Here’s why Amazon pulled the plug on its first big budget video game ‘Crucible’ shortly after launch

(Crucible Image)

Amazon Game Studios and Relentless Studios’ online third-person shooter Crucible will be taken offline. An entry labeled as a “final update” on its official development blog went up late on Friday afternoon to inform fans and beta testers that work on the game would be discontinued.

Crucible had been in development since 2014 when it launched on May 20, and was initially heralded as Amazon’s big attempt to break into the video game market. It was initially free to play and download, with a number of in-game purchases that offered new character costumes, additional currency, and other extras.

However, Crucible quickly ran into a host of problems, including server issues, lukewarm reviews, and criticism over its “freemium” pricing model. A little over a month later, on June 30, Amazon yanked Crucible from digital storefronts and returned it to a closed beta.

Since then, Crucible‘s primary developers at Seattle-based Relentless Studios have made steady incremental updates to the game, tracking each one on a public-facing Trello as a roadmap. They’d completed almost all of the features that they planned to add, with updates going live as recently as this week, but after evaluating player feedback and internal data, decided to pull the plug.

“We very much appreciate the way that our fans have rallied around our efforts, and we’ve loved seeing your responses to the changes we’ve made over the last few months, but ultimately we didn’t see a healthy, sustainable future ahead of Crucible,” the team wrote in its blog post. “We’ll be transitioning our team to focus on New World and other upcoming projects from Amazon Games.”

Crucible.

Crucible is what game enthusiasts often call a “hero shooter,” where players pick from a cast of characters with unique abilities and equipment to compete with one

Ride-hailing app Ola banned in London over safety concerns, shortly after Uber wins reprieve

  • Indian ride-hailing app Ola has been banned by London’s transport regulator over public safety concerns.
  • Transport for London (TfL) refused to grant Ola a new operator’s license after concluding it is not “fit and proper” to hold one.
  • The decision comes a week after Uber won a court battle that allows it to keep operating in London. 



a hand holding a cellphone: The Ola app displayed on a smartphone.


© Provided by CNBC
The Ola app displayed on a smartphone.

LONDON — Ola, a ride-hailing app that competes with Uber, has been banned by London’s transport regulator over public safety concerns.

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The Indian company, which is backed by Japanese tech giant SoftBank, launched its app in London in February. However, Transport for London (TfL) said Sunday that it has refused to grant Ola a new operator’s license after concluding it is not “fit and proper” to hold one.

The decision comes a week after Uber won a court battle that allows it to keep operating in London following a lengthy feud with TfL over its own safety record that dates back to 2017.

TfL said Ola allowed unlicensed drivers and vehicles to undertake more than 1,000 passenger trips and that it failed to immediately flag the breaches.

Helen Chapman, TfL’s director of licensing, regulation and charging, said in a statement: “Our duty as a regulator is to ensure passenger safety. Through our investigations we discovered that flaws in Ola’s operating model have led to the use of unlicensed drivers and vehicles in more than 1,000 passenger trips, which may have put passenger safety at risk.”

Ola, which also operates in Birmingham, Cardiff, Liverpool, and Reading, said it plans to appeal TfL’s decision, a move that would mean the app can continue operating.

Marc Rozendal, Ola’s U.K. managing director, said in a statement: “At Ola, our core principle is to work