Apple Joins 5G Revolution With Four New IPhones For Fast Networks

Apple joined the move to 5G on Tuesday, unveiling four new iPhones which use the new standard in what could be a turning point for the high-speed wireless technology.

“Today is the beginning of a new era for iPhone,” Apple chief executive Tim Cook said during a streamed launch event from the company’s headquarters in California.

“This is a huge moment for all of us. And we’re really excited. 5G will bring a new level of performance for downloads and uploads, higher quality video streaming, more responsive gaming, real time interactivity and so much more.”

The new models include the redesigned iPhone 12 — successor to the top-selling iPhone 11 launched last year — with a display of 6.1 inches at a starting price of $799, available October 23.

In this photo released by Apple, Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks about 5G during an Apple event at Apple Park in Cupertino, California In this photo released by Apple, Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks about 5G during an Apple event at Apple Park in Cupertino, California Photo: Apple Inc. / Brooks KRAFT

A smaller iPhone 12 mini with a 5.4 inch display will start at $699 and will be in stores November 13.

With more features, the iPhone 12 Pro will launch this month from $999 and the 6.7 inch Pro Max from $1,099 in November, the same levels as their predecessors.

The new handsets offer improvements to the camera system and a redesign that adds more display with a smaller overall size.

The new lineup of iPhones was expected to ignite a surge in interest in smartphone upgrades to take advantage of the faster networks.

Apple’s move could ignite interest in 5G devices as the new, fast networks are slowly being rolled out in the United States and other parts of the world.

In this photo released by Apple, Apple’s vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing Bob Borchers speaks about the HomePod mini during an Apple event at Apple Park in Cupertino, California In this photo released by Apple, Apple’s vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing Bob Borchers speaks about the HomePod mini

Cycling’s BMC And F1’s Red Bull Advanced Technologies Hint At Cycling Revolution

Swiss cycling brand BMC and U.K.-based Formula One motor racing team Red Bull Advanced Technologies have released a teaser video promising a “cycling revolution.”

In the video, former professional sprint cyclist Fabian Cancellara rides—fast—on an obscured road racing bicycle and ends by claiming that “if this works it’s going to change everything.”

BMC has been working with Aston Martin Red Bull Advanced Technologies for two years and the teaser video released on October 6 is the first communication about the collaboration since it was announced in 2018.

“After almost two years of intense research and development, Red Bull Advanced Technologies and innovative Swiss bike brand BMC have moved into the prototyping phase of their technology partnership,” said a joint announcement.

Red Bull Advanced Technologies’ Vehicle Science team has been helping BMC technicians with simulations of bike behavior based on data from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models.

The companies are enlisted Cancellara—an Olympic and World Champion—to validate and evaluate some of the first hardware developments produced by the partnership.

“It’s been fascinating to see what Formula 1 development techniques can bring to the field of bike design,” said Christian Horner, Aston Martin Red Bull Racing Team Principal.

“We have developed some hugely innovative concepts and now it’s time to step up the pace of our collaboration and take those enormously exciting ideas to the next level in pursuit of the next generation of performance cycling.”

David Zurcher, CEO of BMC, agreed: “The ideas we’re working on truly have the capacity to significantly improve the entire experience of performance cycling.”

It’s unlikely the collaboration will see any actual products for some time but, interestingly, the UCI, the world governing body for cycling, has recently admitted it will be loosening some of its restrictive design rules next year.

Confirming parts

Why Investors Should Focus More On The Infrastructure Supporting The AI Revolution

Guest Post by Basil Alomary

AI has been heralded as the catalyst for a new industrial revolution. While the potential for massive impact is very real, venture investors looking to capitalize on growth ought to spend more time considering the enabling infrastructure.

Although applications are myriad and diverse, from drug discovery to driverless cars, practical adoption in the enterprise has been lackluster. Only 1 in 20 business leaders would describe their companies as “implementing AI widely across the organization.” 


The starting point for identifying these investment opportunities is the deconstruction of the AI workflow—extracting each step in the process, from aggregation to deployment and seeking efficiency, scale and access.


An infrastructure-first approach to investing has the potential to yield greater venture returns with a lower risk profile. Looking at the smartphone market, for example, it’s unlikely that an investor in 2005 could have accurately projected that today Google, an internet search engine, would have a mobile business that is 5x larger than Nokia’s. That said, making broad investments in major chip manufacturers would have accurately identified Qualcomm as being a provider whose parts have supported the rise in mobile technology. 

Innovations in AI are exciting, but it’s less difficult to identify and bet on, the technologies supporting AI rather than predicting who will provide the voice assistant of the future. The starting point for identifying these investment opportunities is the deconstruction of the AI workflow—extracting each step in the process, from aggregation to deployment and seeking efficiency, scale and access.

What does it mean to operationalize AI?

The process

Is An Internet Service Provider Revolution On The Horizon?

By Ben Bawtree-Jobson, CEO at SiFi Networks.

For several years now, a revolution has been slowly building momentum in the battle for internet services being supplied to the home. For decades, consumers have been faced with either a monopoly or duopoly in the form of just a telco and/or cableco offering to their homes. As in any other unregulated monopolistic industry, this has resulted in higher prices for consumers, poorer customer service levels and lack of investment in infrastructure. In short, the customer has paid the price and suffered when compared to the rest of the developed world.

Unfortunately, the barriers to entry for anyone willing to compete have been exceptionally steep, with TV products and content being owned or exclusive to the cable TV companies and the vast amount of capital required to build out separate competing networks, but all of that is changing drastically.

The doom and gloom of yesteryear is over. For years, small networks and internet service providers have been nibbling at the edges of the big incumbent service providers, scrapping and fighting for customers in underserved markets. I don’t phrase it in this way to belittle their efforts — far from it. It’s this environment that has created hundreds of lean, agile and customer-service-focused internet service providers.

Small ISPs are further boosted by the ever-increasing rate of cord-cutting, with streaming services becoming more and more mainstream. Another old barrier to entry, content licenses, is being eviscerated, with content creators and owners such as Disney going directly to customers over the internet via services such as Disney+. Now, all the ISPs lack is the network to reach and compete to win those subscribers, and for that, they need capital or ready-made networks open for them to use.

Cue the entrance of a new way