CommScope to Demonstrate 10G Virtualized Networks and In-Home Experiences at SCTE

HFC network evolution, Wi-Fi 6E connected home, experts in 17 presentations and panels

CommScope announced that it will demonstrate its vision for 10G and virtualized networks as well as the in-home experiences that will follow—at this year’s SCTE Cable-Tec Expo.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201012005469/en/

CommScope to Demonstrate 10G Virtualized Networks and In-Home Experiences at SCTE (Graphic: Business Wire)

CommScope’s demonstrations will center around key advancements in operator solutions for the access network and the connected home. In the industry’s drive to 10G and virtualization, CommScope is leading the way with its Virtual Headend Portfolio, offering a complete range of solutions for virtualizing the four primary planes of modern operator networks: data, video, control, and management. In addition, CommScope’s Fixed Wireless Access (FWA) demonstrations will show the technology’s ability to unlock the potential of 5G to compete with fixed-line services in urban and sub-urban areas.

As operators continue to evolve their HFC networks, pushing physical processing to the fiber node, CommScope is adding a new range of Distributed Access Architecture (DAA) solutions to its portfolio to address the need for a greater density of more powerful node-based Remote PHY and Remote MACPHY devices. These solutions enable operators—like Mediacom, which deployed CommScope’s full end-to-end solution in its 10G trial network—to take the next step in evolving their HFC networks. In particular, the E6000r family of R-PHY Shelf products is making deployment faster and easier—powering the shift towards DAAs and virtualized networks for leading global operators like Norlys(Stofa), Tele Columbus AG and Vidanet.

  • Following on from a prior announcement, Norlys (Stofa) is adding new innovation to their R-PHY network which is currently leveraging the E6000 Core and NC2000 R-PHY nodes. The network operator is deploying CommScope’s R-PHY Shelf solution which is highly

New Apple ‘iPhone 12’ to offer 5G speeds U.S. networks can’t deliver

By Supantha Mukherjee and Kenneth Li

(Reuters) – 5G will finally get its U.S. closeup with the expected debut of Apple Inc’s next iPhone on Tuesday. But the blazing speeds promised will not materialize for most people.

The device, dubbed the iPhone 12 by analysts, can tap into 5G, or fifth generation wireless technology, that theoretically operates as much as 10 to 20 times faster than current 4G wireless networks.

Using the next iPhone or any 5G enabled device on today’s network, however, will be “like having a Ferrari … but using it in your local village and you can’t drive to up to 200 miles per hour, simply because the roads cannot maintain those speeds,” explained Boris Metodiev, associate director of research firm Strategy Analytics.

Apple, which is expected to unveil the new phone at a virtual event on Tuesday, will need to walk a tightrope between enticing consumers to upgrade their phones while not over-promising what 5G can do today.

Current 5G U.S. networks mostly use low-band wireless spectrum, or airspace, that is slower than high-band spectrum, but more reliable over longer distances. It will likely take years before the massive speed boost phone carriers promise will make augmented reality and real-time cloud gaming seamless.

Several U.S. telecom operators have deployed networks based on lower spectrum bands, with slightly higher speeds than 4G. A noticeably faster variant of “mid-band” 5G is also being rolled out, but it is unlikely to reach three-quarters of Americans until 2025, estimated longtime Apple analyst Gene Munster of venture capitalist firm Loup Ventures.

The fastest speeds touted by carriers are a type of 5G called millimeter Wave, or mmWave, that work over shorter distances. Verizon Communications Inc has the largest current mmWave network, available only in limited areas.

Although Verizon 5G users could

Verizon, T-Mobile launch home Internet services powered by 4G LTE networks in rural San Diego County

New 5G networks were supposed to be the battleground where wireless carriers began competing with cable and fiber providers in the home Internet market.

But with ultra-fast 5G not widely available yet, both Verizon and T-Mobile have recently rolled out home Internet services powered by their 4G LTE cellular networks.

These 4G broadband offerings aren’t promising blazing-fast speeds. But they are relatively inexpensive and target more rural areas where sluggish DSL Internet service is common.

Last week, Verizon rolled out LTE Home Internet in rural communities in 48 states. It promises download speeds of 25 megabits per second on average, with upload links at 3 to 5 megabits. It’s unlimited, meaning there are no data usage caps.

Verizon’s LTE Home costs $40 per month for people who are current Verizon Wireless customers, and $60 per month for people who aren’t. Subscribers also need to buy a $240 router, which can be purchased in monthly installments over two years.

“We built this product off of our existing 4G LTE network, and we are offering it in places where we have capacity in our network to support this kind of experience while maintaining the mobile experience that we have,” said Brian Danfield, vice president of Verizon 5G commercialization.

Verizon Wireless is offering home Internet service through its 4G LTE network.

FILE – This June 4, 2014, file photo shows signage at a Verizon Wireless retail store at Downtown Crossing in Boston. Verizon, the nation’s largest wireless provider, reports quarterly financial results on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

(The Associated Press)

LTE Home is available in areas where Verizon doesn’t offer its fiber-optic FiOS Internet service or its millimeter-wave 5G Home product. The company provided a list of zip codes where the service is available, including San Diego County backcountry communities such as Julian, Dulzura, Pala, Valley Center and Warner Springs.

“It

Five bar and cafe owners arrested in France for running no-log WiFi networks

cafe bar

Image: Tony Lee

In one of the weirdest arrests of the year, at least five bar and cafe managers from the French city of Grenoble were taken into custody last week for running open WiFi networks at their establishments and not keeping logs of past connected users.

The bar and cafe owners were arrested for allegedly breaking a 14-year-old French law that dictates that all internet service providers must keep logs on all their users for at least one year.

According to local media reports [1, 2, 3], the bar and cafe owners claimed they were not aware that such a law even existed, let alone that it applied to them as they had not received notifications from their union, which usually sends alerts of industry-wide legal requirements.

Nonetheless, French media pointed out that the law’s text didn’t only apply to internet service providers (ISPs) in the broad meaning of the word — as in telecommunications providers — but also to any “persons” who provide internet access, may it be free of charge or via password-protected networks.

The bar and cafe owners were eventually released after questioning.

According to French law number 2006-64, they now risk up to one year in prison, a personal fine of up to €75,000, and a business fine of up to €375,000.

Connection logging is a feature supported on most commercial routers and has been added for this specific reason, as countries around the world began introducing data logging laws for their local ISPs.

Law enforcement agencies often rely on these logs to track down malicious behavior or details about suspects using public WiFi networks to commit crimes.

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U.S. state, local election computer networks still vulnerable to hacks

WASHINGTON — In a little-noticed episode in 2016, an unusual number of voters in Riverside, California, complained that they were turned away at the polls during the primary because their voter registration information had been changed.



a group of people in a room


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The Riverside County district attorney, Mike Hestrin, investigated and determined that the voter records of dozens of people had been tampered with by hackers. Hestrin said this week that federal officials confirmed his suspicions in a private conversation, saying the details were classified.

Last year, a cybersecurity company found a software flaw in Riverside County’s voter registration lookup system, which it believes could have been the source of the breach. The cybersecurity company, RiskIQ, said it was similar to the vulnerability that appears to have allowed hackers — Russian military hackers, U.S. officials have told NBC News — to breach the voter rolls in two Florida counties in 2016.

RiskIQ analysts said they assess that a vulnerability may still exist in Riverside and elsewhere. The only way to know for sure would be to attempt a hack, something they are not authorized to do. The office of the Riverside County Registrar of Voters did not respond to requests for comment.

“I’m very concerned,” Hestrin said. “I think that our current system has numerous vulnerabilities.”

Officials of the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security have said repeatedly that they have not observed a significant effort by Russian state actors to target election infrastructure this year, and Homeland Security’s top cybersecurity official said this will be the “most protected, most secure” election in American history.

FBI director: Russia trying ‘primarily to denigrate’ Biden in election interference

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Despite government efforts, however, America’s patchwork of state and county election computer networks remains vulnerable to cyberattacks that