The Ultimate Guide To Starting A Side Hustle Part 6: Marketing

When you are starting a side hustle, one of the most important things you can do for your business is market. But marketing can get pretty out of control if not planned strategically. The first thing you need to do is make sure your marketing is synergistic with your sales plan. 

Years ago, I worked for an ad agency in San Diego. Out of the blue someone called our office and asked to speak to the media buyer – which was me. I answered the call and it was a local plumber, who serviced commercial buildings and businesses. He wanted to know if we could create an ad for his business to shine on the side of building at night – because he saw this done in Las Vegas the weekend before and thought it was clever. 

So I asked him, “This particular ad would only be seen during evening hours – half of each day, with very little exposure during the middle of the night, correct?”

“Uh, yeah, I guess so,” he replied.

I then asked, “Do you know how many of your prospects – business owners or commercial property managers – drive past this particular building during evening hours to see it?” 

“Um, no,” he said.

“Are there other media outlets that your prospect might consume that isn’t just shown overnight, in one spot in town and has more data we could look at?” I asked. 

“Probably. I’ll call you back.” 

Not surprising, but he never called back. What he thought was a clever marketing tactic was completely out of line for his business and would be a total waste of his marketing dollars. It’s wildly important that your marketing support your sales efforts when you have a side hustle. 

Typically when starting out marketing dollars are sparse,

Apple is starting to ship devices directly from its stores

Apple is shifting how it ships devices to consumers: instead of sending out all of its hardware products directly from China or from local warehouses, the company is now going to use its network of Apple Stores as de-facto fulfillment centers, shipping products directly from the stores to get to customers faster.



a tall building in a city


The change, Bloomberg reports, will use Apple’s nearly 300 stores in the US and Canada to speed up local delivery for customers within 100 miles of a store. The company has already apparently started using the new system with several stores earlier this year, but the broader rollout is coming just ahead of Apple’s upcoming iPhone launch next week (which is already taking place later than usual).

The shift is largely an internal one, according to Bloomberg — so customers won’t be able to choose the store from which their devices ship. But using retail stores to facilitate faster shipping to customers could help get new iPhones in people’s hands that much faster, especially at a time when those stores are seeing far less in-person traffic (or are closed altogether) due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

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Windows on Arm will support a lot more apps starting next month

Microsoft Edge Chromium Surface Pro X

  • Microsoft has announced that 64-bit app emulation is coming to Windows on Arm next month.
  • The feature will be offered to consumers in the Windows Insider program first.
  • It allows users to run more legacy 64-bit Windows apps, such as games and editing tools.

The first Windows on Arm laptops and convertibles were released in 2018, offering Windows 10 on power-efficient Arm chips rather than legacy x64 silicon from Intel and AMD. Microsoft used emulation to allow 32-bit legacy apps to still run on Windows on Arm, but 64-bit app emulation hasn’t been possible until now.

Now, the Redmond company has announced (h/t: XDA-Developers) that it will indeed bring 64-bit app emulation to Windows on Arm next month. The company says users in the Windows Insider program will get the feature first, so users at large can expect to get it some time thereafter.

This was one of the biggest omissions from Windows on Arm up until now, as it meant that 64-bit only legacy apps such as several Adobe creative apps and numerous games simply wouldn’t work on these machines (although 64-bit Arm apps still worked). So those hoping to use Adobe Premiere Pro CS5, the 64-bit version of Photoshop, or wanting to play more games via Steam can theoretically do so, although performance, polish and power consumption remains to be seen.

There’s still more room for improvement though, especially when it comes to driver support on the Arm-powered platform. More specifically, Microsoft previously noted that drivers for hardware, games, and apps will only work if they’re designed for Windows on Arm. In other words, those reliant on legacy peripherals seem to be largely out of luck for now. But hopefully we see developments in this regard if Microsoft isn’t already focusing on this issue.

Nevertheless, our own

Google to Collect 30% Cut on In-App Purchases Starting in 2021

Taking a page out of Apple’s  (AAPL) – Get Report book, Google will begin more strictly enforcing rules that require developers to use Google’s  (GOOGL) – Get Report payment system for in-app purchases. 

Google announced the change on its Android developer blog on Monday, describing it as a clarification of Google’s existing rules on in-app purchases. Google had an existing policy requiring developers to use Google’s billing system, but the policy had been loosely enforced. 

“We’ve always required developers who distribute their apps on Play to use Google Play’s billing system if they offer in-app purchases of digital goods, and pay a service fee from a percentage of the purchase,” wrote Sameer Samat, VP of product management at Android. “We only collect a service fee if the developer charges users to download their app or they sell in-app digital items, and we think that is fair. Not only does this approach allow us to continuously reinvest in the platform, this business model aligns our success directly with the success of developers.” 

The changes are applicable to less than 3% of developers, Samat wrote, and developers will have until September 2021 to complete any needed updates to integrate their apps with Google’s billing. 

Like Apple, Google takes a 30% cut of payments made through its Google Play store. And the platform fees have been the subject to growing scrutiny alongside antitrust investigations of Apple, Google and other Internet firms.

Last week, Apple said that it will temporarily waive its 30% commission on Facebook paid events, a feature Facebook introduced in August allowing small businesses — hard hit by Covid-19 shutdowns — to set up paid virtual events, amid an ongoing spat between the two tech giants. 

Apple is also locked in a legal battle with Epic Games,