Nasdaq Women in Technology: Niharika Sharma, Senior Software Engineer, Nasdaq’s Machine Intelligence Lab

Women in Tech: Niharika Sharma

Niharika Sharma is a Senior Software Engineer for Nasdaq’s Machine Intelligence Lab. She designs systems that gather, process and apply machine learning/natural language processing technologies on natural language data, generating valuable insights to support business decisions. Over the past years, she worked on Natural Language Generation (NLG) and Surveillance Automation for Nasdaq Advisory Services. We sat down with Niharika to learn more about how she got her start in computer science and how she approaches challenges in her career.

Can you describe your day-to-day as a senior software engineer at Nasdaq?

My day-to-day work involves collaborating with Data Scientists to solve problems, ideating business possibilities with product teams and working with Data/Software Engineers to transform ideas into solutions.

How did you become involved in the technology industry, and how has technology influenced your role?

My first exposure to Computer Science was a Logo programming class that I took as a junior in high school. After that, I took a couple of coding classes for fun.

When it came to choosing a college major, my high school Mathematics teacher suggested I consider a career in Software Engineering. At first, I thought, “Programming?! That’s too geeky!”. I liked coding, but I never wanted to be that nerd who sits in a cube staring at a computer all day. For college, I chose to study Chemistry at Delhi University, but a few months into the course, I realized technology was where I belonged, and I eventually pivoted to Engineering.

A decade later, I admit that it was the best decision I ever made. I found the concepts and problem solving so engaging that after obtaining my degree, I took a leap of faith and moved to the U.S. to pursue a Masters in Computer Science from Northeastern University. In the final semester, I

Intel, IIIT-Hyderabad, PHFI And Telangana Government Launch Applied Artificial Intelligence Research Center

What’s New: Today at the inaugural all.ai 2020 Virtual Summit, Intel India in collaboration with the government of Telangana, International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad (IIIT-H) and Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) announced the launch of INAI, an applied artificial intelligence (AI) research center in Hyderabad. INAI is an initiative to apply AI to population scale problems in the Indian context, with a focus on identifying and solving challenges in the healthcare and smart mobility segments through strong ecosystem collaboration.

“With its unique strengths of talent, technology, data availability, and the potential for population-scale AI adoption, India has this tremendous opportunity to lead human-centric applications and democratize AI for the world. Our aspiration is to make AI synonymous with India as we strive to achieve the true potential of AI in critical segments like healthcare, smart mobility and the future of work by advancing innovation, research, technology and skills. The launch of the Applied AI Research Center, initiatives to train students on AI readiness skills and the all.ai 2020 Summit reinforce our commitment towards realizing the exponential impact of AI in an inclusive, collaborative and responsible manner.”
–Nivruti Rai, Intel country head for India and vice president of the Data Platforms Group

How It Will Work: INAI will act as a catalyst to accelerate India’s leadership in AI by driving innovation and entrepreneurship, creating national assets such as curated datasets, computing infrastructure, tools and frameworks with the aim to attract global talent for high-impact research towards social sector development. This collaborative effort, championed by Intel and catalyzed by the Government of Telangana, is anchored at IIIT-H and brings multiple institutions together to work on solutions that have societal-scale impact. PHFI is the founding healthcare partner in this initiative.

Why It Matters: As India continues its transformation, adoption

Adobe puts artificial intelligence tools into its marketing software



a close up of a screen: An Adobe Systems Inc software box is seen in Los Angeles


© Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
An Adobe Systems Inc software box is seen in Los Angeles


(Reuters) – Adobe Inc said on Monday that it has put a new set of artificial intelligence tools into its digital marketing software with the aim of helping companies sharpen their marketing campaigns.

Once known for applications like Photoshop, Adobe has become one of the biggest providers of software for running such campaigns, which businesses use to decide which of thousands of images and pieces of written to content to show to potential customers. Growth in its marketing software division has helped send shares up nearly 50% this year.

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The artificial intelligence features released on Monday aid that effort by, for example, scanning and labeling thousand of product images by color and shape, or using natural-language processing technology to read an article to determine its subject.

That makes it easier for marketing campaigns to make a recommendation, whether that means showing a person browsing an e-commerce site a pair of shoes similar to ones they have previously viewed or a news website suggesting a story on a similar subject to the one just read.

Such artificial intelligence technology has existed for several years, but using it generally required corporate marketing departments to export data from their systems and work with another division of the business to use, slowing the work down, Ali Bohra, director of strategy and product marketing for intelligence services at Adobe, said in an interview. Adobe has placed the technologies directly inside the marketing systems, reducing the need to export data.

“When you’re thinking about the need to be agile and work in real time, this is not a process that works very well,” Bohra said.

(Reporting by Stephen Nellis in San Francisco; Editing by Marguerita Choy)

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How Amazon Is Disrupting Robot Intelligence

Bringing a new robot to market is exciting: new capability, new hardware, new services. The problem is when you get to software, where everything feels harder and takes longer than you think it should. Like Tesla’s full self-driving, which has all the hardware and intelligence it needs — with the possible exception of LIDAR — but is perpetually just … about … to … arrive … and even so, was recently savaged by Consumer Reports as buggy and ineffective.

Hardware is necessary, but software provides the animating intelligence that allows it to do useful, efficient, and safe work.

That’s why Nader Elm, CEO of autonomous drone company Exyn Technologies, compared robots today to the iPhone before the App Store: the hardware’s there, but the software layer is immature.

Amazon’s hard at work on that.

And the early results are impressive, with easily 1000X cheaper training that is helping robot makers bring products to market 300X faster … and enabling entire new capabilities.

Listen to the interview for this story on the TechFirst podcast:

The innovation: simulated worlds that let you test your robot in hundreds or thousands of environments much cheaper than ever before. You don’t need thousands of test robots, and you don’t need to run them through tens of thousands of homes (if it’s a home robot) or millions of miles of road (if it’s a delivery robot) or hundreds of stores (if it’s a restocking environment).

Rather, you run your tests in a scalable and extensible environment: the cloud.

Even that was incredibly expensive until recently.

“A single simulation can cost tens of thousands of dollars,” AWS general manager Roger Barga told me a recent TechFirst

ZeroFOX acquires Cyveillance threat intelligence business from LookingGlass

ZeroFOX has acquired LookingGlass Cyber Solutions’ Cyveillance threat intelligence business. 

Announced on Tuesday, the deal is designed to merge the ZeroFOX Digital Risk Protection Platform and Cyveillance’s threat intelligence data trove and dark web intelligence capabilities. 

ZeroFOX says that snapping up the business, previously a subsidiary of LookingGlass, is a strategic move to push the company up the enterprise threat intelligence and protection roster on a global scale.

See also: Leaders of ‘notorious’ Team Xecuter game piracy, homebrew group arrested

Financial details were not disclosed. 

Founded in 1997 and headquartered in Reston, Virginia, Cyveillance was previously acquired by LookingGlass in 2015. 

The company provides clients with online data source analysis and monitoring, including a digital risk protection service, a “data lake” repository containing over two decades’ worth of threat intelligence, open source security projects, as well as investigation and forensics offerings.

“Our merger with the Cyveillance team fulfills our strategic vision of accelerating our position as the definitive worldwide leader in Digital Risk Protection,” said James Foster, ZeroFOX CEO. 

CNET: Amazon doubles down on Echo home security. What to know

Once the merger completes, Gilman Louie, Executive Chairman of LookingGlass, will be joining the ZeroFOX board of directors. 

Existing Cyveillance customers will continue to receive their services as normal and will also be offered access to ZeroFOX solutions. 

“To accelerate the innovation and service delivery for organizations worldwide who depend on us to protect their critical assets, data and accounts on public platforms, we are employing acquisitions as multipliers in our go-forward strategy,” ZeroFOX added. 

The purchase of Cyveillance is ZeroFOX’s first acquisition since its founding in 2013. The company has previously raised over $154 million through multiple investment rounds. 

TechRepublic: How to boost the effectiveness of your cybersecurity operations

Last week, Imperva acquired database security firm jSonar. While financial