Privacy push could stop some annoying website pop-ups and online tracking

If you’re sick of websites tracking you and just as frustrated with website pop-ups prompting you to dig through obscure browser cookie settings — good news. An alliance including web publishers and browser makers has developed technology to stop websites from selling or sharing the data they gather about you, and you can try it now.



a piece of paper: Angela Lang/CNET


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Angela Lang/CNET

If the effort succeeds, a single setting in your browser could forbid website publishers from selling your data — at least if you live in California. And unlike a related effort years ago called Do Not Track, this one could have legal teeth.

Allies include publishers like The New York Times and Washington Post and browser makers Brave and Mozilla . One way to try it is with the Nightly test version of Brave, the browser maker said. Another is by installing DuckDuckGo’s mobile browser or desktop browser extension, the privacy-centric search engine said. “We hope [Global Privacy Control] will become a widely adopted standard,” DuckDuckGo said in a tweet.



a piece of paper: In at least 10 schools, Inpixon has installed radio frequency scanners to pull data from phone signals like Bluetooth and Wi-Fi to keep track of students.


© Angela Lang/CNET

In at least 10 schools, Inpixon has installed radio frequency scanners to pull data from phone signals like Bluetooth and Wi-Fi to keep track of students.


The Global Privacy Control project dovetails with two recent privacy laws. The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the earlier Global Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in Europe are why so many websites make you wrestle with settings for cookies. Those small text files are key to how many websites track your online activity.

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One provision of the CCPA allows for a single switch you could set in your browser, through the browser itself or a

Privacy push could stop some annoying website popups and online tracking

Companies want to know what you do online.

Angela Lang/CNET

If you’re sick of websites tracking you and just as frustrated with website pop-ups prompting you to dig through obscure browser cookie settings — good news. An alliance including web publishers and browser makers has developed technology to stop websites from selling or sharing the data they gather about you, and you can try it now.

If the effort succeeds, a single setting in your browser could forbid website publishers from selling your data — at least if you live in California. And unlike a related effort years ago called Do Not Track, this one could have legal teeth.

Allies include publishers like The New York Times and Washington Post and browser makers Brave and Mozilla. One way to try it is with the Nightly test version of Brave, the browser maker said. Another is by installing DuckDuckGo’s mobile browser or desktop browser extension, the privacy-centric search engine said. “We hope [Global Privacy Control] will become a widely-adopted standard,” DuckDuckGo said in a tweet.

The Global Privacy Control project dovetails with two recent privacy laws. The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the earlier Global Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in Europe are why so many websites make you wrestle with settings for cookies. Those small text files are key to how many websites track your online activity.

One provision of the CCPA allows for a single switch you could set in your browser, through the browser itself or a browser extension, that would tell every website what you wanted and sweep away those dialog boxes. That’s what the alliance members have built, and they’re working to make it legally binding under the CCPA so websites

DuckDuckGo, Mozilla launch privacy settings for the internet

A group of tech companies, publishers, and activist groups including the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Mozilla, and DuckDuckGo are backing a new standard to let internet users set their privacy settings for the entire web.

“Before today, if you want to exercise your privacy rights, you have to go from website to website and change all your settings,” says Gabriel Weinberg, CEO of DuckDuckGo, the privacy-focused search engine.

That new standard, called Global Privacy Control, lets users set a single setting in their browsers or through browser extensions telling each website that they visit not to sell or share their data. It’s already backed by some publishers including The New York Times, The Washington Post, and the Financial Times, as well as companies including Automattic, which operates blogging platforms wordpress.com and Tumblr.

Advocates believe that under a provision of the California Consumer Privacy Act, activating the setting should send a legally binding request that website operators not sell their data. The setting may also be enforceable under Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation, and the backers of the standard are planning to communicate with European privacy regulators about the details of how that would work, says Peter Dolanjski, director of product at DuckDuckGo. At the moment, the official specification of the standard specifies that it’s in an experimental stage and “currently not intended to convey legally binding requests,” but that’s expected to change as legal authorities and industry groups have time to react to the standard and put it into place across the web, Dolanjski says.

“It’s going to take a little bit of time for them to make the modifications and all that,” he says.

If it becomes widely accepted and helps prevent website operators and companies from building cross-site profiles of their users, the new standard could

Privacy push could banish some annoying website popups and online tracking

Companies want to know what you do online.

Angela Lang/CNET

If you’re sick of websites tracking you and just as frustrated with website pop-ups prompting you to dig through obscure browser cookie settings — good news. An alliance including web publishers and browser makers has developed technology to stop websites from selling or sharing the data they gather about you.

If the effort succeeds, a single setting in your browser could forbid website publishers from selling your data — at least if you live in California. And unlike a related effort years ago called Do Not Track, this one could have legal teeth.

The Global Privacy Control project, with support from publishers like The New York Times and Washington Post and browser makers Brave and Mozilla, dovetails with two recent privacy laws. The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the earlier Global Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in Europe are why so many websites make you wrestle with settings for cookies. Those small text files are key to how many websites track your online activity.

One provision of the CCPA allows for a single switch you could set in your browser, through the browser itself or a browser extension, that would tell every website what you wanted and sweep away those dialog boxes. That’s what the alliance members have built, and they’re working to make it legally binding under the CCPA so websites would have to honor the setting.

It’s the latest move in a years-long effort to balance privacy protections with the convenience of free, ad-supported websites. Advertisers held the upper hand with an earlier, voluntary effort called Do Not Track that fizzled.

But the tone of the discussion is different now: Privacy protection is in

Prop 24, the California Privacy Rights Act Receives Support From 77% Of Likely California Voters

Prop 24, the California Privacy Rights Act Receives Support From 77% Of Likely California Voters

PR Newswire

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Oct. 6, 2020

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Oct. 6, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today the YES on Prop 24 campaign released polling results from Goodwin Simon Strategic Research showing that voters continue to overwhelmingly support Prop 24, the California Privacy Rights Act on the November ballot, with 77% of likely voters saying they will vote YES on the ballot measure.

Yes on Privacy, Yes on Prop 24 (PRNewsfoto/Californians for Consumer Priva)
Yes on Privacy, Yes on Prop 24 (PRNewsfoto/Californians for Consumer Priva)

Voters are demanding privacy rights and that’s exactly what we’re giving them in Prop 24- that’s why it has 77% support.

Even more telling is that despite negative campaigning by the opposition, only 11% of voters oppose the measure – the same number as when the last poll was taken in July.

“It’s crystal clear that voters are demanding privacy rights, and that’s exactly what we’re giving them with Prop 24, the California Privacy Rights Act,” said General Consultant and Campaign Manager Robin Swanson. “Voters also don’t believe the misinformation being put out by opponents. When voters read what the measure actually does to expand privacy rights, protect our sensitive personal information, stop hackers and triple fines for violating our kids’ data – they invariably vote YES on 24.”

The poll, which was conducted between September 29October 5 included 750 likely California voters. The 77% support number is within the margin of error of a previous poll taken in July, which showed the measure at 81% support.

CURRENT POLL: (September 29October 5)

NET: TOTAL YES

77%

NET: TOTAL NO

11%

UNSURE

12%

PREVIOUS POLL: (July 26-31)

NET: TOTAL YES

81%

NET: TOTAL NO

11%

UNSURE

8%

About Prop 24 / The California Privacy