Sony’s WH-1000XM4 noise-canceling headphones are $298 at Amazon, Best Buy, and B&H Photo

The second and final day of Prime Day 2020 is here, but there are still a ton of deals to take advantage of for the next several hours, including this fantastic deal on Sony’s new WH-1000XM4 wireless over-ear headphones. Normally, these headphones cost $350, but if you are an Amazon Prime member, you can buy a pair for just $298. Even better? Amazon will also give you a $25 gift card to its website when you purchase these headphones. Best Buy and B&H Photo are also price matching Amazon, but unfortunately, neither retailer is including the gift card sweetener like Amazon. The price is available for both color options (black and silver).

Sony originally released these headphones in August. When stacked up against its predecessor, the WH-1000XM3, the newer model shares a similar design but allows users the ability to pair two devices via Bluetooth simultaneously. My colleague, Chris Welch, noted in his review that the WH-1000XM4s have improved mic performance, which should make the audio output on calls clearer.

If you are looking for more headphone options, we picked out the best headphone deals you can grab during Prime Day 2020, plus a few from Amazon’s competitors, too.

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Ghost Photo in Scotland Has the Internet Freaking Out

Spooky season is in full effect and as such, some of the internet’s most popular ghost images have started to go viral once again as those on social media look to give themselves the creeps. One such picture making the rounds again was shared to r/Ghosts around this time last year of, at first glance, what appears to be seemingly innocuous Scottish ruins dated back to 3,000 B.C. Upon closer examination, however, it would appear there’s an apparition of a person looking through one of the windows of the ruins.

Shared by Redditor u/MotorBiker1985 around this time last year, the image was captured with a TLR Rolleiflex camera manufactured in the 1930s. “Most people I know who have seen it say it is very interesting, that is why I posted it online,” the Redditor wrote.

This picture was taken with a TLR Rolleiflex (made in 1930s) on Foma 400 film in Scotland in a ruin in a park near prehistoric (2000-3000 BC) burial ground in fall of 2016. Only scanned and cropped. The face in the window is visible on the negative film. from r/Ghosts

If you zoom in on the picture, it’s apparent there’s something in the window that isn’t naturally part of the building. That something, of course, looks very much like a spirit.

“Some see various expressions in the supposed face on the photo, some try to explain, however any explanation I have heard so far can be easily countered with various arguments,” MotorBiker1985 added.

As one might expect, people on the subreddit tried every which way to debunk it, claiming it could be the effect of extended or double exposure. The Redditor quickly uploaded the negative of the photograph and lo and behold, the face also appears on the negative.

u/MotorBiker1985 made sure to point out

Facebook’s nudity-spotting AI mistook a photo of some onions for ‘sexually suggestive’ content



a group of oranges in a pile: Getty


© Getty
Getty

  • A Canadian garden center had its Facebook ad for onion seeds taken down by the platform on Monday.
  • Facebook said the ad was removed for breaking its rules on “products with overtly sexual positioning.”
  • Facebook’s head of comms in Canada said the post had been restored on Wednesday, and that it had been initially removed by the platform’s automated moderation systems.
  • “We use automated technology to keep nudity off our apps. But sometimes it doesn’t know a walla walla onion from a, well, you know.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Facebook’s AI struggles to tell the difference between sexual pictures of the human body and globular vegetables.

A garden center in Newfoundland, Canada on Monday received a notice from Facebook about an ad it had uploaded for Walla Walla onion seeds that contained a photo of some onions.

Facebook’s notice said the ad broke its rules on “products with overtly sexual positioning,” clarifying: “listings may not position products or services in a sexually suggestive manner.”



a screenshot of fruit and vegetable stand: The Seed Company NL, Facebook.


© The Seed Company NL, Facebook.
The Seed Company NL, Facebook.

Facebook on Wednesday told Canada’s CBC News the ad had been reinstated after review. The mistake had been made by its AI moderation tech, which automatically takes down content it thinks contains nudity, it said.

“We use automated technology to keep nudity off our apps. But sometimes it doesn’t know a walla walla onion from a, well, you know. We restored the ad and are sorry for the business’ trouble,” Meg Sinclair, Facebook Canada’s head of communications told CBC.

She did not clarify what she meant by a “you know.”

This is not the first time Facebook’s automated systems have over-zealously removed content later reinstated by human moderators. In 2018 its systems took down a post containing excerpts from

UK passport photo checker shows bias against dark-skinned women

An illustration showing photos of three people with different skin tones. The photo of the darkest skinned person has a poor quality score and the photo of the lightest skinned person has a good quality score
An illustration showing photos of three people with different skin tones. The photo of the darkest skinned person has a poor quality score and the photo of the lightest skinned person has a good quality score

Women with darker skin are more than twice as likely to be told their photos fail UK passport rules when they submit them online than lighter-skinned men, according to a BBC investigation.

One black student said she was wrongly told her mouth looked open each time she uploaded five different photos to the government website.

This shows how “systemic racism” can spread, Elaine Owusu said.

The Home Office said the tool helped users get their passports more quickly.

“The indicative check [helps] our customers to submit a photo that is right the first time,” said a spokeswoman.

“Over nine million people have used this service and our systems are improving.

“We will continue to develop and evaluate our systems with the objective of making applying for a passport as simple as possible for all.”

Skin colour

The passport application website uses an automated check to detect poor quality photos which do not meet Home Office rules. These include having a neutral expression, a closed mouth and looking straight at the camera.

BBC research found this check to be less accurate on darker-skinned people.

More than 1,000 photographs of politicians from across the world were fed into the online checker.

The results indicated:

  • Dark-skinned women are told their photos are poor quality 22% of the time, while the figure for light-skinned women is 14%

  • Dark-skinned men are told their photos are poor quality 15% of the time, while the figure for light-skinned men is 9%

Photos of women with the darkest skin were four times more likely to be graded poor quality, than women with