Apple dropped the price of its EarPods and iPhone power adapters by $10, after it said the iPhone 12 would not ship with these accessories



a close up of a phone: Ubon Ratchathani/Getty Images


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Ubon Ratchathani/Getty Images

Apple has dropped the price of its EarPods and iPhone wall chargers by $10, after it confirmed that the new iPhones it announced Tuesday would not ship with these accessories.

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Its EarPod headphones — a wired alternative to Apple’s Bluetooth AirPods — are now $19 on the Apple Store, a third less than the previous price. 

Its 20W power adapter, which lets you charge your phone at a plug socket, is also $19 — this is a new product, and down from $29 for the old adapter, which Apple has now discontinued.

Older iPhone models still on sale on the Apple Store, including the iPhone 11, XR, and SE, will also no longer ship with these accessories, the company said.

At its iPhone 12 announcement on Tuesday, the company said that shipping phones without these accessories would let it use smaller boxes, helping it meet its environmental goals.

“It’s like removing 450,000 cars from the road per year,” Apple executive Lisa Jackson said at the launch event.

Read more: Apple has acquired more AI startups than Google, Facebook or any other Big Tech company. Is Apple bulking up in AI or just catching up?

Instead of a wall charger, the iPhone 12 will come with a USB-C to Lightning cable, which can be plugged into a computer or wall adapter for charging.

Other phone-markers have already removed chargers and headphones from their boxes, Ben Wood, chief of research at CCS Insight, told Business Insider, but many more companies will likely follow Apple’s lead.

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Apple Lowers Price of EarPods by $10 Now That They Aren’t Included With iPhones

Apple today introduced its iPhone 12 lineup, and as was rumored, all four models ship without EarPods or a power adapter in the box. Starting today, the iPhone 11, iPhone XR, and iPhone SE will no longer include these accessories either.


Apple’s website encourages customers to use their existing Apple power adapter and headphones or buy these accessories separately, and to help offset the cost, Apple has now lowered the price of its EarPods with a Lightning connector from $29 to $19. Apple’s new 20W power adapter for iPhones also retails for $19, down from $29 for its now-discontinued 18W power adapter that was included with the iPhone 11 lineup until now.

Apple touted the environmental benefits of no longer including EarPods or a power adapter with iPhones, noting that the move reduces carbon emissions and avoids the mining and use of rare-earth elements. iPhone 12 models also ship in a thinner box as a result, with Apple claiming that it can fit 70 percent more iPhone boxes on a single pallet during shipping.

Apple added that many customers have switched to wireless headphones like AirPods, and said there are over two billion Apple power adapters in the world, implying that many customers no longer need these accessories.

Last month, the Apple Watch Series 6 and Apple Watch SE launched without power adapters in the box, so it is no surprise that iPhones have followed suit. However, all iPad models are still bundled with power adapters in the box for now.

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Pachama: Carbon-credit startup puts a price on trees, market opportunity

  • Backed by Amazon and a fund led by Bill Gates, Pachama runs a marketplace for forest carbon credits. 
  • Carbon credits are generated when a forest is conserved or restored. 
  • As more companies pledge to reduce or eliminate their emissions, the market for carbon credits is expected to surge. 
  • Researchers challenge the efficacy of carbon credits for curbing deforestation and reducing global emissions.
  • For more stories like this, sign up here for our weekly energy newsletter.

In late August, a forest fire, set by lightning and emboldened by climate change, whipped across the Santa Cruz Mountains in California, ultimately burning more than 85,000 acres. 

Diego Saez Gil’s home was among its victims. 

Ironically, it was in that home that Saez Gil dreamt up the idea for his startup, Pachama. Founded in 2018, the company aims to fight climate change — which makes wildfires more common and severe — by protecting forests.

“It is meaningful that now my house is taken by the consequences of climate change, and that those forests will need restoring soon,” Saez Gil, the company’s cofounder, wrote on Medium the day after his home was destroyed. “You can’t make our mission more personal to me now.” 

Click here to subscribe to Insider Energy, Business Insider’s weekly energy newsletter.

Saez Gil’s startup is a tech company, but it’s not your typical Silicon Valley startup.

Pachama sells carbon credits, which represent the carbon dioxide that trees remove from the air. Forests that are protected or restored can generate credits, and companies can buy them to offset their own emissions.

The idea is that, in doing so, businesses can help curb deforestation while reducing their overall climate footprint. 

Though Pachama is just a few years old, it’s won backing from major investors including Bill Gates’ Breakthrough Energy Ventures, Amazon, and tennis

iPhone 12 got a major leak just before launch day: Details on price and release dates

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The iPhone 11 taking advantage of iOS 14’s ability to customize the home page. 


Angela Lang/CNET

Apple’s official event is Tuesday, but possible leaks about the next iPhone — widely expected to be called the iPhone 12 — continue to come out. Leaker Kang posted on Chinese social media site Weibo that there will be four models of iPhones that range in price from $699 to $1,099, according to The Verge. 

The models include an iPhone 12 Mini with a 5.4-inch display, which starts at $699 and will be available for preorder on Nov. 6 or 7 with retail availability of Nov. 13 or 14. The 6.1-inch iPhone 12 will start at $799 and be available to preorder on Oct. 16 or 17, with release on Oct. 23 or 24. Both models come with storage options ranging from 64 gigabytes to 256GB. 

The higher-end models include the 6.1-inch iPhone 12 Pro, which costs $999 and include a telephoto lens with 4X optical zoom and a lidar sensor for depth tracking, similar to the new iPad Pros. Preorders reportedly begin on Oct. 16 or 17, with release on Oct. 23 or 24. The 6.7-inch iPhone 12 Pro Max will start at $1,099, and include the lidar sensor and a telephoto lens with 5X optical zoom. It’ll be available for preorder on Nov. 13 or 14, with a release date on Nov. 20 or 21. Both models will storage options ranging from 128GB to 512GB. 

Kang also notes that Apple will sell a HomePod Mini for $99, as well as introduce a MagSafe charger, using the same branding as the magnetic charging cables found in its older MacBook laptops. 

An Apple spokesman wasn’t

Liberia Orange, MTN fight regulator on mobile price hikes



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Liberia, one of Africa’s smallest economies, has seen a rapid growth in mobile users over the last decade, but its regulators are stuck in an ongoing pricing battle with two of the region’s largest telecoms companies in the world.

French giant Orange and Lonestar Cell MTN, a subsidiary of South Africa’s MTN Group have told consumers they are increasing prices because of a new order which imposes additional surcharges of $0.008 for each minute of voice calls and $0.0065 on each megabyte of data.

Under the new plan, a $1 recharge card is worth 15 minutes of voice calls, down from 45 mins. And $2 will buy 600 megabytes on internet data down from 1.2 gigabytes.

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In response, the state regulator, Liberia Telecommunication Authority, said on Oct. 8 the mobile companies were engaging in illegal price-fixing and collusion . It gave the network companies 12 hours to rescind their new prices which they did not.

The regulator argues the price floors established in 2019 gave the network companies a windfall of $104 million in extra revenue. And that the new prices are designed for additional profiteering.

French giant Orange and Lonestar Cell MTN, a subsidiary of South Africa’s MTN Group have been in a long-running battle with the Liberia Telecommunications Authority over charges which are aimed at increasing competitiveness and in turn bring stability to the market.

Over the years, the two companies have become a dominant duopoly providing voice calls and data at cheap prices, thus effectively pricing competitors like Novafone out of the market. Novafone was later bought by Lonestar-MTN.

The mobile network companies are fighting to lower their prices arguing that ordinary Liberians cannot afford a price regime which increases the average phone user’s costs by as much as 100%.

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