The Five Forces – The Real Infrastructure Initiative & Seven Companies To Make It Happen

“What I have tried to do with my work is to make baseball more fun,” The Bill James Newsletter, 1985 as quoted in Moneyball, by Michael Lewis

Five forces are critical to driving any infrastructure initiative. Ignore the push or pull of any one of these forces and you weaken your effort, or go nowhere – respect their power and you drive forward. My wife, Ingrid, criticized me over the weekend: “You think about everything in terms of infrastructure.” “But how else are we going to save the country,” I responded. Tunnel vision. But I think that – right now – that is maybe not be a bad thing. This is an extraordinarily chaotic period, we are in what seems like the eye of the hurricane – the next 12 months are likely to be one of the most challenging, and hopefully one of the most creative, periods in our history. Infrastructure is an investment in our future, it brings us together, and it carries us closer to our dreams. To begin, though, we need to understand – differently, with crystal clarity – the five forced, and we need to work out a strategic solution that works for all of us, and that sustains investment, long-term.

Five Forces Defining the Infrastructure Landscape. Much as Michael Porter’s famous five forces defined the competitive intensity of an industry, there are five forces that are critical to how to think about a country’s infrastructure industry – get them wrong and investment will fall, be inconsistent, or ineffective. From 1992 through to 2016 every successful presidential candidate promised, and failed, to drive infrastructure forward. By organizing strategy around these five forces the next Administration can – intensely, perhaps even ruthlessly

Real Estate Software Market Will Showcase Positive Impact During 2020-2024 | Growing Middle-class Population to Boost Market Growth

Technavio has been monitoring the global real estate software market size and it is poised to grow by USD 3,825.16 billion during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of about 9% during the forecast period. The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201012005071/en/

Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Real Estate Software Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire).

Technavio’s in-depth research has all your needs covered as our research reports include all foreseeable market scenarios, including pre- & post-COVID-19 analysis. We offer $1000 worth of FREE customization

The market is fragmented, and the degree of fragmentation will accelerate during the forecast period. Altus Group Ltd., AppFolio Inc., Autodesk Inc., CoStar Group Inc., Fiserv Inc., International Business Machines Corp., LanTrax Inc., Oracle Corp., SAP SE, and Yardi Systems Inc. are some of the major market participants. To make the most of the opportunities, market vendors should focus more on the growth prospects in the fast-growing segments, while maintaining their positions in the slow-growing segments.

Buy 1 Technavio report and get the second for 50% off. Buy 2 Technavio reports and get the third for free.

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Growing middle-class population has been instrumental in driving the growth of the market.

Technavio’s custom research reports offer detailed insights on the impact of COVID-19 at an industry level, a regional level, and subsequent supply chain operations. This customized report will also help clients keep up with new product launches in direct & indirect COVID-19 related markets, upcoming vaccines and pipeline analysis, and significant developments in vendor operations and government regulations. Download a Free Sample Report on COVID-19 Impacts

Real Estate Software Market 2020-2024:

Death of the HQ? Pandemic hits commercial real estate, but long-term trends still open to debate

A rendering of one of Amazon’s new buildings in Bellevue, Wash. (Vulcan Image)

“HQ’s are finished.”

That was the hot take this week from Chris Herd, founder and CEO of remote work setup startup Firstbase. After speaking with about 1,000 companies over the past six months, he estimates that many will be cutting their office space by as much as 40% to 60%. About 90% of workforces indicated that they “never want to be in an office again full-time,” he wrote.

The latest example of the trend is the news this morning that working from home will be a permanent part of the mix at Microsoft. Boosting access to talent, reducing costs, and quality of life were among the benefits of remote work cited by companies in Herd’s informal survey.

“Good thread on the future of work. I agree with him,” former Zillow Group CEO Spencer Rascoff chimed in.

Why this Seattle-area startup ditched its physical office — and what it means for the future of work

Of course, Herd has a vested interest in the future of remote work, and his sample looks to be more anecdotal than scientific. And others aren’t convinced that physical offices are dead. Commercial real estate firms, which have their own inherent biases on the topic, remain bullish about employees eventually returning to the office despite increasing vacancy rates over the past quarter.

“It will take some time to return to our pre-COVID-19 levels but we are confident of our recovery,” real estate company Broderick Group said in its Q3 report for the Seattle region. “Bet on cities. Bet on Seattle.”

So what do the numbers say? Two new statistics provide a sense for the trends.

  • Office building vacancy is up across the Seattle region amid the shift to remote work due

The Real Problem Wasn’t Cambridge Analytica, But The Data Brokers That Outlived It

Cambridge Analytica, the disgraced and now closed political-consulting firm that got caught staging a heist of tens of millions of Facebook users’ data, now looks to be suffering a final indignity: being seen as not that special of a villain after all. 

Two days after the U.K. Information Commissioner’s Office released a lengthy report that found Cambridge Analytica’s work did not influence the Brexit referendum, one of that British firm’s foremost American critics argued that Cambridge’s death was meaningless because the underlying privacy problem remains very much alive. 

David Carroll, an associate professor of media design at The New School’s Parsons School of Design in New York, made this case by walking an online audience through his own Cambridge Analytica file—for which he pursued a legal case in the U.K. with only partial success before investigators for Britain’s Channel 4 News found his details in a massive stash of leaked Cambridge data. 

As viewers of Carroll’s talk Wednesday at the TEDxMidAtlantic online conference saw, most of this was other people’s work—bits harvested by third-party data brokers and then bought by Cambridge to feed into personality scores for such metrics as neuroticism and conscientiousness. 

Carroll, semi-famous for his role in the Netflix documentary The Great Hack, emphasized three key points about the work Cambridge did for such Republican customers as President Trump’s 2016 campaign. 

First, his file wasn’t that comprehensive because of the obvious unlikelihood of a Brooklyn academic voting for Trump—“I was not a targeted voter”—and his own efforts to be “a very privacy-defensive consumer.” Nor was the material collected by such data brokers as Data Trust and Infogroup (now Data Axle) all that accurate. 

‘Minecraft Kirby’ isn’t real, but that’s not stopping the internet

Any time a new Super Smash Bros. Ultimate character is announced, one of the first things people ask isn’t how the fighter plays. Instead, people demand to know what the ever-gluttonous Kirby will look like once he inhales them and copies the new character’s power. And so, shortly after Minecraft Steve’s Smash Bros. reveal, screenshots of what seemed to be a blocky Kirby started going viral.





© Image: Nintendo via Jory Satana


Here’s the bad news. It’s not real. The images floating around right now all seem to hail from a two-year-old Wii U mod made by Jory Satana that adds a more pointy version of our puffball to the platform fighter. Already, there’s a comment under the mod posted on Thursday that reads, “well, sakurai did it.”

Despite this sad truth, the internet’s gears are in hyperdrive. Many are expressing love for “Minecraft Kirby,” or drawing up fan art that uses the mod’s art style as inspiration for their depictions. Others are content with just cracking jokes about what Minecraft Kirby will inevitably look like. And some are just riffing off the possibilities of a cuboid friend.

There’s always the possibility, of course, that the modded Minecraft Kirby turns out to be weirdly prescient about how Nintendo’s official version will end up looking like. If nothing else, I’m sure that the real Minecraft Kirby will be plenty cute, even if he’s exactly the way we imagined he would be.

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