Acumen Legal Marketing Offers a Free Guide to Legal Company SEO – Press Release

Acumen Legal Marketing Offers a Free Guide to Legal Company SEO

Acumen Legal Marketing is a leading legal company marketing firm based in Melbourne. The company has offered a free guide to legal company SEO. Currently, this company offers an unmatched guide to local SEO, reputation management, web design, video marketing, PPC, and direct mail.

Acumen Legal Marketing a trusted and recognized legal firm marketing firm in Melbourne that boasts of superior quality services that have offered a free guide to law company SEO. The Melbourne legal marketing firm stated that the manual offers factual and tried techniques, plans, and solutions required to offer unparalleled outcomes and results. The guide is designed for attorneys who want to create a perfect online funnel for local search, media advertising, and conversion rate optimization. 

The company pointed out that the guide has vast and comprehensive details on legal firm marketing. This Melbourne digital marketing firm attested that the guide contains various topics like law firm web design, local SEO, structured data, content generation, local search, on-page SEO optimization, and analytics & optimization. 

Furthermore, this legal firm marketing firm pointed out that the free guide is accessible on their site. Customers who want to get the guide can download it from their site. 

About the Company 

Acumen Legal Marketing is a legal firm marketing company based in Melbourne. The company boasts in helping law companies with the best funnels required for local search, social media, automated lead follow-up, and conversion rate optimization. 

Media Contact
Company Name: Acumen Legal Marketing
Contact Person: Sean Dennin
Email: Send Email
Phone: (321) 361-4199
Address:100 Rialto Place Suite 745
City: Melbourne
State: FL
Country: United States
Website: acumenlegalmarketing.com

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Chinese App Provides Legal Way to Get Over the Great Firewall

(Bloomberg) — A developer backed by Chinese cybersecurity giant 360 Security Technology Inc. has introduced a browser that allows mainland Chinese users to access previously blocked sites like Google and Facebook, partially bypassing Beijing’s Great Firewall.



a close up of a light: Green lights illuminate cable terminals on the Sberbank and SberCloud Christofari supercomputer during an event to mark its launch into commercial operation inside the Sberbank PJSC data processing center (DPC) at the Skolkovo Innovation Center in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, Dec. 16, 2019. As Sberbank expands its technology offerings, the Kremlin is backing legislation aimed at keeping the country's largest internet companies under local control by limiting foreign ownership.


© Bloomberg
Green lights illuminate cable terminals on the Sberbank and SberCloud Christofari supercomputer during an event to mark its launch into commercial operation inside the Sberbank PJSC data processing center (DPC) at the Skolkovo Innovation Center in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, Dec. 16, 2019. As Sberbank expands its technology offerings, the Kremlin is backing legislation aimed at keeping the country’s largest internet companies under local control by limiting foreign ownership.

The browser, named Tuber, requires mobile number registration before use. That makes users’ browsing activities traceable and can identify people because smartphone numbers are linked to unique Chinese identification numbers. Blocked websites that can be accessed via Tuber include YouTube, Instagram and The New York Times.

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The app appears to be providing a government-approved platform for the nation’s 904 million netizens to legally visit overseas websites. Mainland Chinese use virtual private networks, or VPNs, to bypass the Great Firewall — the name given to the entity which has blocked an array of foreign Internet services, from Gmail to Twitter, for over a decade. China regularly cracks down on illegal VPN services, eliminating VPN apps from the stores of both Alphabet Inc.’s Android and Apple Inc.’s iOS.

The app has attracted five million downloads on Huawei Technologies Co.’s app store as of Saturday morning. It has been available for download since at least late September, according to online posts. There are numerous WeChat posts about it, and a reporter from state media outlet Global Times promoted the app in a Twitter post. Tuber is currently only available for Android phones, according

Legal Aid threatens to sue city over lack of internet access for homeless students


A cart is used to hold and organize school-owned laptops to be distributed to students at a Manhattan elementary school in March. | Getty Images

A cart is used to hold and organize laptops to be distributed to students at a Manhattan elementary school in March. | Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

The Legal Aid Society is threatening to sue the de Blasio administration for failing to provide internet access to homeless children in shelters, effectively blocking their ability to participate in remote learning during Covid-19.

Legal Aid and the law firm Milbank, representing the Coalition for the Homeless, sent a demand letter on Thursday to schools Chancellor Richard Carranza and Department of Homeless Services Administrator Joslyn Carter, calling on the city to remedy internet access problems at the Flatlands Family Residence in Brooklyn and other DHS facilities with school-age children.

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“In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, internet access is not a luxury; it is a basic prerequisite to entering the ‘virtual classroom’ that has been necessitated by the virus,” the letter, shared with POLITICO, said. “By neglecting to ensure that homeless children can connect to the internet, the City is in violation of its constitutional obligation to provide a ‘sound basic education.’”

The de Blasio administration partnered with Apple earlier this year to provide iPads to students in shelters and contracted with T-Mobile to provide cellular data on those devices. But these efforts “soon proved to be of little or no use to many children,” the letter said, because shelters like the Flatlands facility lack reliable cell service in the building.

For Crystal Boyd, a resident of the Flatlands shelter who has two teenage children, the issue has been “very frustrating.”

Her son, 15, is in high school, while her daughter, 18, is attending college remotely.

Her daughter had to finish a paper due at midnight on a recent night sitting outside the building because of connectivity issues inside, and her son has had to

Pulse Ox Company Masimo Accuses Apple of Delaying Legal Battle to Sell More Apple Watches

Back in January, medical device company Masimo levied a lawsuit against Apple, accusing the company of stealing trade secrets and improperly using Masimo inventions related to health monitoring in the Apple Watch.


Masimo is known for its pulse oximetry devices, and Apple just recently debuted the Apple Watch Series 6 with blood oxygen monitoring capabilities. Following the launch of the Series 6, Masimo has accused Apple of attempting to delay the legal proceedings in order to sell more watches and gain a more dominant share of the smart watch market.

As highlighted by Bloomberg, Apple has not officially responded to the original January lawsuit, instead filing requests to dismiss the trade secret part of the case and to have Masimo patents invalidated. Apple has asked the trial court to put the case on hold until the patent issue is resolved, which could take a significant amount of time.

Apple told the court that delaying the case until a patent review will narrow the issues and “reduce wasted resources.” With no hold, the first hearing on the case will take place in April 2021.

According to Masimo, the potential postponement would allow Apple to “seize on a critical window of opportunity to capture an emerging field,” using its “considerable resources and ecosystem” to capture market share with no regard for Masimo patent technology.

Masimo CEO Joe Kiani said in the filing that Masimo believes Apple’s customers see the Series 6 as a “medical product,” which can “harm consumers” and “reduce [Masimo’s] opportunities to sell truly clinical-grade products to consumers.”

Masimo accused Apple of stealing secret information by pretending to have a working relationship with Masimo and then poaching Masimo employees. Masimo also believes that Apple is infringing on 10 Masimo patents, and says that Apple relied on Masimo technology when

Trump likely overstepped legal authority with TikTok download ban

President Trump potentially breached legal authority by issuing an emergency order to remove TikTok from U.S. app stores, according to a federal judge that granted an injunction against the directive on Sunday.

U.S. District Court Judge Carl Nichols of the District of Columbia in an opinion released on Monday said Trump “likely exceeded the lawful bounds” of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, reports Variety. A day earlier, Nichols granted an injunction to halt the impending ban.

The IEEPA allows the president to deem an entity “an unusual and extraordinary threat, which has its source in whole or substantial part outside the United States, to the national security, foreign policy, or economy of the United States.” Designed solely for emergency action, the act provides authority to freeze assets and circumvent transactions related to the threatening agency.

As Nichols notes, however, there are two exceptions to the IEEPA and both apply to TikTok. The law does not allow for the regulation or prohibition of “the importation or exportation of information or informational materials'” or “personal communication[s], which do[] not involve a transfer of anything of value,” the report said, citing Nichols.

In its emergency request for an injunction, TikTok aligned its operation with the exclusionary language by comparing itself to a “news wire feed.” Nichols agreed and in his opinion wrote that a ban would “indirectly’ regulate’ the transmission of informational materials’ by U.S. persons.”

“To be sure, the ultimate purpose of those prohibitions is to protect the national security by preventing China from accessing that data and skewing content on TikTok,” Nichols said. “But Plaintiffs have demonstrated that they are likely to succeed on their claim that the prohibitions constitute indirect regulations of personal communication[s]’ or the exchange of information or informational materials.'”

Further, the