Hyundai begins building electric vehicle hub in Singapore

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – South Korea’s Hyundai Motor Co started construction on a research and development centre in Singapore on Tuesday that will house a small-scale electric vehicle production facility.

Speaking at the groundbreaking ceremony, Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said the facility may produce up to 30,000 electric vehicles (EVs) annually by 2025 and represents an investment of S$400 million ($295 million).

Singapore is one of the world’s most expensive places to buy a car and does not currently have any auto manufacturing capacity. But the wealthy city-state has set out ambitious plans to phase out petrol vehicles by 2040.

“Automotive activities are becoming viable in Singapore once again. EVs have a different supply chain, fewer mechanical parts and more electronics, which plays to Singapore’s strengths,” PM Lee said.

A Hyundai spokeswoman confirmed the 30,000 unit target but said that the exact capacity was yet to be determined. The facility is due for completion by end 2022, the firm said in a statement.

The announcement comes after vacuum cleaner company Dyson last year scrapped plans to build an electric car in Singapore, saying it was not commercially viable.

Singapore plans to phase out petrol and diesel vehicles by 2040, and make a bigger bet on electrification to cut greenhouse gases and slow climate change.

Hyundai said in a statement its new Singapore facility aims to be carbon neutral by using solar and hydrogen energy, will utilise technologies such as artificial intelligence and robotics, and will include a test drive track for customers.

The centre is part of Hyundai’s vision to enable future vehicle buyers to customize and purchase vehicles online using a smartphone, allowing production to be on-demand.

($1 = 1.3590 Singapore dollars)

(Reporting by John Geddie and Aradhana Aravindan in Singapore; Editing by Ana Nicolaci da Costa)

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France’s Health Data Hub to move to European cloud infrastructure to avoid EU-US data transfers

France’s data regulator CNIL has issued some recommendations for French services that handle health data, as Mediapart first reported. Those services should avoid using American cloud hosting companies altogether, such as Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud.

Those recommandations follow a landmark ruling by Europe’s top court in July. The ruling, dubbed Schrems II, struck down the EU-US Data Privacy Shield. Under the Privacy Shield, companies could outsource data processing from the EU to the US in bulk. Due to concerns over US surveillance laws, that mechanism is no longer allowed.

The CNIL is going one step further by saying that services and companies that handle health data should also avoid doing business with American companies — it’s not just about processing European data in Europe. Once again, this is all about avoiding falling under U.S. regulation and rulings.

The regulator sent those recommendations to one of France’s top courts (Conseil d’État). SantéNathon, a group of organizations and unions, originally notified the CNIL over concerns about France’s Health Data Hub.

France is currently building a platform to store health data at the national level. The idea is to build a hub that makes it easier to study rare diseases and use artificial intelligence to improve diagnoses. It is supposed to aggregate data from different sources and make it possible to share some data with public and private institutions for those specific cases.

The technical choices have been controversial as the French government originally chose to partner with Microsoft and its cloud platform Microsoft Azure.

Microsoft, like many other companies, relies on Standard Contractual Clauses for EU-US data transfers. But the Court of Justice of the EU has made it clear that EU regulators have to intervene if data is being transferred to an unsafe country when

Aqara Camera Hub G2H with HomeKit Secure Video arrives in US

The Aqara Camera Hub G2H is a HomeKit Secure Video camera for indoor use that doubles as an Aqara home hub.

Aqara makes a range of HomeKit devices that include home surveillance tools, lighting, and comfort controls. The Aqara Camera Hub G2H functions as a hub for all your Aqara devices as well as a HomeKit Secure Video camera.

HomeKit Secure Video ensures that a security camera captures footage safely and securely and stores it fully encrypted in iCloud. Footage from your home security cameras will be analyzed by your HomeKit Hub using local device intelligence to determine if people, pets, or cars are visible. Recorded video is stored for ten days without penalty to your iCloud storage.

Users with 200GB iCloud storage plans can record and store one camera’s video for up to 10 days. Those with 2TB plans can record up to five cameras. There is no limit to how many cameras are streaming with HSV, just a limit to recording.

The Aqara Camera Hub G2H has local storage available for recording via an SD card, and can also be configured to save recordings within the Aqara app.

Since this is also an Aqara Hub, users will be able to use it to connect all of their other Aqara products to HomeKit for advanced automation features.

The camera is 1080p, which is all that is supported by HSV, and has a 140 degree field of vision. It also supports night vision and has a microphone that can pick up sound clearly up to 5 meters away.

The Aqara Camera Hub G2H with HomeKit Secure Video is available on Amazon for $69.99.

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South China’s Monumental Tech R&D Hub Hit by Storms over Trade, Hong Kong

At a new 400-acre research-and-development center on China’s south coast, Huawei Technologies Co. engineers chat, tap at their phones, or chill out on a small electric tram that whirs them between buildings modeled variously on the Sorbonne or England’s great universities. They move through neighborhoods built in the style of Versailles or Renaissance Italy, passing by some of the 3,000 gardening and maintenance staff needed to keep the vast parklands immaculate.

It’s late July, and on this Disneyland-like corporate campus about an hour and a half’s drive from Hong Kong, Huawei seems to be basking in the wealth from its leadership in 5G mobile technology. No other company has done more to project the image of a technologically advanced China on the international stage. And no other company stands as a greater symbol of China’s engagement with the outside world.

Huawei’s vaulting ambition to be at the forefront of future-defining technologies has landed the company in the crosshairs of the U.S. and other governments that see it as a conduit for the geopolitical objectives of the Chinese Communist Party. In mid-August the U.S. Department of Commerce, at President Trump’s direction, handed down yet another round of restrictions aimed at cutting Huawei’s access to commercially available computing chips it needs to make 5G base stations and smartphones.

The fortunes of China’s largest technology company by revenue are entwined with a vast project that’s now the front line of the hugely consequential tech war between the U.S. and China: the Greater Bay Area, a region tasked by President Xi Jinping with pushing the nation toward global technology leadership.

The GBA’s ability to innovate and integrate enough to succeed in that task is facing its stiffest challenge yet from a U.S.-led global backlash against Chinese tech and Beijing’s political crackdown in Hong Kong.