Huawei is in talks to sell part of its Honor smartphone unit

honor 30 pro plus review rear in hand

  • Huawei is reportedly in talks to sell off parts of its Honor unit.
  • It’s believed that Digital China, TCL, and Xiaomi are interested in the deal.

US sanctions against Huawei mean that the company’s smartphone business has suffered in a big way. Between its crippled in-house chipset division and the lack of Google support, it’s becoming increasingly tough for the firm to keep producing phones.

These troubles extend to its Honor sub-brand too, but Reuters now reports that Huawei is in talks to sell off parts of the Honor business in a deal potentially worth up to 25 billion yuan (~$3.7 billion).

The report, citing “people with knowledge of the matter,” alleges that Honor’s brand, research and development infrastructure, and associated supply chain management business could be sold under the deal. However, the newswire’s sources caution that this hasn’t been finalized yet.

It’s believed that Huawei will focus on higher-end phones due to the US sanctions. Honor has traditionally been focused on young and/or budget-conscious consumers.

Who would do Huawei the honor, then?

Reuters reports that Honor phone distributor Digital China is considered a front-runner for the deal. However, the newswire adds that TCL and Xiaomi are also in the running.

Selling part of Honor to another business theoretically means that US sanctions wouldn’t apply to Honor-branded devices produced as part of this arrangement. It isn’t immediately clear what this would mean for Honor devices released prior to a sale though.

Please wait..Loading poll

Furthermore, there’s no guarantee that the US government wouldn’t simply play whack-a-mole and apply sanctions to any company that acquires part of Honor. Huawei and Honor are intertwined in several ways, particularly when it comes to components used and research and development. So extricating large chunks of the sub-brand from its parent company will likely be a

E-Commerce In The Age Of Covid-19 Part One: Advances In Merchant Software

This article is the first article of a three-part series on e-commerce addressing the merchant experience, improving consumer experience, and the next generation of technology

Covid-19’s impact on American retailers has been massive — not just in terms of lost income or jobs, but also the accelerated rise in e-commerce volume. Online retail, which had previously taken more than a decade to reach 16%, leapfrogged to 27% in the 2 months following the onset of Covid. Experts forecast this growth will only continue, magnifying the opportunity for e-commerce but also the challenges ahead.

For merchants, the rapid shift from in-store to online has made an e-commerce platform a business necessity. Retailers that had previously sat on the sidelines are now forced to reckon with a new reality. Meanwhile, those that already had strong web platforms are quickly working to improve them. Regardless of their prior embrace of the stage of e-commerce, all retailers now recognize that a dynamic online presence is critical to survival. They also recognize that shifting toward online comes with new complications.

That’s where software companies have an important role to play. This year has seen a surge of new software offerings aimed at modernizing, expanding and fixing shortcomings in merchants’ online platforms. Even though e-commerce technology remains a work in progress, the pace of progress has been brisk.

Take fraud for example, which becomes more complex and more prevalent as shoppers are no longer physically present at checkout. Credit card fraud is easier to execute online than in a store, making it a serious pain point for retail. And a costly one, at that. Merchants are responsible for fraud prevention and have to deal with the ultimate compromise of taking on more risk or tightening controls with the consequence of turning away paying customers. Fraud eats

Coding Is Just A Small Part Of Computer Science: SP Robotic Works’ Sneha Priya


bg pranav&sneha_sp robotic worksImage: P Ravi Kumar

Sneha Priya’s mantra to introduce any technology is simple: the right exposure at the right age. “It must not be the other way around—just making it compulsory for the kids,” says cofounder of SP Robotic Works. Decoding the hysteria around coding for children in India, Priya concedes that the way it (coding) is being communicated to the parents, and the kind of FOMO being created, is probably not going in the right direction. “But if a kid embraces coding, it will be useful for her future,” she says. 

Started in 2012 by Pranavan and Sneha Priya, SP Robotic Works is an online edutainment company that specialises in providing experiential learning to students between the ages of 7 and 17, in latest technologies such as robotics, coding, drone, AI, VR and IoT. The idea is to promote STEM education (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) through AI-powered online learning platforms. “We have robotic courses designed in such a way that the child gets an exposure to all the components at an early age,” she says.

SP Robotic Works, which has over 80 branches across India apart from overseas presence, added one lakh students post pandemic. Stressing that the problem in the education system starts from an early age, when a child doesn’t get exposure or is not empowered to make the right choice later on, Priya contends that there are millions of engineers who made wrong decisions in opting for such a profession. “They were not given the right exposure at the right age,” she says, adding that career changes could’ve happened if the child had been exposed to options early on. Today, she lets on, if you ask any engineer or anybody the reason to opt for engineering, all of them will say it was

The Ultimate Guide To Starting A Side Hustle Part 6: Marketing

When you are starting a side hustle, one of the most important things you can do for your business is market. But marketing can get pretty out of control if not planned strategically. The first thing you need to do is make sure your marketing is synergistic with your sales plan. 

Years ago, I worked for an ad agency in San Diego. Out of the blue someone called our office and asked to speak to the media buyer – which was me. I answered the call and it was a local plumber, who serviced commercial buildings and businesses. He wanted to know if we could create an ad for his business to shine on the side of building at night – because he saw this done in Las Vegas the weekend before and thought it was clever. 

So I asked him, “This particular ad would only be seen during evening hours – half of each day, with very little exposure during the middle of the night, correct?”

“Uh, yeah, I guess so,” he replied.

I then asked, “Do you know how many of your prospects – business owners or commercial property managers – drive past this particular building during evening hours to see it?” 

“Um, no,” he said.

“Are there other media outlets that your prospect might consume that isn’t just shown overnight, in one spot in town and has more data we could look at?” I asked. 

“Probably. I’ll call you back.” 

Not surprising, but he never called back. What he thought was a clever marketing tactic was completely out of line for his business and would be a total waste of his marketing dollars. It’s wildly important that your marketing support your sales efforts when you have a side hustle. 

Typically when starting out marketing dollars are sparse,

Ten Reasons Why Big Firms Stick With Obsolete Management (Part 2)

Following the first five of Ten Reasons Why Big Firms Stick With 20th Century Management, here are five more reasons:

1. The Transition To 21st Century Management Is Hard Work

Stopping the momentum of the giant flywheel of 20th Century management and turning it into something more agile can involve a lot of work. Everything in 21st Century management is the opposite of 20th Century management.

The goal of the firm is now to create a continuous stream of value for customers and users. Making money is the result, not the goal. This goal requires a different structure of work to enable the full talents of those doing the work, often through small self-organizing teams working in short cycles, focused tightly on delivering value for customers. Instead of a steep vertical hierarchy of authority, there is a flat network or hierarchy of competence, in which ideas can  come from anywhere.

These three principles in turn require radically different processes. Leadership has to be inspirational rather transactional, and, given the distributed nature of work, it is required throughout the organization. Strategy tends to include not only coping with competition but also creating new businesses that attract new customers. Innovation encompasses systematic efforts to find new needs and new ways of meeting them, including the creation of interactive ecosystems. Sales and marketing involve making a real difference in the lives of customers and users. Given the new role of talent, people management must attract and enable the talent required to deliver value to customers. Because the firm operates as a network of teams tightly focused on creating customer value, the budget typically reflects decisions already taken in strategy; there