Saints coach Sean Payton continues to use gadget QB Taysom Hill, and it continues to not work

If you weren’t watching football on Monday night but checked social media, you might have thought Taysom Hill and Sean Payton robbed a bank or something.

It’s really not Hill’s fault that Payton keeps using him long after the effectiveness of bringing him in as a Wildcat quarterback has worn off. But here’s what happens: The New Orleans Saints take the great Drew Brees off the field in a key spot, everyone knows Hill will run it, and they stop it. It has been a bust all season.

It happened again on Monday night. Hill came in at quarterback on a third-and-3, he ran it straight ahead and got stopped easily by the Los Angeles Chargers defense. The Saints then settled for a field goal.

And Twitter was angry, my friends.

Oh, wait. T.J. Lang’s post was from a week ago. This is an ongoing problem for the Saints and Payton.

Hill has had his moments. He’s a great athlete and good gadget player. He had a huge game in a wild-card playoff loss to the Minnesota Vikings last season. New Orleans gave him a two-year, $21 million deal this past offseason, which speaks to how the Saints overvalue him.

Hill’s usage was once a fun wrinkle, but now has become predictable and stale as Payton overused it.

And it doesn’t seem like Payton is going to stop doing it.

New Orleans Saints quarterback Taysom Hill (7) continues to get the call from Sean Payton on big downs. (AP Photo/Brett Duke)
New Orleans Saints quarterback Taysom Hill (7) continues to get the call from Sean Payton on big downs. (AP Photo/Brett Duke)

More

How Big Tech became such a big target on Capitol Hill

  • The five U.S. tech giants are now valued at about $7 trillion, up from $2 trillion five years ago.
  • As lawmakers made clear in a report released this week, they view Big Tech as having dangerous monopolistic power that needs to be checked.
  • A number of things have taken place in the past decade that turned the Silicon Valley-Seattle corridor into a target for Washington politicians.



Mark Zuckerberg wearing a suit and tie: Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg walks past members of the news media as he enters the office of U.S. Senator Josh Hawley (R-MO) while meeting with lawmakers to discuss


© Provided by CNBC
Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg walks past members of the news media as he enters the office of U.S. Senator Josh Hawley (R-MO) while meeting with lawmakers to discuss

After a 16-month investigation into competitive practices at the largest U.S. tech companies, Democratic congressional staffers laid out their findings this week in a 449-page report. They concluded that Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google enjoy monopoly power that needs to be reined in, whether that means breaking the companies up, blocking future acquisitions or forcing them to open their platforms.

Loading...

Load Error

Wall Street shrugged at the news. Three of the four stocks rose the day after the report’s release, reflecting investors’ long-held view that regulators and politicians are in no position to squelch Big Tech’s continuing rise and market share expansion.

Still, lawmakers certainly aren’t putting the matter to rest. And with Joe Biden carrying a commanding lead in the polls less than a month before the Nov. 3 election, tech companies face the possibility of Democrats controlling the White House and both branches of Congress in 2021.

Should Democrats win the Senate, it would put Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, who are among the loudest voices calling for the break up of Big Tech, in the majority.

Here’s what Warren had to say in early 2019:

“Today’s big tech companies have too much power — too much power