SpaceX’s Starlink Set To Begin Public Beta. Will It Deliver?

[10/13/2020] Starlink Preps Public Beta For Parts Of U.S & Canada

Last week, Elon Musk indicated that SpaceX’s satellite-based Internet business, Starlink, had launched enough satellites to start public beta services in parts of the northern U.S. and southern Canada. With the launch of about 60 Starlink satellites last Tuesday, SpaceX will have a total of over 770 satellites in orbit. While the company should be able to offer speeds of about 100 Mbps, it plans to launch thousands of more satellites, enabling Starlink to provide Internet at speeds of as much as 1 Gbps to much of the populated world. The success of Starlink will be crucial to SpaceX, which has thus far focused on the relatively niche space launch services business. If Starlink Internet service is able to provide a compelling value proposition compared to traditional broadband in terms of both pricing and performance, SpaceX could have a winner on its hands. Below, we provide a scenario of how Starlink could be worth about $30 billion by 2025.

[2/12/2020] Starlink Valuation: What Could SpaceX’s Starlink Service Be Worth?

SpaceX recently indicated that it could spin off and pursue an IPO for its satellite-based Internet business, Starlink. The Starlink service, which is likely to see operations begin later this year, aims to provide high-speed Internet globally in a cost-effective manner by leveraging a constellation of several thousand satellites. While SpaceX has not given a definitive timeline for an

SpaceX Starlink internet service gearing up for public beta soon, says Elon Musk

After a series of delays due to unfavourable weather conditions, the latest SpaceX Starlink mission launched last week on Tuesday, Oct. 6, at 7:29 a.m. PDT. This added 60 more satellites that are intended to beam down high-speed internet from space. This brings the total number of low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellites from the privately-owned space firm to almost 800. It will not end just yet, as more are planned to go up in the future. The service is expected to go online for its beta testing phase soon.



a sign lit up at night: SpaceX Starlink satellites pass over Leiden


© Photo: Marco Langbroek / Marco Langbroek
SpaceX Starlink satellites pass over Leiden

Elon Musk said, “Once these satellites reach their target position, we will be able to roll out a fairly wide public beta in northern US and hopefully southern Canada.” This is just the initial phase, as SpaceX plans to increase coverage moving forward to eventually provide a constellation that can deliver reliable broadband internet services across the globe, reports ZDNet. He added: “Other countries to follow as soon as we receive regulatory approval.”

Perhaps the most recent test of its capabilities was last month in the wake of the devastating wildfires that destroyed local communications infrastructure. Last month, the residents and emergency responders in the town of Malden in Washington were able to use Wi-Fi services provided by SpaceX Starlink satellites at the time. Musk noted that it was a special case scenario wherein it was able to help folks who needed internet connectivity given the situation.

Originally, the target speeds were set at approximately 100 megabits per second. Nevertheless, this is expected to improve as the satellite constellation grows later on. The official website states: “With performance that far surpasses that of traditional satellite internet, and a global network unbounded by ground infrastructure limitations, Starlink will deliver high-speed

SpaceX Starlink Internet ‘Catapulted Us Into the 21st Century,’ Native American Tribe Says

A Native American tribe in a remote part of Washington has been “catapulted into the 21st century” after getting SpaceX’s Starlink internet.

SpaceX Is Trying To Launch 60 Starlink Internet Satellites Into Space

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The Hoh Tribe, which is based on the Pacific coast, roughly 23 miles south of the town of Forks, said on Twitter this week it was now receiving a high-speed connection from the constellation of satellites blasted into orbit by Elon Musk’s company.

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“What a difference high-speed internet can make. Our children can participate in remote learning, residents can access healthcare. We felt like we’d been paddling up-river with a spoon… SpaceX Starlink made it happen overnight,” it tweeted Wednesday.

Starlink is an ongoing SpaceX project creating a global network of satellites capable of beaming broadband internet to areas with unreliable or unavailable access.

Earlier this week, as the company shot 60 more satellites into space onboard a Falcon 9 rocket, Musk teased tests in the U.S. and Canada were closer than ever. The company said “near-global coverage of the populated world” could be reached by 2021.

While not for the wider public, some trials have begun. Responding to the Hoh tribe’s tweet this week, the billionaire SpaceX boss wrote back: “You’re most welcome!”

It remains unclear what speed the tribe was now receiving from Starlink, but it revealed in a separate tweet that its previous capacity had been between 0.3 and 0.7 megabits per second (Mbps). For context, SpaceX has previously said its Starlink tests showed “super low latency and download speeds greater than 100 Mbps,” which is enough to “stream multiple HD movies at once and still have bandwidth to spare.”

The director of the Washington Department of

Elon Musk says Starlink now has enough satellites in orbit to launch a public beta of its high-speed internet service

  • Elon Musk said on Tuesday that SpaceX’s internet satellite project, Starlink, had launched enough satellites for its public beta.
  • Once the most recently launched satellites are in position, the company will roll out a “fairly wide public beta” in the northern US and southern Canada, Musk tweeted.
  • Starlink’s goal is to put a constellation of satellites into orbit that can beam high-speed internet to remote parts of Earth.

Elon Musk’s goal of beaming high-speed internet to remote parts of Earth using orbiting satellites just got a step closer to reality.

SpaceX on Tuesday launched a batch of 60 Starlink satellites, bringing the total number in orbit to more than 700, according to Ars Technica. Musk, SpaceX’s CEO, said this was enough for a public beta.

“Once these satellites reach their target position, we will be able to roll out a fairly wide public beta in northern US & hopefully southern Canada,” he tweeted after the launch.

This beta would include the Detroit metro area and Ann Arbor, Michigan, he said in response to a question.

“Other countries to follow as soon as we receive regulatory approval,” he added.

Musk did not say exactly when the satellites were expected to reach their “target position,” and Jonathan McDowell, an astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told Ars Technica that they might not be in place until February.

Musk said in April that a public beta for the service would be up and running in the fall. He also said in May 2019 that a commercially viable “initial” version of Starlink’s service for the US would be possible with 400 satellites, while 800 would be enough for “significant” global coverage.

So it’s possible, as Ars Technica’s report noted, that the public beta will get underway

Musk: SpaceX’s Starlink has enough orbiting satellites for public beta

  • Elon Musk said Tuesday that SpaceX’s internet satellite project, Starlink, has now launched enough satellites for its public beta.
  • Musk tweeted that once the most-recently launched satellites are in position, the company will roll out a “fairly wide public beta” in the northern US and southern Canada.
  • The goal of Starlink is to put a constellation of satellites into orbit that can beam high-speed internet to remote parts of the Earth.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Elon Musk’s goal of beaming high-speed internet to remote parts of the Earth using orbiting satellites just got a step closer to reality.

SpaceX on Tuesday successfully launched a batch of 60 satellites, bringing the total number of Starlink satellites in orbit to more than 700, per Ars Technica. Musk, SpaceX’s CEO, said this is enough for a public beta.

“Once these satellites reach their target position, we will be able to roll out a fairly wide public beta in northern US & hopefully southern Canada,” he tweeted following the launch.

This beta would include the Detroit metro area and Ann Arbor, Michigan, he said, responding to a question on Twitter.

“Other countries to follow as soon as we receive regulatory approval,” he added.

Musk did not say exactly when the spacecraft were expected to reach their “target position,” and astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics told Ars Technica that it’s possible they might not be in place until February 2021.

Musk said in April that a public beta for the service would be up and running in Fall 2020. He also said in May 2019 that a commercially viable “initial” version of Starlink’s service for the US would be possible with 400 satellites, while 800 would be enough for “significant” global