Programming error at the root of Ft. Bend Co.’s early vote issues, says county judge

Fort Bend County will extend early voting hours for the rest of the week in response to issues voters faced on day one.

Ft. Bend Co. DA: ‘Too premature’ to call vote errors as intentional

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On Tuesday morning, polling places got off to a rocky start after reported errors became common at multiple locations.

ABC13 received numerous calls and messages from viewers in the county reporting that they weren’t able to vote. Shortly before 9:15 a.m., a precinct judge at a Missouri City polling place said the issue had been resolved and people were able to begin voting.

SkyEye was over the area in Sugar Land, where people were outside City Hall and Smart Financial Centre.

Still, outside of the event center, Fort Bend County Judge KP George said that for at least one hour there was an error in their program, delaying voting.

“Definitely apologize for that inconvenience, and as I understand, the machines are back,” George said. “The Smart Financial where we are right now, it is up and running. We are back online, and I hope there won’t be any distractions for voting. Once again… I just wanted to say sorry for what happened and we will be doing an investigation. We will be holding those responsible for it accountable. What happened is not OK, not acceptable in Fort Bend County.”

George later released this full statement:

I am extremely disappointed with the technical glitches that riddled Fort Bend County Election machines this morning. Remember, people have died for our right to vote. Stay in line or come back at a convenient time – the future of our country depends on us. You have three weeks to vote early. Remember, we have also extended the hours on the last three days

Judge to rule on extending Florida’s voter registration deadline after website crash

A federal judge heard arguments on Thursday morning about extending Florida’s voter registration deadline again after it had already been extended, following issues with the official state website that occurred earlier this week.

The day the site experienced the issue was also the last day residents could register to vote for the Nov. 3 election.

Voting rights groups sued and took the case to court, claiming Secretary of State Laurel Lee’s extension to 7 p.m on Tuesday wasn’t adequate enough to offset the damage caused by the website crash.

Chief U.S. District Judge Mark Walker grilled lawyers for the state and estimated that even with the extension, far fewer Floridians applied to vote on the online system than compared to registrations in the lead-up to the 2018 midterms, according to Fox 13.

“No one wants to get this right more than we do. Our website fell short of the standards that we have set for ourselves. We tried to remedy the situation,” Mohammad Jazil, a lawyer for Lee, told Walker.

Plaintiffs are asking that Walker extend the voting-registration deadline for two days, but he did not immediately issue a decision. One is expected later today, however.

FLORIDA VOTER REGISTRATION WEBSITE EXPERIENCED OUTAGE HOURS BEFORE DEADLINE

The defendants, on the other hand, argued the plaintiff’s proposal would harm the state “far worse than it would benefit the plaintiffs.”

Walker reportedly asked if the issue was so large in scope as to warrant judicial intervention.

Jazil highlighted the fact that two individual plaintiffs in the lawsuit who claimed they were unable to use the website were already registered voters,” Fox 13 reported.

“We had a deadline. It was a generally applicable, widely known deadline. We had a failure of one mechanism to meet that deadline for a portion of one day on

US judge rules Apple could bar Epic Games’s ‘Fortnite’ from App Store

  • A US judge in California ruled Friday that Apple could bar Epic Games’s “Fortnite” game from its App Store, but the tech company must not harm Epic’s developer tools business.
  • “The Court maintains its findings from the temporary restraining order and hereby grants in part and denies in part Epic Games’ motion for a preliminary injunction,” District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers ruled.
  • Last month, Epic Games had filed for a preliminary injunction that would put its game back in the App Store and restore its developer account after Apple terminated Epic Games’ account on its App Store.
  • Epic sued Apple in August alleging anticompetitive behavior. The lawsuit came after Epic rolled out its own payment system in the popular Fortnite video game.
  • Apple does not allow such alternative payment systems and removed Fortnite from the App Store and threatened to terminate Epic’s developer accounts, which would have affected Epic’s other business of selling software used to create games.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

(Reuters) – A federal judge in California on Friday ruled in an injunction request that Apple Inc could bar Epic Games’s “Fortnite” game from its App Store but must not harm Epic’s developer tools business, which includes the “Unreal Engine” software used by hundreds of other video games.

“The Court maintains its findings from the temporary restraining order and hereby grants in part and denies in part Epic Games’ motion for a preliminary injunction,” District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers ruled.

Epic Games and Apple were not immediately available for comment on the ruling.

Last month, Epic Games had filed for a preliminary injunction that would put its game back in the App Store and restore its developer account after the iPhone maker terminated Epic Games’ account on its App Store.

Epic sued Apple in August,

Apple does not need to return Fortnite to App Store, judge rules

SAN FRANCISCO — A federal judge ruled Friday that Apple did not need to reinstate the popular video game Fortnite in its App Store, in a blow to Fortnite’s parent company, Epic Games, which is locked in an antitrust battle with the tech giant over its app store fees and rules.

Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers of the Northern District of California said in her ruling that Apple’s ban of the game could continue because Epic had violated its contract with Apple. There is “significant public interest” in requiring companies to adhere to contracts or resolve disputes through the normal course, she wrote.

But Gonzales Rogers also said that Apple could not ban Unreal Engine, Epic’s developer tools, from its platforms because of the “potential significant damage to both developers and gamers” who rely on the software.

The mixed ruling showed the high cost of taking on a tech behemoth like Apple, even for an established company like Epic. The 116 million people who have accessed Fortnite through Apple’s systems will continue to be kept away while Epic and Apple prepare for a trial in the case, which is scheduled for May.

An Epic spokeswoman said the company “is grateful that Apple will continue to be barred from retaliating against Unreal Engine and our game development customers.” Epic will continue developing for Apple’s platforms and “pursue all avenues to end Apple’s anti-competitive behavior,” she said.

Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Epic’s battle with Apple comes as the largest tech companies face scrutiny of their power. On Tuesday, House lawmakers said Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google had exercised and abused their monopoly power to stifle competition and harm consumers and recommended that the companies be restructured. European regulators have also opened an investigation into whether Apple’s app

U.S. judge rules Apple could bar Epic Games’s ‘Fortnite’ from App Store

(Reuters) – A federal judge in California on Friday ruled in an injunction request that Apple Inc AAPL.O could bar Epic Games’s “Fortnite” game from its App Store but must not harm Epic’s developer tools business, which includes the “Unreal Engine” software used by hundreds of other video games.

“The Court maintains its findings from the temporary restraining order and hereby grants in part and denies in part Epic Games’ motion for a preliminary injunction,” District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers ruled.

Epic Games and Apple were not immediately available for comment on the ruling.

Last month, Epic Games had filed for a preliminary injunction that would put its game back in the App Store and restore its developer account after the iPhone maker terminated Epic Games’ account on its App Store.

Epic sued Apple in August, claiming that the company’s 30% commission on some in-app purchases made through its App Store, combined with Apple’s controls over what apps users can download to their iPhones, constituted anticompetitive behavior. The lawsuit came after Epic rolled out its own payment system in the popular Fortnite video game.

Apple does not allow such alternative payment systems and removed Fortnite from the App Store and threatened to terminate Epic’s developer accounts, which would have affected Epic’s other business of selling software used to create games.

Epic moved to stop Apple from taking both steps. The judge previously issued an emergency order that allowed Apple to pull Epic’s titles from the App Store but barred the iPhone maker from taking any action that would harm Epic’s developer tools.

“Epic Games has strong arguments regarding Apple’s exclusive distribution through the iOS App Store, and the in-app purchase (“IAP”) system through which Apple takes 30% of certain IAP payments”, the judge said in