Intel aims to streamline supply chain logistics with new DWS lidar software

Intel Corp. today introduced DWS, a new software product that promises streamline the supply chain operations of companies such as retailers by automating the labor-intensive chore of measuring packages’ dimensions and volume.

Intel, best known for its chips, also has a presence in a few other markets. Among others, the company sells a line of enterprise-grade depth cameras under the RealSense brand that can be used for tasks such as equipping industrial robotics with computer vision capabilities. The new DWS software announced today works with the RealSense L515 (pictured), a lidar depth camera introduced last December that Intel touts as the world’s smallest high-resolution lidar camera.

Measuring packages is an important part of running a modern supply chain. Delivery companies need to accurately log items’ size and volume to determine how best to allocate cargo capacity in their trucks. An e-commerce company, meanwhile, can use volume measurements of merchandise in its warehouses as a metric for evaluating inventory availability. These types of measurements also play a role in billing.

The challenge is that packages’ dimensions and volume typically have to be logged manually, which creates inefficiencies for large logistics firms processing millions of items per year. Enter Intel’s DWS software. A warehouse operator or delivery company can pair DWS with a number of RealSense L515 lidar cameras, deploy the cameras in its facilities and automate the measurement process.

Intel says DWS takes less than two seconds to glean a package’s dimensions and volume. It’s accurate to the millimeter, according to the chipmaker, and can measure objects ranging from small boxes measuring a few inches across to full-sized pallets. The RealSense L515 cameras DWS uses to capture this data produce images by gathering up to 23 million so-called depth points per second within their field view.

Besides speeding up measurements, Intel

PC Sales Continue Surging — And That’s Good News for Intel, AMD and Others

PC sales remain on the upswing thanks to purchases made to support remote workers and learners. And it looks as if there’s still a lot of pent-up demand going into the holiday season.

Research firm IDC estimates PC shipments rose 14.6% annually in Q3 to 81.3 million. That compares with 11.2% shipment growth in Q2, and just 2.7% growth in 2019.

Officially, Gartner estimates PC shipments rose just 3.6% to 71.4 million. However, when including Chromebook sales (counted in IDC’s official estimate), Gartner’s estimate for shipment growth rises to 9%.

Along with Chromebooks, Q3 was a strong quarter for gaming PCs and (in certain cases) notebooks with cellular modems, according to IDC. On the flip side, desktop demand was said to be weak in the U.S. and EMEA. Desktop PC sales depend heavily on purchases made to support corporate offices, many of which are of course empty right now.

Demand for gaming products has been strong pretty much across the board in recent months: In September, supplies of graphics cards based on Nvidia’s  (NVDA) – Get Report new GeForce RTX 3080 and 3090 gaming GPUs quickly sold out at major retailers, and Sony  (SNE) – Get Report and Microsoft  (MSFT) – Get Report both saw strong pre-orders for their next-gen consoles.

Between them, top-3 PC OEMs Lenovo, HP  (HPQ) – Get Report and Dell Technologies  (DELL) – Get Report accounted for 61.5% of Q3 shipments, per IDC. Lenovo and HP’s shipments were each estimated to be up more than 11%, while Dell’s shipments, which skew heavily towards corporate buyers, were estimated to have dropped slightly.

Apple  (AAPL) – Get Report, whose Mac revenue rose 22% annually during its June quarter, was estimated to have an 8.5% unit

Intel, IIIT-Hyderabad, PHFI And Telangana Government Launch Applied Artificial Intelligence Research Center

What’s New: Today at the inaugural all.ai 2020 Virtual Summit, Intel India in collaboration with the government of Telangana, International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad (IIIT-H) and Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) announced the launch of INAI, an applied artificial intelligence (AI) research center in Hyderabad. INAI is an initiative to apply AI to population scale problems in the Indian context, with a focus on identifying and solving challenges in the healthcare and smart mobility segments through strong ecosystem collaboration.

“With its unique strengths of talent, technology, data availability, and the potential for population-scale AI adoption, India has this tremendous opportunity to lead human-centric applications and democratize AI for the world. Our aspiration is to make AI synonymous with India as we strive to achieve the true potential of AI in critical segments like healthcare, smart mobility and the future of work by advancing innovation, research, technology and skills. The launch of the Applied AI Research Center, initiatives to train students on AI readiness skills and the all.ai 2020 Summit reinforce our commitment towards realizing the exponential impact of AI in an inclusive, collaborative and responsible manner.”
–Nivruti Rai, Intel country head for India and vice president of the Data Platforms Group

How It Will Work: INAI will act as a catalyst to accelerate India’s leadership in AI by driving innovation and entrepreneurship, creating national assets such as curated datasets, computing infrastructure, tools and frameworks with the aim to attract global talent for high-impact research towards social sector development. This collaborative effort, championed by Intel and catalyzed by the Government of Telangana, is anchored at IIIT-H and brings multiple institutions together to work on solutions that have societal-scale impact. PHFI is the founding healthcare partner in this initiative.

Why It Matters: As India continues its transformation, adoption

UCSF, Fortanix, Intel, and Microsoft Azure Utilize Privacy-Preserving Analytics to Accelerate AI in Healthcare

UC San Francisco’s Center for Digital Health Innovation (CDHI), Fortanix, Intel, and Microsoft Azure today have formed a collaboration to establish a confidential computing platform with privacy-preserving analytics to accelerate the development and validation of clinical algorithms.

The platform will provide a “zero-trust” environment to protect both the intellectual property of an algorithm and the privacy of healthcare data, while CDHI’s proprietary BeeKeeperAI will provide the workflows to enable more efficient data access, transformation, and orchestration across multiple data providers.

Gaining regulatory approval for clinical artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms requires highly diverse and detailed clinical data to develop, optimize, and validate unbiased algorithm models. Algorithms that are used in the context of delivering healthcare must be capable of consistently performing across diverse patient populations, socioeconomic groups, geographic locations, and be equipment agnostic. Few research groups, or even large healthcare organizations, have access to enough high-quality data to accomplish these goals.

“While we have been very successful in creating clinical-grade AI algorithms that can safely operate at the point of care, such as immediately identifying life-threatening conditions on X-rays, the work was time consuming and expensive,” said Michael Blum, MD, associate vice chancellor for informatics, executive director of CDHI and professor of medicine at UCSF. “Much of the cost and expense was driven by the data acquisition, preparation, and annotation activities. With this new technology, we expect to markedly reduce the time and cost, while also addressing data security concerns.”

The organizations will leverage the confidential computing capabilities of Fortanix Confidential Computing Enclave Manager, Intel’s Software Guard Extensions (SGX) hardware-based security capabilities, Microsoft Azure’s confidential computing infrastructure, and UCSF’s BeeKeeperAI privacy preserving analytics to calibrate a proven clinical algorithm against a simulated data set. A clinical-grade algorithm that rapidly identifies those needing blood transfusion in the Emergency Department following trauma will

Further Downside For Intel Stock?

Intel stock (NASDAQ: INTC) is down 12% since the beginning of this year, but at the current price of around $52 per share, we believe that Intel stock could see more downside.

Why is that? Our belief stems from the fact that Intel stock is still up 20% from the low seen at the end of 2017, over 2 years ago, and with Apple switching to their own processors and the delay in Intel’s 7nm chip line, we believe Intel’s stock could drift lower. Our dashboard What Factors Drove 20% Change In Intel Stock Between 2017 And Now? provides the key numbers behind our thinking, and we explain more below.

Intel stock’s rise since late 2017 came due to a 15% rise in revenue, which further translated into a 119% rise in net income. This, combined with a 6% drop in the outstanding share count, led to a 134% rise in earnings per share. Net income rose due to a gradual drop in SG&A expense, and a significantly lower effective tax rate (53% in 2017 to 9.7% in 2018 and 12.5% in 2019).

In addition, Intel’s P/E ratio dropped from 21x in 2017 to 12x in 2019, and has further dropped to 11x currently. However, given the volatility of the current situation, there is further possible downside risk for Intel’s multiple.

So what’s the likely trigger and timing to this downside?

The