Serena Williams’ VC firm quietly removed Coinbase from its website

  • Serena Williams invested in Coinbase in 2018 through her venture capital firm, Serena Ventures. But the cryptocurrency startup is no longer included on the investments page of the firm’s website.
  • Coinbase is entangled in controversy after CEO Brian Armstrong wrote a memo telling employees to leave their politics and social causes at the door. At least 60 employees have quit in the aftermath.
  • It’s possible that Serena Ventures has divested her stake in Coinbase, and that’s why it pulled the startup from its website. The VC firm did not respond to a request for comment.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Serena Williams is keen on investing in startups changing the world for the better.

That strategy explains her earlier investment in Coinbase, a company on a mission to “bring economic freedom to people all over” through an app that allows casual consumers to buy and sell Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies.

But a battle at Coinbase on the role of employee activism at work may have her tiptoeing away from the startup.

Serena Ventures, the investment firm started by Williams, has quietly removed Coinbase from the investments page on its website, even though it backed the cryptocurrency startup that’s now entangled in political controversy.

In September, Coinbase’s CEO Brian Armstrong publicly posted a memo describing how the company should take a hands-off approach to politics and social causes, and instead stay focused on the company mission. The directive was viewed by some as a “cultural reset” after employees pressured the startup to issue a statement on the Black Lives Matter movement in June, and the company’s stonewalling led some to quit and others to do a virtual walkout.

serena ventures old investments page

The Serena Ventures website included Coinbase on its investments page as recently as July 2020.

The Wayback Machine/Serena Ventures


serena ventures investments

A screenshot

App Removed After Helping Users Bypass China’s Great Firewall

(Bloomberg) — An app backed by Chinese cybersecurity giant 360 Security Technology Inc. that helped users vault over Beijing’s Great Firewall was blocked and removed from mobile stores Saturday.



a close up of a light: Green lights illuminate cable terminals on the Sberbank and SberCloud Christofari supercomputer during an event to mark its launch into commercial operation inside the Sberbank PJSC data processing center (DPC) at the Skolkovo Innovation Center in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, Dec. 16, 2019. As Sberbank expands its technology offerings, the Kremlin is backing legislation aimed at keeping the country's largest internet companies under local control by limiting foreign ownership.


© Bloomberg
Green lights illuminate cable terminals on the Sberbank and SberCloud Christofari supercomputer during an event to mark its launch into commercial operation inside the Sberbank PJSC data processing center (DPC) at the Skolkovo Innovation Center in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, Dec. 16, 2019. As Sberbank expands its technology offerings, the Kremlin is backing legislation aimed at keeping the country’s largest internet companies under local control by limiting foreign ownership.

The Tuber browser, which let mainland users visit blocked sites from Google to Facebook Inc., stopped functioning Saturday afternoon and could no longer be located on the app store run by Huawei Technologies Co. It was unclear which agency ordered its removal, which came after Chinese users on social media hailed their newfound ability to peruse content from Youtube videos to Instagram photos without an illegal virtual private network, or VPN.

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Tuber’s removal may have ended what many Chinese users saw as a state-sanctioned window to the wider internet arena. Beijing maintains rigid control over its internet sphere, requiring companies from Tencent Holdings Ltd. to TikTok-owner ByteDance Ltd. to censor and scrub content critical of the government or its policies.

Tuber initially appeared to provide the nation’s 904 million online users the ability to legally visit overseas websites and browse foreign social media, much of which is barred. It required mobile number registration, giving developers the ability to track activity because all smartphone numbers in the country are linked to unique Chinese identification.

A public relations employee at 360 Security declined to provide immediate comment. The Cyberspace Administration of China, which regulates the internet, didn’t respond to calls

Gmail mistakenly removed the button that lets you triage loads of emails at once, but it’s coming back

If you’re not the inbox zero type — and I’m definitely not — you might sometimes rely on Gmail’s “Select all conversations that match this search” option to read, archive, or delete hundreds or thousands of messages at once.

Except we can’t do that anymore, and neither can a number of angry Gmail users we’ve spotted. The option has up and disappeared. Google accidentally removed it, the company confirms to The Verge.

Instead of the option, we’re seeing a nav bar with a handful of shortcut buttons when we search, like this:

Thankfully, Google tells The Verge it’s coming back “as soon as possible,” adding:

We are working to bring back the feature in Gmail that allows you to ‘select all conversations that match this search’ as soon as possible. This feature was removed unintentionally. We apologize to our users who may have been affected.

That’ll be good news to those who posted in this Gmail help thread from six days ago, which had gone unanswered until now, and it explains why Google’s own Gmail support team was unaware of a change; on at least a couple occasions, they’d been giving readers instructions that no