Warns Early Facebook Exec-Calls Bitcoin An ‘Insurance Policy’

“Current terrorist use of cryptocurrency may represent the first raindrops of an oncoming storm of expanded use,” the Cyber-Digital Task Force said in a report that found bitcoin and cryptocurrencies pose an emerging challenge to law enforcement activities. “Cryptocurrency also provides bad actors and rogue nation states with the means to earn profits.”

The DOJ report, titled Cryptocurrency: An Enforcement Framework and published by the Attorney General’s Cyber-Digital Task Force last week, found bitcoin and cryptocurrencies have been used to support terrorism, purchase illicit items, conduct blackmail and extortion, cryptojacking and launder funds.

Investigators also said bitcoin and cryptocurrencies could be “detrimental to the safety and stability of the international financial system.”

The response of U.S. and international law enforcement has been held back by inconsistent regulation country-to-country. The DOJ has spent the last two years determining how best to address these issues, according to the document that “outlines the Department’s response strategies.”

MORE FROM FORBES‘High Risk’ Warning: A Major

Can This New Android Threat Brick Your Phone When You Answer A Call?

Microsoft recently published a security blog that warned about a sophisticated new ransomware variant. Not, as you might expect, ransomware that impacts users of the Windows operating system, though. Nope, instead, this was a warning for Android users.

The discovery of a context-aware machine learning code module in the MalLocker.B certainly deserves the sophisticated tag. However, that module has yet to be activated, and more of that in a moment. What has grabbed the attention of Android users who have read the various reports online, it would seem, is the fact that MalLocker.B can effectively brick phones only with a press of the home button when answering a call. But how true is that, and how worried should Android smartphone users actually be?

First things first, this is a fascinating and highly detailed bit of technical blogging from the Microsoft security folk. As such, that is to be welcomed, as is all information that helps us understand how threats, including ransomware, are evolving. Most users, however, will not have read that report for the very same reason: it’s a technical deep dive. That’s a shame, but not unsurprising. The job of journalists and reporters in the information security space is to explain such highly technical revelations in a way that can be absorbed by almost anyone regardless of their level of technical understanding.

On the whole, I think ‘we’ do a pretty decent job of that, and the MalLocker.B reporting is no exception. Apart from one thing: my inbox would suggest that many readers are coming away with the idea that their Android smartphones are in danger of being bricked simply because they have pressed the home button in response to an incoming call. That is

ZeroFOX acquires Cyveillance threat intelligence business from LookingGlass

ZeroFOX has acquired LookingGlass Cyber Solutions’ Cyveillance threat intelligence business. 

Announced on Tuesday, the deal is designed to merge the ZeroFOX Digital Risk Protection Platform and Cyveillance’s threat intelligence data trove and dark web intelligence capabilities. 

ZeroFOX says that snapping up the business, previously a subsidiary of LookingGlass, is a strategic move to push the company up the enterprise threat intelligence and protection roster on a global scale.

See also: Leaders of ‘notorious’ Team Xecuter game piracy, homebrew group arrested

Financial details were not disclosed. 

Founded in 1997 and headquartered in Reston, Virginia, Cyveillance was previously acquired by LookingGlass in 2015. 

The company provides clients with online data source analysis and monitoring, including a digital risk protection service, a “data lake” repository containing over two decades’ worth of threat intelligence, open source security projects, as well as investigation and forensics offerings.

“Our merger with the Cyveillance team fulfills our strategic vision of accelerating our position as the definitive worldwide leader in Digital Risk Protection,” said James Foster, ZeroFOX CEO. 

CNET: Amazon doubles down on Echo home security. What to know

Once the merger completes, Gilman Louie, Executive Chairman of LookingGlass, will be joining the ZeroFOX board of directors. 

Existing Cyveillance customers will continue to receive their services as normal and will also be offered access to ZeroFOX solutions. 

“To accelerate the innovation and service delivery for organizations worldwide who depend on us to protect their critical assets, data and accounts on public platforms, we are employing acquisitions as multipliers in our go-forward strategy,” ZeroFOX added. 

The purchase of Cyveillance is ZeroFOX’s first acquisition since its founding in 2013. The company has previously raised over $154 million through multiple investment rounds. 

TechRepublic: How to boost the effectiveness of your cybersecurity operations

Last week, Imperva acquired database security firm jSonar. While financial

BISD, Facebook investigating social media threat against teacher

Beaumont ISD Police are investigating after a number of threats were sent to a teacher through anonymous Facebook accounts demanding them to “stop sending work.”

BISD spokesperson Hannah LeTulle confirmed that the district was investigating the matter, but did not provide additional details.

“The district takes any and all threats seriously and is doing so in this situation,” LeTulle said in a statement to The Enterprise, “The matter is under current investigation with the BISD Police Department.”

The messages were sent from at least three separate accounts with fake names including a character from the cartoon “Naruto,” and another with a phrase tied the hacking activist group Anonymous.


A Facebook spokesperson said the accounts have been deactivated for violating the social network’s policies prohibiting fake accounts, and that the company is investigating the matter.

None of the accounts had profile pictures or “about” information prior to their deactivation.

In one of the messages, which was reviewed by The Enterprise, a photo showing a cylindrical device covered in black tape being held by a hand with a silver chain on the wrist was sent to the teacher.

“Waiting at your door,” a message with the photo said.

The teacher confirmed to The Enterprise that the police were handling the situation, but also declined to provide any more details pending the results.

BISD and other area schools received a growing number of threats at the end of the last school year prior to the coronavirus shutdowns, prompting several districts to cancel school for a number of days. After two threats in one week in March, BISD Superintendent Shannon Allen called on parents to discuss with their children the consequences of making threats.

BISD has contracted with an artificial intelligence software company

Trump’s targeting of Black voters on Facebook in 2016 shows microtargeting is a threat to democracy, experts warn

  • Channel 4 on Monday revealed a leaked cache of data from the Trump 2016 presidential campaign.
  • The data showed how the campaign microtargeted people on Facebook, and labelled a particular group of users as targets for “deterrence” from voting. This group was disproportionately made up of Black users.
  • Experts told Business Insider the report highlights the threat that microtargeting on a vast platform like Facebook’s poses towards democratic elections.
  • “Facebook talks a lot about bad actors misusing its platform, but the truth is that the biggest bad actor on Facebook is Facebook,” one said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The now-defunct Cambridge Analytica entered the news cycle once again on Monday, four years after its name became synonymous with the huge data scandal that changed the tech landscape forever.

UK broadcaster Channel 4 obtained a leaked data cache from the Trump 2016 presidential campaign which contained the data of 200 million Americans’ Facebook accounts.

The data demonstrated the Trump campaign’s strategy for categorizing different types of users to target them with content and ads on Facebook, a process known as microtargeting. Microtargeting is broadly not regulated in the US.

In one instance, Trump’s campaign labeled a group of users “deterrence”, who the campaign tried to dissuade from voting.

This group was overwhelmingly comprised of Black people. While Black users made up only 13% of the total dataset, they comprised nearly a third of users in the “deterrence” group — 3.5 million in total.

Included in the data obtained by Channel 4 was an ad made by Cambridge Analytica targeted at Black Americans and which attacked Hillary Clinton for remarks she made in 1996 about “superpredators.” 

The Trump campaign has dismissed the Channel 4 report as “fake news.”

While the efficacy of Cambridge Analytica’s tactics back in 2016 remain