The Pandemic Has Benefited One Group Of People: Billionaires

Other than Netflix, Andrew Cuomo and the virus itself, no one has benefited from the COVID-19 pandemic more than American billionaires.

Over the last six months, roughly 3 out of 4 members of America’s 10-digit-wealth club have seen a rise in their net worths. Sixteen American billionaires are worth at least twice as much now as they were in March. And Jeff Bezos, who was already worth $113 billion at the start of 2020, is heading into the year’s final stretch $73 billion richer.

Michael Bloomberg and Charles Koch are both up by $7 billion, and Mark Zuckerberg has added another $46 billion to his already staggering $54 billion in wealth. Elon Musk found time between COVID truther tweets and CPAP machine donations to take his fortune from $25 billion to $92 billion.

Some billionaires have gotten richer as a direct result of the pandemic. Amazon, for example, was one of the few companies in the United States to expand as consumers locked down at home and avoided brick-and-mortar retail. Facebook, Google, Tesla and Microsoft have also boomed in the past six months, adding to the fortunes of their respective billionaire founders.


See how much Jeff Bezos has made during the pandemic in 3D. On desktop, use your mouse to zoom and rotate the object in 3D; on mobile, place the object in your space, use your fingers to resize and rotate in augmented reality.

Most billionaires, however, have grown their wealth not as business leaders but as investors. One of the ongoing mysteries of the COVID-19 recession is why it has — so far at least — barely touched the stock market. After falling roughly 35% in February, both the Dow Jones and the S&P 500 returned to pre-pandemic levels in just 126 trading days, a turnaround that

Bill Gates Learned at an Early Age This Lesson That Takes Most People a Lifetime. Some People Never Do

You can say what you want about Bill Gates, but it would be hard to argue that he hasn’t experienced success. He’s one of the wealthiest people on earth, having co-founded one of the world’s most valuable companies. He now spends his time giving away all of that money to causes like eradicating polio. His is not a bad resume. 

A lot of that accomplishment comes from a simple lesson Bill Gates learned early on in his life. I think it’s worth looking at, especially since it’s something many people take a lifetime to learn, if they ever do at all.

Most of us assume that it is, which means everything that isn’t success must be failure. But the opposite of success isn’t failure. Or, it doesn’t have to be. And, that’s a distinction that can make all the difference. Unfortunately, it’s one that many people never learn to make.

Most people measure success by whatever the equivalent is in their job of shooting an arrow and hitting the center of the target. There’s very little margin for error: you either hit it or you didn’t. If that’s the case, everything else is a failure. That belief is often what makes us afraid to try, because success is narrowly defined as only the best possible outcome. 

In most cases, though, success is incremental. You try something and it works, you take a step forward. You try something else, and it doesn’t work, so you learn something and look for more things like the first attempt. Eventually, you get to wherever you were headed.

This brings up another reason success isn’t binary: in many cases, it’s impossible to understand the best possible outcome. In fact, there are a lot of things that don’t qualify as a “success,” but shouldn’t be defined

Space internet is ready for people to start using it, Elon Musk says

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has said his space internet project is ready for public use following the latest launch of Starlink satellites.





© Provided by The Independent


SpaceX delivered a further 60 satellites into low-Earth orbit this week, bringing the total number close to 800.

The private space firm hopes to eventually launch tens of thousands of Starlink satellites to create a constellation capable of beaming high-speed broadband down to 99 per cent of the inhabited world.

“Once these satellites reach their target position, we will be able to roll out a fairly wide public beta in northern US and hopefully southern Canada,” Musk tweeted following the launch.

“Other countries to follow as soon as we receive regulatory approval.”

The Starlink network has already been tested on a limited scale, providing internet to emergency responders in the US following recent wildfires.

The Washington Emergency Management division was able to set up a Starlink-powered WiFi hotspot for residents in Malden last month after 80 per cent of the town was destroyed by fire.

Musk said at the time that SpaceX was prioritising emergency services and locations with no internet connectivity at all.



a sign in front of a house: A satellite dish receives signal from the Starlink internet network in Malden, WashingtonWashington Emergency Management Division


© Provided by The Independent
A satellite dish receives signal from the Starlink internet network in Malden, WashingtonWashington Emergency Management Division

In April, the billionaire entrepreneur said that 800 satellites would be enough for “significant” global coverage, though speeds will be nowhere near the 100 megabits per second speed promised by SpaceX until the network grows.

“With performance that far surpasses that of traditional satellite internet, and a global network unbounded by ground infrastructure limitations, Starlink will deliver high-speed broadband internet to locations where access has been unreliable, expensive, or completely unavailable,” Starlink’s website states.

Areas that will fall within the public beta test include the Detroit metropolitan area

Love autumn? This website is looking to pay 3 people to test out fall candles

If you love autumn, this may be your dream job.

Lifestyle platform Wishlisted.com says it’s looking to pay three fall fanatics to put their sense of smell to work, testing out different candle brands and scents.

The three people chosen will receive $250, a cozy blanket, an assortment of candles based on their preferences, and a $50 Starbucks gift card for all the pumpkin spice lattes they want.

The website says you’re the perfect fit if you love candles, are obsessed with fall, have strong opinions, can receive deliveries of multiple packages, are over 18 years old and are a U.S. resident.

“At Wishlisted, our goal is to provide people with the best resources to help them make the most of this fall season,” said Dayne Ford, Founder and CEO of Wishlisted.com. “And since this year will be a bit different from years past, given the effects of COVID-19, we want to give people the joyful feeling of fall from the comfort of their own homes. This contest allows three lucky winners to earn money simply by smelling candles – they will tell us what they think is best and we will turn that into content that all of our readers can enjoy.”

If you’re interested in this unique job, you can apply here by submitting your information and explaining why you’re the perfect person to take on the task.

appId : '283504728416642',

xfbml : true, version : 'v2.9' }); }; (function(d, s, id){ var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) {return;} js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

Source Article

Here are the top European startups where people want to work in 2020

  • LinkedIn published its Top Startups of 2020, which features the startups its users most want to work for in different countries.
  • Featured companies in Europe include transportation startups such as Arrival and Dott; neo-banks such as Revolut and N26; and health startups like Doctolib.
  • We’ve got exclusive data on the top startups across six European countries, and ranked the first five for each.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

LinkedIn has released its annual ranking of the hottest startups to work for.

The list is based on how half a billion LinkedIn users interact with startups on the site across four areas: user engagement with the company and its employees, employee growth, job applications started on LinkedIn, and how often people working for firms on LinkedIn’s top companies list — a different list of firms with over 500 employees — move over to these startups. 

Business Insider got exclusive data from LinkedIn on its top-ranked startups across six European countries — the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, and the Netherlands.

To be eligible for the list, companies had to be founded in the last seven years, privately held, and headquartered in the country on whose list they appear. The firms had to have a minimum of 50 employees — so the list excludes some smaller startups. 

Scroll down to see the list of the top 30 startups across Europe. We’ve ranked the top five from each of the six European countries below. 

The UK

Arrival is the top startup in the UK

Founded in 2015, Oxford-based startup Arrival is working on prototypes for electric vehicles including buses and delivery vans.

Arrival’s position in the ranking reflects the rise of electric vehicle sales in Europe in the first quarter of 2020. According to the latest McKinsey report, the number