Kevin Rudd’s Petition To Investigate Murdoch Broke The Australian Government’s Website

The Ex-PM’s petition calling for a royal commission into the influence of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp is proving rather too much for the Australian Parliamentary website. So many users have reported problems trying to sign it that even the site itself admits it’s in trouble.

The Rudd Petition is having a hard time

Kevin Rudd’s petition calls for a Royal Commission into the influence of News Corporation on the Australian media landscape. While the merits of that approach are certainly debatable as a control measure, what’s not debateable is that it’s proved conceptually very popular indeed. At the time of writing some 88,747 people had signed, according to the APH web site.

That number might be much higher, however, with numerous reports over the weekend that users trying to sign the petition couldn’t. The sheer weight of numbers trying to do so brought the APH website to its knees.

As of Monday, it still appears to be an issue:

It’s proved to be so much of an issue that there’s now a disclaimer on the APH website, stating that:

“We are aware

Kevin Rudd’s Petition To Investigate Murdoch Broke The Australian Government’s Website

The Ex-PM’s petition calling for a royal commission into the influence of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp is proving rather too much for the Australian Parliamentary website. So many users have reported problems trying to sign it that even the site itself admits it’s in trouble.

The Rudd Petition is having a hard time

Kevin Rudd’s petition calls for a Royal Commission into the influence of News Corporation on the Australian media landscape. While the merits of that approach are certainly debatable as a control measure, what’s not debateable is that it’s proved conceptually very popular indeed. At the time of writing some 88,747 people had signed, according to the APH web site.

That number might be much higher, however, with numerous reports over the weekend that users trying to sign the petition couldn’t. The sheer weight of numbers trying to do so brought the APH website to its knees.

As of Monday, it still appears to be an issue:

It’s proved to be so much of an issue that there’s now a disclaimer on the APH website, stating that:

“We are aware

Tyngsborough schools investigate cyberattack – The Boston Globe

A cyberattack at Tynsgborough’s middle and high schools cut Internet service to students this week, and officials have hired an outside company to identify the source of the attack, the school department said.

The outages impacted the two schools located on the district’s Norris Road campus. The school department’s info tech team has determined the outage was not caused internally or through the district’s Internet provider, Superintendent Michael Flanagan said in a statement.

Instead, officials believe the outage was caused by an outside device brought into school buildings either unwittingly or intentionally, the statement said.

Northeast Technology, an IT solutions company in Danvers, has been hired to identify the source of the attack. The town’s police department is also investigating.

The town’s elementary school was not impacted by the attack.

The school district has been operating in a hybrid mode this year, offering a mix of in-person and remote learning for students.

Flanagan said he is “frustrated” and “disappointed” by the attack’s disruption on learning. “We have all pulled together and worked so hard to create a positive learning environment in spite of the challenges and disruptions of the COVID pandemic,” he said.

“While we are confident that we will soon rectify this situation, I am upset for the difficulty and disruption this has caused our students, families, and staff,” Flanagan said.

Students and teachers at both schools worked remotely on Friday and are off Monday due to a school holiday, the statement said. Officials hope in school learning can resume on Tuesday.


Adam Sennott can be reached at [email protected]

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AOC asked the SEC to investigate Palantir ahead of direct listing

  • Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez wrote a letter to the Securities and Exchange Commission asking for the agency to investigate the data-mining company Palantir ahead of its stock-market debut, which it made on Wednesday.
  • Among the congresswoman’s concerns is Palantir’s longtime penchant for secrecy, which she wrote could hurt future investors.
  • Other concerns listed are its domestic and foreign contracts, including with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, law-enforcement agencies, and foreign governments that “may present human rights risks.”
  • Palantir, a famed Silicon Valley startup founded in 2003, has a reputation for being secretive and has come under scrutiny recently ahead of its direct listing.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez wrote a letter to the US Securities and Exchange Commission in mid-September asking the agency to investigate the secretive data firm Palantir as the company gained attention with its stock-exchange plans.

In the letter, the congresswoman listed several concerns pertaining to the Peter Thiel-founded Silicon Valley startup. But her primary grievance was the startup’s failure to fully disclose information regarding its business practices, omissions that could lead to material risks for future investors and national security issues as it begins trading, the letter said.

According to Ocasio-Cortez, one such partial omission was the funding it received from In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture-capital arm. A 2009 shareholder report from Palantir revealed that In-Q-Tel held a 10% share in Palantir, but the firm’s 2020 S-1 filing did not say whether that investment was still in play or how many Palantir shares In-Q-Tel held. Palantir is listed as one of In-Q-Tel’s portfolio companies on the venture group’s website.

Palantir’s contracts with foreign governments were also cited, some of which involve governments “known to engage in corrupt practices and human rights violations,” such as Qatar, Ocasio-Cortez wrote in the letter.

Palantir’s domestic contracts have