Coding Is Just A Small Part Of Computer Science: SP Robotic Works’ Sneha Priya


bg pranav&sneha_sp robotic worksImage: P Ravi Kumar

Sneha Priya’s mantra to introduce any technology is simple: the right exposure at the right age. “It must not be the other way around—just making it compulsory for the kids,” says cofounder of SP Robotic Works. Decoding the hysteria around coding for children in India, Priya concedes that the way it (coding) is being communicated to the parents, and the kind of FOMO being created, is probably not going in the right direction. “But if a kid embraces coding, it will be useful for her future,” she says. 

Started in 2012 by Pranavan and Sneha Priya, SP Robotic Works is an online edutainment company that specialises in providing experiential learning to students between the ages of 7 and 17, in latest technologies such as robotics, coding, drone, AI, VR and IoT. The idea is to promote STEM education (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) through AI-powered online learning platforms. “We have robotic courses designed in such a way that the child gets an exposure to all the components at an early age,” she says.

SP Robotic Works, which has over 80 branches across India apart from overseas presence, added one lakh students post pandemic. Stressing that the problem in the education system starts from an early age, when a child doesn’t get exposure or is not empowered to make the right choice later on, Priya contends that there are millions of engineers who made wrong decisions in opting for such a profession. “They were not given the right exposure at the right age,” she says, adding that career changes could’ve happened if the child had been exposed to options early on. Today, she lets on, if you ask any engineer or anybody the reason to opt for engineering, all of them will say it was

Robotic Interviews, Machine Learning And the Future Of Workforce Recruitment

These would affect all aspects of HR functions such as the way HR professionals on-board and hire people, and the way they train them

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Artificial intelligence (AI) is changing all aspects of our lives and that too at a rapid pace. This includes our professional lives, too. Experts expect that in the days ahead, AI would become a greater part of our careers as all companies are moving ahead with adopting such technology. They are using more machines that use AI technology that would affect our daily professional activities. Soon enough, we would see machine learning and deep learning in HR too. It would affect all aspects of HR (human resources) such as the way HR professionals on-board and hire people, and the way they train them.

Impact on onboarding and recruitment

These days, companies are using robotics in HR to make sure they have found the right people for particular job profiles. This means that even before you have stepped into your new office, your company already knows that you are the best person for the job thanks to such technology. They are using AI to pre-screen candidates before they invite the best candidates for interviews. This especially applies to large companies that offer thousands of new jobs each year and where millions of applicants go looking for jobs.       

Impact on training on the job

Companies are also using machine learning and deep learning in HR to help provide on-the-job training to employees. Just because you have landed a job and settled in it, it does not mean that you know

Skyborg: U.S. Air Force Wants a Fleet of Drones as Robotic Wingmen

The U.S. Air Force is getting serious about working with autonomous aircraft and aims to acquire an entire fleet of drones to act as robotic wingmen under its “Skyborg” program, National Defense Magazine reports.

As autonomous aircraft get more sophisticated, they could provide invaluable support to crewed fighter jets or bombers by escorting them into dangerous territories. The Air Force has said it is looking to purchase AI-powered craft to begin testing out their capabilities alongside crewed fighter jets.

“I expect that we will do sorties where a set number are expected to fly with the manned systems, and we’ll have crazy new [concepts of operation] for how they’ll be used,” Will Roper, assistant secretary of the Air Force for acquisition, technology, and logistics, said during an online event, as quoted in National Defense Magazine.

Another way that autonomous aircraft could be used is in missions that are too dangerous for human pilots, being sent on one-way suicide runs. “I expect that the [human] pilots … will decide, ‘does the Skyborg return and land with them and go to fight another day, or is it the end of its life and it’s going to go on a one-way mission?’” Roper added. “That’s what I love about them — their versatility and the fact that we can take risks with them.”

Illustration of the ATS F/A-18, part of Boeing's Airpower Teaming System
Illustration of the ATS F/A-18, part of Boeing’s Airpower Teaming System Boeing

Boeing is in the process of developing such technology as part of its Airpower Teaming System (ATS), a set of AI-powered, uncrewed aircraft which work cooperatively as a team.

The company recently delivered the first uncrewed “Loyal Wingman” aircraft to the Royal Australian Air Force, which will be the first of three prototypes working in the Australian defense system. The ATS will be able to fly independently using