‘Two Screens for Teachers’ to supply extra monitors in Seattle and puts out call for help in other cities

The two-screen setup of an elementary school teacher in Seattle. (Photo courtesy of Two Screens for Teachers)

Remote teaching is about to get a little bit easier for thousands of teachers in Seattle Public Schools. The nonprofit organization “Two Screens for Teachers” announced Tuesday that it’s purchasing a second computer monitor for every teacher who needs one, and plans to deliver about 3,000 monitors at a value of around $430,000.

Started by a small group of Seattle startup veterans, Two Screens for Teachers aims to boost teacher productivity through added technology, helping to make remote instruction less stressful during the ongoing pandemic.

Matt Lerner and Mike Mathieu are behind the idea. They previously co-founded Walk Score, a Seattle startup that sold to Redfin in 2014. Their hope is that their latest cause will spread beyond Seattle and they can inspire techies in other cities to purchase monitors for the thousands of teachers who need them.

PREVIOUSLY: Seattle startup vets launch ‘Two Screens for Teachers’ effort to help improve remote instruction

“I’ve spent my career in tech on two screens and can’t imagine working without them,” Lerner said in a news release. “During the COVID-19 pandemic, we’ve asked our teachers to become tech experts, on top of doing the crucial job of educating our children. A second screen lets teachers see their students on one screen and their lesson plans on the other. This is a simple productivity solution that people in tech centers like Seattle take for granted.”

“Having two monitors is incredibly helpful for teaching,” Seattle elementary school teacher Jannah H. said. “I use my second monitor to display my lesson plans and weekly schedule. I also sometimes use it to keep the video of my student’s faces open while I open a lesson powerpoint on my computer.”

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ARIZONA OPERA STUDIO CONCERT at Home Computer Screens

New Singers Join Arizona Opera’s Arion Roose Pullin Young Artist Program.

On October 5, 2020, I listened to Arizona Opera’s Studio Spotlight Series online concert held in the newly named the Shoshana B. and Robert S. Tancer Plaza adjoining the company’s building on Central Avenue in Phoenix. General Director Joseph Spector greeted the tiny audience of donors and the much larger online assemblage with remembrances of the company’s former general director, Joel Revzen, and a video about the late chair of the Arizona Opera Board of Directors, Robert Tancer. Only the speaker was unmasked.

Red and white flowers on either side of a light bar marked the stage area as soprano Caitlin Gotimer, in an afternoon-length dark dress, strode in front of the audience to sing the “Jewel Song” from Gounod’s Faust with pianist Robert Bosworth. Gotimer would have spent this past summer singing at the Glimmerglass Festival in northern New York had it not been for the pandemic. She showed her character’s surprise at seeing the casket of jewels and as she sang “ce nest plus toi” “that is no longer you” her expression showed distinct pleasure in seeing a bracelet grace her arm. She sang with clear coloratura that included a fine trill at the beginning.

Wearing pants to indicate she was singing a masculine part. Mezzo-soprano Michaela Wolz sang “Parto, parto, ma tu ben mio” (“I leave, but you my love”) from Mozart’s La Clemenza di Tito (“The Clemency of Titus”). In this difficult aria, Wolz brought out her character’s emotional state and finished her presentation with fast flourishes of coloratura. Baritone Rob McGinness offered the aria “Vi tak Pechalny” (“You are so sad”) from Tchaikovsky’s The Queen of Spades, and his resonant voice glinted with golden tones.

Caitlin Gotimer returned with “Tu che di gel sei

THE TELEPHONE at Home Computer Screens

BWW Review: PAREA SERIES: THE TELEPHONE at Home Computer ScreensOn October 3, I watched an updated version of Gian Carlo Menotti’s 1947 short opera, The Telephone. The dial telephone tethered to one room of the home that some of us oldsters grew up with has become a portable smart phone and each person has one. Even the time it took to dial a number had to be recalibrated because making connections is so much faster now. Ben and Lucy are still recognizable young lovers, however, and her addiction to the phone is more common than ever.

The Parea Virtual Recital Series, which explains the opera to English speakers around the world, begins with seven minutes of introduction and finishes with twenty minutes of interesting discussion. The conversation involves Emily Misch, a young artist with the Glimmerglass Festival, Will Meinert, an apprentice singer with Santa Fe Opera, pianist Anna Betka, and stage director Audrey Chait, along with company artistic director Trevor Neal and composer Bruce Adolphe.

The opera set consists of a couch, pillows, and a coffee table. Lucy wears a t-shirt and jeans shorts while Ben is dressed for his train trip in a flannel shirt and black pants. Obviously, this is not an expensive opera to stage unless the company has special phones made. During the overture, Lucy performs actions common to those of us in quarantine for COVID-I9. She shows her “haul” from shopping, exercises on the couch, starts to cook, and plays with an exquisitely disinterested cat. Ben is restless because he has to catch a train but he wants to propose marriage to Lucy first.

Most of their music is in the middle of their ranges and for the first few minutes singers and piano seemed to eschew anything softer than mezzoforte. When he tries to get her to sit quietly and listen, she