Here’s How a Justice Amy Coney Barrett Could Affect Entrepreneurs


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This week, Supreme Court confirmation hearings got underway for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s controversial, last-minute pick to fill Justice Ruth Ginsburg’s seat. Barrett’s pro-life stance and potential willingness to overturn Roe v. Wade has been the main topic of discussion. But where does she stand when it comes to business interests — for big and small companies — and protections for employees? Or contract workers? 

A recent study found that one-third of Americans now work in the $1.2 trillion freelance economy — a figure that’s ballooned 22 percent since 2019. On November 10, the Supreme Court will hear arguments on the fate of the Affordable Care Act, which provides health insurance to millions of Americans who don’t get it through their employers, as well as small-business owners (with under 50 employees) who use the public marketplace to provide insurance to their employees. According to the Commonwealth Fund, “More than 5.7 million small-business employees or self-employed workers are enrolled in the ACA marketplaces; more than half of all ACA marketplace enrollees are small-business owners, self-employed individuals, or small-business employees.” In 2017 Barrett wrote that she disagreed with Chief Justice John Roberts’ decision to uphold the ACA, and if she’s confirmed before the election it’s likely she’ll have a say in the case.

It’s widely understood that the current Supreme Court is “pro-business.” But this traditionally translates to pro-corporate business, and according to an analysis done by Rocket Lawyer, Barrett is set to become the court’s most “pro-business” justice. The analysis looked at Supreme Court opinions from 2018 to now, “in cases where business interests are in conflict with consumer, employee, or other non-corporate interests.” Then, Rocket Lawyer looked at Barrett’s opinions on the Seventh Court of Appeals during the same period and found

U.S. Department Of Justice Reveals Growing Bitcoin And Crypto National Security Threat Could Herald ‘Oncoming Storm’

Bitcoin and cryptocurrency use by terrorists, rogue nations and other criminals has grown in recent years—with high-profile attacks drawing international attention.

The illicit use of bitcoin and cryptocurrency ranges from money laundering and tax evasion to extortion, with cyber criminals increasingly demanding bitcoin and crypto payments in ransomware attacks on computer systems.

Now, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has warned the emergence of bitcoin and similar cryptocurrencies is a growing threat to U.S. national security, with the attorney general William Barr’s Cyber-Digital Task Force calling it the “first raindrops of an oncoming storm.”

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“Current terrorist use of cryptocurrency may represent the first raindrops of an oncoming storm of expanded use,” the Cyber-Digital Task Force said in a report that found bitcoin and cryptocurrencies pose an emerging challenge to law enforcement activities. “Cryptocurrency also provides bad actors and rogue nation states with the means to earn profits.”

The DOJ report, titled Cryptocurrency: An Enforcement Framework and published by the Attorney General’s Cyber-Digital Task Force last week, found bitcoin and cryptocurrencies have been used to support terrorism, purchase illicit items, conduct blackmail and extortion, cryptojacking and launder funds.

Investigators also said bitcoin and cryptocurrencies could be “detrimental to the safety and stability of the international financial system.”

The response of U.S. and international law enforcement has been held back by inconsistent regulation country-to-country. The DOJ has spent the last two years determining how best to address these issues, according to the document that “outlines the Department’s response strategies.”

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