Ocreative Marks the Launch of Their New Website with Ten More International Creative & Marketing Awards

HARTLAND, Wis., Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — To earmark the launch of their new website, Ocreative, an integrated marketing agency, also announced they’ve been generously recognized by the Academy of Interactive & Visual Arts (AIVA) for their outstanding work in traditional and digital marketing. With over 6,000 entries from companies and agencies spanning the globe, the Communicator Awards are one of largest awards of its kind in the world.

“We have the opportunity to work with some really incredible, innovative clients,” says Founder and Chief Creative Officer, Andrea Koeppel. “They trust us with their business, and we work hard to honor their vision, goals, and messaging with top-tier work.”

Working closely with clients and creating an environment of transparency and open communication are paramount to Ocreative’s success, she explained. So much so, that they chose to center their new website around their client relationship philosophy. “We really wanted to let businesses and organizations of all sizes know that cutting-edge web design and development and inventive marketing are accessible,” Koeppel continued. “We want to educate and guide and we’re thrilled that organizations like AIVA choose to highlight our work. It lets us know we’re always moving in the right direction and gives our clients confidence and peace of mind.”

Ocreative’s new website boasts a detailed series of case studies in their portfolio to help potential and existing clients get a better handle on the agency’s marketing experience and capabilities. “We want to show people how marketing strategies can work and provide real outcomes,” Koeppel said “But we really wanted our creative team to run with it, no holds barred. Let’s really show them what’s possible.” The new website balances vibrant colors, graphics, and animation with real photos of their team and office, located in Hartland, WI.

Alongside their

Ten Reasons Why Big Firms Stick With Obsolete Management (Part 2)

Following the first five of Ten Reasons Why Big Firms Stick With 20th Century Management, here are five more reasons:

1. The Transition To 21st Century Management Is Hard Work

Stopping the momentum of the giant flywheel of 20th Century management and turning it into something more agile can involve a lot of work. Everything in 21st Century management is the opposite of 20th Century management.

The goal of the firm is now to create a continuous stream of value for customers and users. Making money is the result, not the goal. This goal requires a different structure of work to enable the full talents of those doing the work, often through small self-organizing teams working in short cycles, focused tightly on delivering value for customers. Instead of a steep vertical hierarchy of authority, there is a flat network or hierarchy of competence, in which ideas can  come from anywhere.

These three principles in turn require radically different processes. Leadership has to be inspirational rather transactional, and, given the distributed nature of work, it is required throughout the organization. Strategy tends to include not only coping with competition but also creating new businesses that attract new customers. Innovation encompasses systematic efforts to find new needs and new ways of meeting them, including the creation of interactive ecosystems. Sales and marketing involve making a real difference in the lives of customers and users. Given the new role of talent, people management must attract and enable the talent required to deliver value to customers. Because the firm operates as a network of teams tightly focused on creating customer value, the budget typically reflects decisions already taken in strategy; there

Ten Reasons Why Big Firms Stick With Obsolete Management

One of the great puzzles of the corporate world is why big corporations are still being run on obsolete 20th Century management principles when there is an obvious better alternative—21st Century management—that is producing unprecedented financial returns and market capitalizations.

“Most [firms] today are run on the basis of ‘legacy’ management systems that have become obsolete,” writes Menlo College professor Annika Steiber in The Silicon Valley Model. But why?

Even though 20th Century management is a coherent and consistent way of running a company, it is an increasingly poor fit with today’s fast-moving customer-driven marketplace. It has difficulty changing direction. It lacks agility. Here are ten reasons why 20th Century management still dominates.

1.    20th Century Management Operates As An Unstoppable Flywheel

Since 1970, 20th Century management has been preoccupied with a single-minded goal—to maximize shareholder value. The goal leads to a very specific way of running the company. Because the goal is uninspiring to those doing the work, workers need to be closely monitored. So, the goal leads inexorably to a structure of work that is bureaucratic—individuals reporting to bosses—and the organizational dynamic of a top-down hierarchy of authority, as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1

These three 20th Century principles—goal, structure of work, and firm dynamic—in turn lead inexorably to the familiar set of 20th Century corporate processes. Thus leadership has to come from the top because it is only the top that is deeply committed to those principles; as a result, leadership is inevitably transactional rather than transformational: it has to resort to carrots and sticks, rather than inspiration. Strategy inevitably turns into

Gambling Website Says Lovie Smith’s Seat Hottest In Big Ten

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Lovie Smith leads the way in the gambling proposition bet category no coach ever wants anything to do with.

The Fighting Illini head coach enters his fifth season as the coach with the hottest seat in the Big Ten Conference according to the gambling website SportsBetting.ag.

Smith, who is 15-34 in four years at Illinois, is coming off a 2019 season where he led Illinois to the Redbox Bowl, the program’s first bowl in five years. The 2019 season included wins at Purdue, Michigan State and upset home win against then-No. 6 Wisconsin where the Illini entered the day as a 30-point underdog before James McCourt’s 39-yard field goal as time expired sent fans rushing to the Memorial Stadium field in one of the greatest Homecoming scenes in school history.

Illinois Fighting Illini head coach Lovie Smith looks on during the second half of a 2017 game against the Minnesota Golden Gophers at TCF Bank Stadium.
Lovie Smith is 15-34 in four years at Illinois but is coming off a 2019 season where he led Illinois to the Redbox Bowl, the program’s first bowl in five years.Jesse Johnson/USA TODAY Sports

NOTE: Smith’s contract has a buyout of $2 million if he’s released after this season along with whatever is remaining on his $4 million salary for that year. Early this month, Illinois athletics director Josh Whitman had said the school’s athletics department could lose at least $20 million this fiscal year but it is unknown how much of that could be negated now that the Big Ten Conference has decided to get a portion of the television money from its broadcast partners to play a 2020 fall football season.

Below you will find odds for the first head coach fired in the Atlantic Coast Conference, Big Ten, Big 12 Conference and Southeastern Conference. Odds do not take into account a coach resigning or retiring.

First Big Ten head coach fired

Name