Australia’s telco and energy sectors agree to boost infrastructure resiliency

Communications Alliance and Energy Networks Australia (ENA) have signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) to improve the way the two sectors collaborate and share knowledge when responding to emergency situations.

Under the MoU, the pair have agreed to improve the safety of communities by mitigating risks caused by telecommunications or power outages during emergencies, as well as the sustainability of telecommunications and power supply services to communities affected by emergencies to support their recovery.

The MoU also sets out that the two sectors will collaborate and coordinate on preparing telecommunications and electricity networks and infrastructure for responding to emergencies at local, regional, and state level.

A report prepared by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) in May found that during the peak period of the Black Summer bushfires, most telecommunication outages were due to power failures rather than direct fire damage to communication assets.

The report found that during the period from 19 December 2019 to 31 January 2020, only 3% of tower outages were due to fire damage, and of the 1,390 total facilities that were impacted by the fires outages, only 1% of incidents were a direct result of fire damage.

See also: Twitter bots and trolls promote conspiracy theories about Australian bushfires  

Similar findings were disclosed by the company responsible for deploying the National Broadband Network (NBN) across Australia. In June, NBN revealed in response to Senate Estimates Question on Notice that bushfires impacted 1% of all NBN services.

“12% (or 6,367 services) of all services impacted were directly impacted by fire over the duration of the bushfires,” the company said at the time.

“The remaining services were impacted by power outages as a result of the bushfires.”

The federal government has previously announced it would spend AU$37.1 million to improve the resiliency of the nation’s

The Five Forces – The Real Infrastructure Initiative & Seven Companies To Make It Happen

“What I have tried to do with my work is to make baseball more fun,” The Bill James Newsletter, 1985 as quoted in Moneyball, by Michael Lewis

Five forces are critical to driving any infrastructure initiative. Ignore the push or pull of any one of these forces and you weaken your effort, or go nowhere – respect their power and you drive forward. My wife, Ingrid, criticized me over the weekend: “You think about everything in terms of infrastructure.” “But how else are we going to save the country,” I responded. Tunnel vision. But I think that – right now – that is maybe not be a bad thing. This is an extraordinarily chaotic period, we are in what seems like the eye of the hurricane – the next 12 months are likely to be one of the most challenging, and hopefully one of the most creative, periods in our history. Infrastructure is an investment in our future, it brings us together, and it carries us closer to our dreams. To begin, though, we need to understand – differently, with crystal clarity – the five forced, and we need to work out a strategic solution that works for all of us, and that sustains investment, long-term.

Five Forces Defining the Infrastructure Landscape. Much as Michael Porter’s famous five forces defined the competitive intensity of an industry, there are five forces that are critical to how to think about a country’s infrastructure industry – get them wrong and investment will fall, be inconsistent, or ineffective. From 1992 through to 2016 every successful presidential candidate promised, and failed, to drive infrastructure forward. By organizing strategy around these five forces the next Administration can – intensely, perhaps even ruthlessly

France’s Health Data Hub to move to European cloud infrastructure to avoid EU-US data transfers

France’s data regulator CNIL has issued some recommendations for French services that handle health data, as Mediapart first reported. Those services should avoid using American cloud hosting companies altogether, such as Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud.

Those recommandations follow a landmark ruling by Europe’s top court in July. The ruling, dubbed Schrems II, struck down the EU-US Data Privacy Shield. Under the Privacy Shield, companies could outsource data processing from the EU to the US in bulk. Due to concerns over US surveillance laws, that mechanism is no longer allowed.

The CNIL is going one step further by saying that services and companies that handle health data should also avoid doing business with American companies — it’s not just about processing European data in Europe. Once again, this is all about avoiding falling under U.S. regulation and rulings.

The regulator sent those recommendations to one of France’s top courts (Conseil d’État). SantéNathon, a group of organizations and unions, originally notified the CNIL over concerns about France’s Health Data Hub.

France is currently building a platform to store health data at the national level. The idea is to build a hub that makes it easier to study rare diseases and use artificial intelligence to improve diagnoses. It is supposed to aggregate data from different sources and make it possible to share some data with public and private institutions for those specific cases.

The technical choices have been controversial as the French government originally chose to partner with Microsoft and its cloud platform Microsoft Azure.

Microsoft, like many other companies, relies on Standard Contractual Clauses for EU-US data transfers. But the Court of Justice of the EU has made it clear that EU regulators have to intervene if data is being transferred to an unsafe country when

Collectibles Go Digital with DigiCol, Multi-functional Infrastructure for the Next Wave of NFT adoption

DigiCol

DigiCol
DigiCol
DigiCol

VICTORIA, Seychelles, Oct. 11, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The hype in Decentralized Finance (DeFi) quickly dissipated as DeFi-related assets recorded sharp reversals in their price. DeFi users that were overleveraged observed their wealth evaporate as the value of their collateral diminished. As DeFi interest subsides, NFT interest has been piqued.

Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) are distinct token types that derive their utility from being diverse and unique from other tokens. Data is suggesting that we are approaching the next wave of NFT adoption.

NFTs can be considered to be digital collectables which are traded and secured on a blockchain infrastructure. They are commonly tied to non-fungible ERC721 tokens on the Ethereum blockchain. Google data shows record-high search volume for the term “NFT”.

DigiCol will provide the infrastructure for the next wave of NFT adoption. NFT users have previously faced stiff technical barriers to creating and using NFTs. It typically requires advanced coding knowledge and a deep familiarity with third-party wallets like MetaMask.

DigiCol is the first platform to empower users with one-click NFT creation. Moreover, users will be able to trade NFTs in the DigiCol marketplace without the hassles of connecting to a third-party wallet.

The previous NFT hype cycle resulted in some tokens being traded for over $100,000. But as interest resurfaces, NFT users will demand more sophisticated infrastructure and more liquid markets.

NFTs have found huge markets in fields like art collectibles and online gaming. We have already observed decentralized marketplaces emerge to cater to these niches. But none have the one-click creation and seamless trading features of DigiCol.

After DigiCol users create NFTs, they can launch them into a liquid marketplace and earn rewards when their tokens are traded. Users that own NFTs can earn rewards in tokens native to the DigiCol platform by showcasing

IBM Surges As Infrastructure Spin-Off Highlights Cloud Focus

International Business Machines Corp.  (IBM) – Get Report shares jumped higher Thursday after the cloud-focused computer group said it would spin off its infrastructure division.

IBM said it will sell its ‘managed infrastructure services unit’, a legacy division that sits within the group’s global technology services group. The move will help concentrate IBM’s focus on hybrid cloud growth, the company said, which have been driving group earnings under new CEO Arvind Krishna.

IBM said the separation, a tax-free spin-off to IBM shareholders, will likely be completed by the end of next year.

“IBM is laser-focused on the $1 trillion hybrid cloud opportunity. Client buying needs for application and infrastructure services are diverging, while adoption of our hybrid cloud platform is accelerating,” Krishna said. “Now is the right time to create two market-leading companies focused on what they do best. IBM will focus on its open hybrid cloud platform and AI capabilities. NewCo will have greater agility to design, run and modernize the infrastructure of the world’s most important organizations.”

“Both companies will be on an improved growth trajectory with greater ability to partner and capture new opportunities – creating value for clients and shareholders,” he added.

IBM shares were marked 7.5% higher in early trading following news of the division sale to change hands at $133.62 each, the highest since early June.

IBM’s second quarter cloud revenues rose 30% to $6.3 billion. as well as solid sales from its cloud and cognitive software division, following a re-focus of business operations and reporting strucures announced last year.

Free cash flow generation also impressed, growing 15% year-on-year and snapping several quarters of decline under the previous executive team, while margins and cash collections improved.