Could Global Hiring Be The Future?

CEO at Terminal, a startup changing the way high-growth tech companies hire and retain tech talent.

In the past, when companies needed to hire new employees to fill important jobs, it usually required the physical relocation of talent. Immigration was always considered a way for growing companies to bring new labor or talent into a country, but it also required a lot of paperwork and process.

President George H.W. Bush signed the Immigration Act of 1990 to create the H-1B program to help American companies overcome labor shortages in growing fields that demanded specialized skills, such as research, engineering and computer programming. In nearly three decades of existence, the best and brightest around the world have contributed to American companies with significant impact; however, due to increased barriers and employee freedom, only 2 of every 100 jobs are filled by the H-1B program.

Our recent mass migration to remote work has triggered a change in the dynamics between talent and employers — talent today has learned that they no longer have to move across country and state borders to land roles at leading companies. According to my company’s recent engineer survey, 40% of engineers in Canada and Mexico say they don’t want to come to the U.S. What’s more, data from LinkedIn on city migration patterns amid the pandemic found that in America’s major metropolitan cities like New York and San Francisco, departures have significantly exceeded new arrivals and have fallen more than 20% from April through August of this year versus a year earlier. 

From the ashes of closed physical borders and in-home lockdowns, we’re now seeing the phoenix of digital immigration — the natural progression of digital transformation, the idea that modern companies and workers are connecting across borders through digital technologies, increasing

Tech Dominates FlexJob’s Top 50 Companies Hiring For Remote Jobs

  • 24 of the top 50 companies who posted the most remote job openings on FlexJobs between March 1 and September 15, 2020, are software and technology-based.
  • Atlassian, Amazon, Collabera, CrowdStrike, Oracle, Red Hat, Tanium and Twilio are a few of the many tech companies actively looking to fill remote-based job positions today.  
  • Amazon has 949 open work-from-home positions open today on their Amazon Jobs site, 287 of which are for Solution Architect roles, 99 in Software Development and 83 in Project/Program/Product Management Non-Tech.   

FlexJobs is one of the leading sites and subscription services specializing in verified high quality, remote and flexible jobs. They have seen an increase of more than 50% in remote job listings in the areas of Computer/IT, Customer Service, Accounting & Finance, Project Management, Marketing and Sales this year. Tech companies’ need for remote workers is the most pervasive, with 24 of the 50 actively looking to fill open positions. Healthcare is the next-highest industry, with seven of the 50 companies looking to bring remote-based hires onboard.  

The recruitment site is also seeing an increase in the number of new companies recruiting remote workers. The site reports they’ve seen a 10% increase in Q2 over Q1 and a 53% increase in new companies in Q3 over Q2. They recently completed an analysis of the top 50 companies who have posted the most remote job openings between March 1 and September 15, 2020. You can find the analysis here: Top 50 Companies Hiring for Remote Jobs During the Pandemic.

The following are the tech companies who have posted the most remote job openings on the FlexJobs site this year:

  • Atlassian – Currently has 124 open remote

3 Fatal Mistakes Brands Make When Hiring SEO Copywriters

Search marketing is a popular inbound marketing strategy.

Search influences a purchase enormously.

Up to 72% of buyers start research for a product or service by consulting Google.

Smart SEO marketing guarantees you a steady, ever-increasing flow of traffic, leads, and sales. But to nail it and reap all these benefits you need excellent SEO copywriters. Sadly, most brands trip up when hiring writers. Consequently, they don’t see results.

In this post, I will reveal three common mistakes companies make when hiring an SEO copywriter. Better yet, the post will suggest fixes for the missteps.

Mistake #1: Asking for academic degrees

A significant number of companies require degrees like BA In Communication Science or Creative Writing for writers to join their staff.

But that’s a massive blunder.

First, there are very few universities that teach SEO copywriting. Most college classes teach dry, formal, offline media stuff that doesn’t work online. Second, not all gifted writers have writing degrees.

So if you insist on a degree, you miss out on many talented result-getting writers who don’t have a formal qualification. After all, SEO writing isn’t about fancy degrees, it’s about getting results in the actual world.

What you should do instead:

  • Ask for case studies of results the writer has achieved in the past.
  • Find out what if the prospect has undergone any Search Engine Optimization training, whether free or paid.
  • Ask how much the prospect has invested in SEO skills development. Serious contenders spend money on career growth because they always want to get better. Pretenders don’t want to part with a penny to sharpen their skills.
  • Commit to writer training and development to improve the skill levels of your writing team. Train them after you get them.

Mistake #2: Going for the cheapest writer

A significant number of business

U.S. government scrutinizes Microsoft’s hiring practices as tech giant looks to boost diversity

Microsoft’s headquarters in Redmond, Wash. (GeekWire Photo / Monica Nickelsburg)

Microsoft in June announced a sweeping racial justice plan, including an initiative to spend $150 million on diversity and inclusion programs, and double its number of Black and African American managers and senior employees by 2025 in the U.S.

Now the United States Department of Labor Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) is taking a closer look at the company’s hiring and whether it constitutes unlawful discrimination on the basis of race.

“We have every confidence that Microsoft’s diversity initiative complies fully with all U.S. employment laws,” Dev Stahlkopf, corporate vice president and general counsel at Microsoft, wrote in a blog post published Tuesday. “We look forward to providing the OFCCP with this information and, if necessary, defending our approach.”

The OFCCP asks Microsoft to “prove that the actions we are taking to improve opportunities are not illegal race-based decisions,” according to the company’s blog post.

We’ve reached out to the OFCCP to learn more about its inquiry and whether other tech companies were contacted. Google, Facebook, and others have made similar commitments in recent months.

The probe comes as President Trump aims to stop federal agencies from conducting anti-racism training. Trump signed an executive order last month on “combating race and sex stereotyping” in the federal workforce. Last week the Trump administration told federal agencies to suspend diversity training programs until they meet the guidelines laid out in the executive order.

Here’s more from Microsoft’s blog post:

“We are clear that the law prohibits us from discriminating on the basis of race. We also have affirmative obligations as a company that serves the federal government to continue to increase the diversity of our workforce, and we take those obligations very seriously. We have decades of experience and know