InventHelp Inventor Develops Kitchen Gadget to Safely Handle Hot Oven Racks (OCC-1524)

PITTSBURGH, Oct. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — “I needed a better way to remove hot oven racks without burning myself,” said an inventor, from La Palma, Calif., “so I invented the EASY OUT.”

InventHelp Logo (PRNewsfoto/InventHelp)

The invention provides an effective way to adjust, push and pull a hot rack from the oven. In doing so, it eliminates the need to struggle with pot holders. As a result, it helps to prevent burns on the hands and arms and it enhances safety and convenience. The invention features a practical, user-friendly design that is easy to use so it is ideal for households and commercial kitchens. Additionally, it is producible in design variations.

The inventor described the invention design. “My design enables hot oven racks to be safely handled without pot holders.”

The original design was submitted to the Orange County sales office of InventHelp. It is currently available for licensing or sale to manufacturers or marketers. For more information, write Dept. 19-OCC-1524, InventHelp, 217 Ninth Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15222, or call (412) 288-1300 ext. 1368. Learn more about InventHelp’s Invention Submission Services at https://www.InventHelp.com.

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PlayStation Inventor Starts New Career Making Robots for No Pay

(Bloomberg) — Ken Kutaragi, the legendary inventor of the PlayStation gaming console, is taking on one of the hardest jobs in robotics. And he’s getting paid nothing to do it.

The founder of Sony Corp.’s gaming business is the new chief executive officer of Ascent Robotics Inc., a Tokyo-based artificial intelligence startup. Kutaragi, 70, wants to make affordable robots that can safely move around and do physical work alongside humans in factories and logistics centers, and aims to have a working prototype in about a year. He said he receives no salary to save precious capital.



Ken Kutaragi standing in a room: PlayStation Inventor Ken Kutaragi Starts New Career Making Robots


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PlayStation Inventor Ken Kutaragi Starts New Career Making Robots

Ken Kutaragi in Tokyo on Oct. 8.

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Photographer: Kentaro Takahashi/Bloomberg

“The Covid-19 outbreak has turned the old argument about robots taking our jobs on its head,” Kutaragi said in his first interview since taking the helm in August. “It’s pretty clear now that if we want to arrive at a new normal, we need more and more robots in our daily lives.”

The industry veteran is vague about how he plans to accomplish this, other than to say partnerships will be key to moving forward. Ascent has worked with Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. on a robotic arm that can pick parts out of a jumble using a single camera as input. It’s also developing autonomous driving software in collaboration with an unnamed Japanese carmaker. The company uses a combination of data from sensor-studded Lexus hybrids cruising Tokyo’s streets and a simulations where the algorithms are trained to handle so-called edge-case scenarios.

‘Fast and Furious’ Driverless Cars Aren’t as Crazy as They Sound



PlayStation Inventor Ken Kutaragi Starts New Career Making Robots


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PlayStation Inventor Ken Kutaragi Starts New Career Making Robots

A robotic arm picks up a cube at an Ascent Robotics office.

Photographer: Kentaro Takahashi/Bloomberg

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