4 Indian Entrepreneurs Who Embraced Technology In Their Business Models


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Without a doubt, one of the most exciting technological innovations this decade has seen is the evolution of blockchain. Since its inception, it has revolutionized digital commerce, technology and brought about the possibility of near-instant financial transactions. The global economic model is undergoing a huge transformation and being one of the frontrunners in technology, the Indian entrepreneurship industry is adapting blockchain technology. Here are four entrepreneurs from India who are leveraging the power of blockchain.

Sandeep Nailwal, Co-Founder and COO of Matic Networks

Nailwal co-founded Matic Network in 2018 and worked with his team to make it a global leader in blockchain space with a $200 million market cap. Today, Matic Network is one of the fastest growing DApps (decentralized applications) platforms enabling tonnes of applications utilization of blockchains in their business models and creating community-centric businesses.

Coming from a top B-School in India, Nailwal has been involved in multiple ventures ranging from health and fitness, retail e-commerce to productized B2B services. This has given him a breadth of experience which has been instrumental in the success of his efforts. He has been working with various government institutions (especially in India), helping them utilize blockchain technology in a way that creates a more corruption-free, transparent, efficient and inclusive environment for our billion-people strong country. He, along with the Matic Network team, are widely regarded as the ones who have fuelled the Indian blockchain developer ecosystem to its current heights due to continuous efforts in building the blockchain development community in India with hackathons, developer grants, mentorship, investments, etc.

Matic is a leading layer-2 scaling solution for Ethereum. It aims to provide mass adoption ready infrastructure to

J&K police on toes as website calls journalists, activists ‘gang of Indian payrolls’

Srinagar: The Jammu and Kashmir police appears to be on their toes following a social media post from an obscure source mentioning the names of as many as 27 local journalists and other media persons and 12 political and social activists as being on the payroll of the Indian government.

Though the post assumed by some security officials here as a “hit list” or, at least, a “warning list” titled the “whole gang of so-called journalist/media fraternity working under Indian payroll” was deleted later, the J&K police authorities have taken the matter “very seriously” and decided “leave nothing to chance”.

 

Over the past few days, the police have got in touch with almost all Valley-based media persons individually to inquire if they feel threatened and needed security or any assistance from it. The list had categorized fourteen media persons and ten activists as ‘A+’, nine as ‘B’ and four as ‘C’ grade members of the ‘gang’. The remaining two had been left without any ranking.

On Friday, the police also installed CCTV cameras in almost every nook and cranny of Mushtaq Press Enclave, the media hub of Srinagar named after photojournalist Mushtaq Ali who was killed in a parcel bomb explosion in this correspondent’s office in September 1995.

 

It was in this area only where ‘Rising Kashmir’ editor Shuja’at Bukhari was gunned down by unknown assailants –accused by the authorities of being Lashkar-e-Tayyaba cadres- on June 14, 2018. Another journalist Parvaz Sultan was also murdered here in February 2003.

The area, less than 300 yards from City centre Lal Chowk witnessed grenade attacks, kidnappings and some other atrocious incidents involving various parties to the conflict since 1990 when the Kashmiri separatist campaign burst into a major violence.  

 

The police officials said that the purpose of installing CCTV cameras in

Facebook’s alleged indifference of Indian hate speech linked to policy chief’s political bias

Over the past several weeks, there has been an increasing clamour for Facebook to place its India public policy head, Ankhi Das, on leave as the company continues with an audit of its India operations.

The impetus for the audit was an article written by the Wall Street Journal in mid-August. In that piece, WSJ reported that Das had resisted against taking down inflammatory content that eventually sparked rioting in the capital city of Delhi as it was posted by members of the nationalist BJP party. 

The riots left over fifty dead, most of whom were Muslims. It also led to many of these Muslims’ homes being torched.

“The company’s top public-policy executive in the country, Ankhi Das, opposed applying the hate-speech rules to [T Raja] Singh and at least three other Hindu nationalist individuals and groups flagged internally for promoting or participating in violence,” WSJ reported.

These inflammatory posts were reportedly only taken down months after the riots had already occured, and only when the paper approached the company for a statement. 

One of the BJP politicians, Raja Singh, reportedly said that Rohingya Muslim refugees should be “shot”, and had labelled Indian Muslims as traitors while also threatening to destroy their mosques. Singh, who has enshrined a reputation for these kinds of comments, has since denied these allegations and claimed his account was hacked.

The audit was initiated when a group of 54 retired civil servants wrote to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg about the WSJ revelation. This call for an audit was then reiterated by a jointly-written letter to Facebook by global civil rights organisations such as the Southern Law Poverty Center, Muslim Advocates, and other organisations in countries such as the UK, US, and New Zealand.

“The audit must be removed entirely from the influence of the India

Google defers Indian in-app commission fees after startups complain

BENGALURU (Reuters) – Alphabet Inc’s Google has extended its deadline for Indian app developers to comply with a new billing system by six months to March 31, 2022, the U.S. tech giant said in a blog post on Monday.

Google also said https://india.googleblog.com/2020/10/google-plays-billing-system-update.html it was setting up “listening sessions” with leading startups to understand their concerns and establishing “policy workshops” to clear any additional questions after it said it will more strictly enforce a global policy and charge a 30% commission fee for in-app purchases, irking some developers.

In recent days, many startups in India have banded together to consider ways to challenge Google, including by lodging complaints with the government and courts. They are upset about the 30% commission fee and say several other Google Play Store policies hurt their businesses.

Google said the policy is not new and more than 97% of developers with apps on its app store already comply with the policy.

“To be clear, the policy only applies if a developer charges users to download their app or they sell in-app digital items,” it said.

Globally, app developers have said 30% is excessive compared with the 2% fees of typical credit card payments processors. Google and rival Apple, which charges a similar fee, have said the amount covers the security and marketing benefits their app stores provide.

(Reporting by Nivedita Bhattacharjee and Chandini Monnappa in Bengaluru; Editing by Rashmi Aich and Christopher Cushing)

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Dubai-based Indian Student Uses stay-at-home Time to Write Book on Computer Programming

Dubai: A Dubai-based Indian student used his stay-at-home time due to the Covid-19 pandemic to write a book on computer programming, a media report said.

The Khaleej Times report published on Saturday said that the 12-year-old Amritesh Banerjee, the class 8 student of Cambridge International School, Dubai, is not only a published writer, but is also coaching students virtually.

“It took me four months to complete this book. The paperback version was launched in September. The online version will be launched on October 15, which is the World Students’ Day,” said Amritesh.

“My father got 5,000 likes on his LinkedIn profile after he posted my book. That’s when people started approaching him, saying their children, who are my age, needed guidance on the subject.

“So I’ve held a few online classes as peer-to-peer learning can prove to be immensely helpful in understanding concepts. My father has always reiterated … that learning is about sharing,” the Khaleej Times report quoted the student as saying.

Amritesh, who loves all things mathematics, has already learnt multiple computer programming languages, developed video games and also customised an AI chatbot.

“My Grade 7 IT teacher in the school really inspired me to take up this project. My father further guided me. Gradually, I started getting interested in it and got so absorbed that I could not stop. I ended up writing 5,000 words, which turned into a book.

“So, this book provides all the real-world solutions to those who are venturing into the world of Python programming. Therefore, this book is for beginners. Soon, I intend to undertake a project for advanced levels, too,” he said.

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