Apple may stop shipping power adapters with iPhone SE, other current devices

Apple is expected to ship new “iPhone 12” models without an AC power adapter, but it could also do the same for previously released devices like the iPhone SE.

The lack of a charging brick in the box is said to be a cost-saving move for this year’s iPhone models. Apple also stopped shipping power adapters with the Apple Watch Series 6, citing environmental reasons.

In a tweet on Tuesday, Bloomberg’s Mark Gurman suggested that the Cupertino tech giant would also stop shipping charging bricks with previously released iPhone models that “it’ll keep selling.”

Although Gurman doesn’t specify, his prediction suggests that Apple will — or already has — change the packaging for current iPhone models to reflect the absence of the charging accessory.

The Bloomberg reporter specified that Apple would nix the power adapter for the iPhone SE, as well as other pre-“iPhone 12” models that it’ll continue selling as part of its updated lineup. At this point, it isn’t clear which current iPhone models will continue to be sold alongside the updated “iPhone 12” lineup besides the iPhone SE.

Additionally, it’s unclear if Gurman’s prediction is simply a guess or actually based on actual leaked information. Gurman didn’t say whether he received the idea from an outside source.

Apple has long been rumored to be pivoting toward wireless charging for its flagship iPhone devices, and analyst Ming-Chi Kuo has forecast that the company could switch to a “completely wireless experience” by 2021. Apple is also rumored to be developing some type of small wireless charging adapter in lieu of AirPower.

The

Privacy push could stop some annoying website pop-ups and online tracking

If you’re sick of websites tracking you and just as frustrated with website pop-ups prompting you to dig through obscure browser cookie settings — good news. An alliance including web publishers and browser makers has developed technology to stop websites from selling or sharing the data they gather about you, and you can try it now.



a piece of paper: Angela Lang/CNET


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Angela Lang/CNET

If the effort succeeds, a single setting in your browser could forbid website publishers from selling your data — at least if you live in California. And unlike a related effort years ago called Do Not Track, this one could have legal teeth.

Allies include publishers like The New York Times and Washington Post and browser makers Brave and Mozilla . One way to try it is with the Nightly test version of Brave, the browser maker said. Another is by installing DuckDuckGo’s mobile browser or desktop browser extension, the privacy-centric search engine said. “We hope [Global Privacy Control] will become a widely adopted standard,” DuckDuckGo said in a tweet.



a piece of paper: In at least 10 schools, Inpixon has installed radio frequency scanners to pull data from phone signals like Bluetooth and Wi-Fi to keep track of students.


© Angela Lang/CNET

In at least 10 schools, Inpixon has installed radio frequency scanners to pull data from phone signals like Bluetooth and Wi-Fi to keep track of students.


The Global Privacy Control project dovetails with two recent privacy laws. The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the earlier Global Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in Europe are why so many websites make you wrestle with settings for cookies. Those small text files are key to how many websites track your online activity.

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One provision of the CCPA allows for a single switch you could set in your browser, through the browser itself or a

PlayStation Store will reportedly stop selling PS3, PSP and Vita games this month

001-playstation-5.png

The PS5 consoles are set to appear next month.


Sony

The PlayStation 5 is scheduled to arrive in the US in November, and in anticipation of the event, Sony will stop selling PlayStation 3, PSP or Vita games in the web and mobile PlayStation Store, EuroGamer reported Friday.

According to the report, Sony has notified its development partners that the web and mobile versions of the PlayStation Store will stop selling PlayStation 3, PSP or Vita games timed with a relaunch of the store on Oct. 19 and ahead of the PS5 launch in November.

Among the items Sony will remove are PlayStation 3 games and add-ons, PSP games and add-ons, PlayStation Vita games and add-ons, apps, themes and avatars. The items will still be available in the PlayStation store you access directly from a PS3 or PS Vita, EuroGamer said.

The online store will reportedly turn over Oct. 19, with the mobile store changing Oct. 28.

Sony didn’t respond to a request to comment.

Preorders for the PS5 consoles have been selling out, but we already know which games will be available on day one when the console arrives Nov. 12.

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French Consumers Encouraged to Stop Spending on New Smartphones

(Bloomberg) — France is preparing incentives for consumers to shift spending habits to used electronics, in an attempt to lower the impact on the environment and provide a boost to local ecommerce startups.



a person holding a bag and walking on a sidewalk: A pedestrian uses a smartphone while wearing a protective face mask outside the LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton SE luxury goods store in Place Vendome, in Paris, France, on Tuesday, March 10, 2020. The euro-area economy may be headed for its first recession in seven years as the coronavirus outbreak takes an increasing toll on businesses and consumer confidence.


© Bloomberg
A pedestrian uses a smartphone while wearing a protective face mask outside the LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton SE luxury goods store in Place Vendome, in Paris, France, on Tuesday, March 10, 2020. The euro-area economy may be headed for its first recession in seven years as the coronavirus outbreak takes an increasing toll on businesses and consumer confidence.

The government said it will deploy a scoring system on devices’ re-usability from January, and will set aside 21 million euros ($25 million) from its stimulus plan to fund re-usability startups and projects.

Environment minister Barbara Pompili and her colleague for Digital Affairs, Cedric O, told Bloomberg that the government is in talks to boost second-hand purchasing, but didn’t detail the plans which are still being finalized. O said a new form of tax on goods was unlikely because companies would shift the cost on consumers.



a person standing in front of a table: A customer tries a Redmi Note 5 display model smartphone inside a Xiaomi Corp. store in Paris, France, on Friday, May 25, 2018. Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi opened it's first store in Paris and plans for more shops in France, Spain and Italy, testing the appetite of consumers in developed markets as its executives consider a U.S. expansion.


© Bloomberg
A customer tries a Redmi Note 5 display model smartphone inside a Xiaomi Corp. store in Paris, France, on Friday, May 25, 2018. Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi opened it’s first store in Paris and plans for more shops in France, Spain and Italy, testing the appetite of consumers in developed markets as its executives consider a U.S. expansion.

Read More: Porsche, Ferrari Cars Face $59,000 Gas Guzzlers Tax in France

“We want to incite people who want to buy a handset to think first about refurbished ones,” Pompili said.

Selling refurbished handsets has been a long-standing business. Both Apple Inc. and Samsung offer second-hand phones on their websites, and the global market for used smartphones is expected to

Privacy push could stop some annoying website popups and online tracking

Companies want to know what you do online.

Angela Lang/CNET

If you’re sick of websites tracking you and just as frustrated with website pop-ups prompting you to dig through obscure browser cookie settings — good news. An alliance including web publishers and browser makers has developed technology to stop websites from selling or sharing the data they gather about you, and you can try it now.

If the effort succeeds, a single setting in your browser could forbid website publishers from selling your data — at least if you live in California. And unlike a related effort years ago called Do Not Track, this one could have legal teeth.

Allies include publishers like The New York Times and Washington Post and browser makers Brave and Mozilla. One way to try it is with the Nightly test version of Brave, the browser maker said. Another is by installing DuckDuckGo’s mobile browser or desktop browser extension, the privacy-centric search engine said. “We hope [Global Privacy Control] will become a widely-adopted standard,” DuckDuckGo said in a tweet.

The Global Privacy Control project dovetails with two recent privacy laws. The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the earlier Global Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in Europe are why so many websites make you wrestle with settings for cookies. Those small text files are key to how many websites track your online activity.

One provision of the CCPA allows for a single switch you could set in your browser, through the browser itself or a browser extension, that would tell every website what you wanted and sweep away those dialog boxes. That’s what the alliance members have built, and they’re working to make it legally binding under the CCPA so websites