Software Engineering Is Shaping The Jobs Of Tomorrow, Here’s How

This article is sponsored by Billy Blue College of Design at Torrens University Australia.

Software engineering is an ever expanding frontier, full of constant innovation. Over the past decade, the industry’s growth has been skyrocketing globally. In Australia, the industry has grown by an annualised 11.4% since 2015.

Think about it – when was the last time you went an entire day without using some form of software? From listening to your favourite music on Spotify, to playing a round of Overwatch and tapping your debit card to pay for your morning coffee, these everyday tasks wouldn’t be possible without someone creating the software that makes them run.

In an article discussing the future of software engineering, Maryville University noted that, “As businesses of all kinds rely more heavily on computer-driven processes, it’s up to software engineers to design, maintain, and innovate these infrastructures.”

“Software engineer” as a role is a bit of a vague term. What type of software are you engineering, exactly? As more and more industries are implementing innovations in computer, so too are the available options. According to TeachBeacon, the sectors where these innovations could be most implemented include retail, health care, research and development, business, Silicon Valley high-tech, government, and defence.

Due to this variety of sectors, there are plenty of options for applying software skills. If you love videogames, you can become a game programmer; if you have an interest in digital media, you can apply your skills to the field of UX and web design – or if you love tech but don’t want to program, take the lead and consider a role in digital transformation.

One of the hottest fields of software engineering is the increased development of artificial intelligence. While the automation of jobs may cause the displacement of human-workers

Tech Dominates FlexJob’s Top 50 Companies Hiring For Remote Jobs

  • 24 of the top 50 companies who posted the most remote job openings on FlexJobs between March 1 and September 15, 2020, are software and technology-based.
  • Atlassian, Amazon, Collabera, CrowdStrike, Oracle, Red Hat, Tanium and Twilio are a few of the many tech companies actively looking to fill remote-based job positions today.  
  • Amazon has 949 open work-from-home positions open today on their Amazon Jobs site, 287 of which are for Solution Architect roles, 99 in Software Development and 83 in Project/Program/Product Management Non-Tech.   

FlexJobs is one of the leading sites and subscription services specializing in verified high quality, remote and flexible jobs. They have seen an increase of more than 50% in remote job listings in the areas of Computer/IT, Customer Service, Accounting & Finance, Project Management, Marketing and Sales this year. Tech companies’ need for remote workers is the most pervasive, with 24 of the 50 actively looking to fill open positions. Healthcare is the next-highest industry, with seven of the 50 companies looking to bring remote-based hires onboard.  

The recruitment site is also seeing an increase in the number of new companies recruiting remote workers. The site reports they’ve seen a 10% increase in Q2 over Q1 and a 53% increase in new companies in Q3 over Q2. They recently completed an analysis of the top 50 companies who have posted the most remote job openings between March 1 and September 15, 2020. You can find the analysis here: Top 50 Companies Hiring for Remote Jobs During the Pandemic.

The following are the tech companies who have posted the most remote job openings on the FlexJobs site this year:

  • Atlassian – Currently has 124 open remote

Broadband Internet Pilot to Support Access to Healthcare, Jobs and Education for Thousands in Rural Virginia

– Projects in the Northern Neck, Surry and Botetourt counties will help bridge the digital divide in Virginia through partnerships with Internet Service Providers

– Pilot projects will help improve economic and education opportunities related to broadband access in unserved areas of Virginia, if approved

– Dominion Energy Virginia to serve as middle mile provider, enabled by the Grid Transformation & Security Act of 2018

RICHMOND, Va., Oct. 9, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Residents in rural parts of Virginia could gain access to broadband internet critical for jobs, healthcare and education under three pilot projects proposed Oct. 1 by Dominion Energy Virginia.  


(PRNewsfoto/Dominion Energy)

Thanks to support from the Virginia General Assembly and collaboration with electric cooperatives and Internet Service Providers, the proposed Rural Broadband Pilot projects would extend broadband internet to citizens in Surry County, Botetourt County and the Northern Neck, if approved by the State Corporation Commission. The proposal includes nearly 300 miles of middle-mile fiber and would cost approximately $29 million to construct.

“With so many Virginians working and learning from home due to COVID-19, access to reliable internet is an absolute necessity,” said Ed Baine, president of Dominion Energy Virginia. “We hope these partnerships are the first of many, and we’re optimistic about how much these efforts could help communities here in our home state.”

More than 500,000 Virginians still live without easy access to high-speed internet. Extending broadband internet access would support economic development, social equity, public safety, educational opportunities, and healthcare services for citizens of the Commonwealth.

In rural areas, it’s not cost effective for Internet Service Providers to lay the fiber necessary to reach less-populated communities with broadband internet. Dominion Energy is in a unique position to help bridge the digital gap. The company is installing new infrastructure as it moves forward

Google contractor accused of offshoring jobs in retaliation for union campaign

Google contractors who recently unionized say their jobs are being slowly shipped to Poland. On Thursday, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) filed a complaint laying out the allegations against HCL America, an engineering and IT contractor that works with Google in Pittsburgh.



a sign on the side of a building


© Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge


Obtained by Motherboard, the complaint argues the jobs are being outsourced in retaliation for legitimate union activity. In particular, the NLRB says the conduct took place “because employees formed, joined and assisted the Union and engaged in concerted activities, and to discourage employees from engaging in these activities.”

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None of the affected workers are legal employees of Google, but they specialize in engineering and IT tasks for HCL. The contractors voted to unionize in 2019, organizing under the United Steelworkers union. According to the complaint, the company has failed to bargain with the newly formed unit and has transferred work previously undertaken by the team to offshore workers in Kraków, Poland.

Google did not respond to a request for comment.

Contract workers have been a significant aspect of employee activism at Google, including a public memo sent in March by full-time employees in March demanding better treatment for the contract workforce.

Temporary, vendor, and contract employees outnumber full-time Google employees, and typically face lower wages and less job security. In May, Google abruptly rescinded more than 2000 incoming contracts, citing cost-cutting measures spurred by the global pandemic. Because the workers were not yet under contract, the measures were not legally considered to be layoffs and the workers were ineligible for unemployment insurance as a result.

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Remote-access software firm LogMeIn cuts jobs

LAYOFFS



a blurry image of a person: LogMeIn


© Essdras M Suarez
LogMeIn

Remote-access software firm LogMeIn cuts jobs

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One of the industry leaders in software for remote work is going through another round of layoffs. Boston-based LogMeIn said it’s trimming “less than 100” of its global workforce of 4,000, with Boston workers accounting for “less than 20” of the job cuts. The company provided no details about which of its product lines are affected, but a spokeswoman said that the laid-off workers have been encouraged to apply for new jobs at LogMeIn, suggesting that the move is more of a reorganization than a downsizing. In February, the firm laid off about 300 employees, or 8 percent of its workforce. Chief executive Bill Wagner told the Globe in July that many of the company’s employees will keep working from home even after the pandemic lifts. A spokeswoman said that as a result, LogMeIn needs fewer workers to operate its offices, such as the technical staff who maintain the office computer networks. — HIAWATHA BRAY

DIVERSITY

Microsoft plan to add Black executives draws US Labor inquiry

Microsoft Corp. said the US Labor Department is questioning whether its commitment to promote more Black managers and executives violates civil rights laws. The software maker said it’s confident the diversity pledges are legal. The company, whose contracts with the US government mean it must comply with certain federal requirements on employment practices, said it was contacted last week by the Labor Department’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs. Microsoft said in June that it would double the number of Black managers, senior contributors, and senior leaders in the United States by 2025. The federal outreach to Microsoft is an example of the Trump administration’s opposition to many programs meant to fight discrimination against the Black community and improve the