Juice WRLD’s Mom Launches Website To Help Fans Struggling With Mental Health Issues

(AllHipHop News) 

Carmela Wallace, mother of late rapper Juice WRLD, opened up about her late son’s “struggles with addiction, anxiety, and depression” to mark World Mental Health Day 2020.

In the letter, Wallace writes of the “Lucid Dreams” star, real name Jarad Anthony Higgins: “I think he felt comfortable being honest with me because I never judged him. I recognized that what Jarad was dealing with was a disease and I know he truly wanted to be free from the demons that tormented him.

“As a parent, I believed early on and supported Jarad having access to counseling,” she admitted. “I encouraged him to always share his feelings.”

Juice WRLD died on December 8th, 2019 at the age of 21. His death was ruled an accidental overdose “as a result of oxycodone and codeine toxicity.”

In his memory, Wallace also revealed that she has established a new website, Live Free 999, in the hopes that it will be “a resource to those that are struggling”.

“My message to the parents and children is simple. You do not have to suffer alone. You do not have to be ashamed of your mental health struggles. There is help. There is a way out,” she continued.

“If we can help even one Mother and their son or daughter through our work here, Jarad’s death will have meaning and his positive, loving, creative spirit will endure.”

For more information on Wallace’s new venture, visit https://livefree999.org/.

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The Pentagon Is Powerful, But It Is Struggling To Kill The F-35’s Software Bugs

Here’s What You Need To Remember: While the F-35 continues to be an advanced fighter jet, there are times when it is clear that upgrading an old war bird like the B-52 is often a lot easier than working out the bugs in what should be a state-of-the-art fighter jet.

Introduced in the 1950s, the B-52 Stratofortress has remained in service thanks in part to the numerous upgrades it has received over the years. In fact, because it was introduced before the days of advanced computers, the B-52 has actually been at times much easier to update than more modern aircraft.

By contrast, the U.S. military’s highly advanced F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, which was developed with the latest and greatest aviation computer systems and software, has had no shortage of problems and bugs to work out, while upgrades have been anything but easy.

ALIS In:

Since its introduction, the F-35s ground-based ALIS logistical system, intended to streamline reporting and implement predictive maintenance, has for years remained buggy to the point of “dysfunctionality” – requiring constant manual inputs and workarounds when automated systems failed to do what they were supposed to do.

The problem with software has been so great that earlier this year, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) even warned that the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program, despite producing more aircraft and at negotiated lower prices in 2019, is not meeting the standards that the aircraft’s customers might have expected.

The good news is that the F-35’s next tech upgrade could address many of the issues, but the bad news is that it could also just add billions more to the cost of the aircraft Ars Technica reported this week.

Third Time’s the Charm:

The Tech Refresh 3 program for the fifth-generation stealth fighter will include an upgrade of