9 ways to expand computer science equity in high school

Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught

(GettyImages/Hill Street Studios)(GettyImages/Hill Street Studios)

Almost half of U.S. high schools now teach at least one computer science course. That means, however, students at a majority of high schools don’t have access to computer science, according to a new report.

And Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught, according to “State of Computer Science Education: Illuminating Disparities” by Code.org, the Computer Science Teachers Association, and the Expanding Computing Education Pathways Alliance.

Students from rural areas and economically disadvantaged backgrounds are also less likely to have a chance to take computer science.

Students in these underrepresented groups are also less likely than are white and Asian American teeens to attend a school that offers an advanced placement computer science course or to an AP test in the subject.


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And even though female students remain underrepresented in high school computer science courses, the number of students taking AP computer science exams has been growing rapidly, the report found.

Disparities would be better illuminated if schools measured disparities by determining computer science participation by students’ specific race, ethnicity and economic status, rather than by the general term “underrepresented minorities,” the report found.

The report also recommended nine policies states and districts can implement to provide equitable access to computer science:

  • Create a state plan for K–12 computer science
  • Define computer science and establish rigorous K–12 computer science standards
  • Allocate funding for rigorous computer science teacher professional learning and course support
  • Implement clear certification pathways for computer science teachers
  • Create programs at institutions of higher education to offer computer science to

ARK Next Generation Internet ETF (ARKW) Hits a 52-Week High

For investors seeking momentum, ARK Next Generation Internet ETF ARKW is probably a suitable pick. The fund just hit a 52-week high and is up 191.3% from its 52-week low price of $40.50/share.

Let’s take a look at the fund and its near-term outlook to gain an insight into where it might be headed:

ARKW in Focus

Companies within the fund are focused on and expected to benefit from shifting the bases of technology infrastructure to the cloud, enabling mobile, new and local services, such as companies that rely on or benefit from the increased use of shared technology, infrastructure and services, Internet-based products and services, new payment methods, big data, the Internet of things, and social distribution and media. It has AUM of $2.43 billion and charges an expense ratio of 76 basis points.

Why the Move?

Due to the coronavirus outbreak, consumers are opting for online retailers to purchase food items and other goods and are resorting to video streaming services and other modes of in-house entertainment. In line with the rising online shopping trend, customers are resorting to digital payments to clear their bills, while merchants and utility providers are advocating the same. Also, the pandemic has resulted in some changes in the lifestyle and preference of people. Most of the surveys have found that people are opting for online shopping over visiting a brick-and-mortar store for their purchases of essential food items and supplies. This is making funds like ARKW an attractive investment option.

More Gains Ahead?

It seems like the fund will remain strong, with a positive weighted alpha of 160.14  which gives cues of further rally.

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It’s High Time We Got a ‘F**k Off’ Economy: Zephyr Teachout

In the 1980s, under the Reagan administration’s lax enforcement of antitrust laws, corporate mergers in the U.S. began to jump. Since then, the market power of America’s biggest corporations has only continued to increase, with this result: A tiny number of companies dominate slews of major industries—from pharmaceuticals and retailers to hospitals and meat processors to defense contractors and social media, to many, many others. This issue was thrown into stark relief during the pandemic when behemoths such as Amazon, Google, Facebook, and Walmart saw their market values skyrocket while smaller companies all over the country went bankrupt.

Zephyr Teachout contends that monopoly is the forgotten issue of our time.

Monopoly, argues the law professor and former New York congressional and gubernatorial candidate, is a key driver of modern society’s biggest problems, such as low wages, income inequality, financial speculation, restrictions to worker freedom, declining entrepreneurship, and racism.

With her new book, Break Em’ Up: Recovering Our Freedom from Big Ag, Big Tech, and Big Money, Teachout seeks to make anti-monopoly a top issue for progressives again. I recently spoke to her by phone about how the Left has missed the monopoly problem, why her book is more about power than economics, and why we need to strive for a “fuck off” economy.

In your introduction, you write that humans have a drive for power that must be checked or tyranny will result. Why did you start like this?

So many questions about politics, power and the economy are really questions about human nature. When we treat Jeff Bezos or Mark Zuckerberg as only about the bottom line, we’re misunderstanding motivations. It’s much more than greed. As I write in the book, these are “William the Conqueror” types. They’re out to accumulate power. We need to confront that if

Tesla Model 3 Price Too High? Dirt-Cheap Used Electric Cars Can Be Good Deals

The used EV has arrived.

It was only nine years ago that the first won’t-break-the-bank electric cars arrived.

Those non-Tesla EVs — like the Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt — weren’t priced at $80,000 like the Model S and the first- and second- generations of those cars have been hitting the used car market over the last several years.

And with a Long Range 2020 Tesla Model 3 starting at about $47,000, “dirt cheap” for an EV is anything under $20,000.

A couple of the better sites for used EVs are MYEV and CarGurus.

Most of the used EVs cited below are first- and second-generation electrics that were sold roughly between 2011 and 2017.

Note: all prices are based on a used vehicle with under 40,000 miles. Price ranges are typical but some listings may be lower or higher:

Table notes:

*Used Nissan Leaf EPA-rated battery range depends on year and model: typically, the older (pre-2018), cheaper Leaf models have 107 miles of range while the newer have 150 miles. The oldest Leaf models have a range from approximately 70 to 84 miles. I am not including the oldest 70-75 mile range models, which typically start at about $5,000.

*Used Volkswagen e-Golf EPA-rated battery range depends on year and model: typically, the older (pre-2018), cheaper e-Golf models have 83 miles of range while the newer have 125 miles.

**Chevy Volt is an EV but is also referred to as a plug-in hybrid because it has a range-extending gas-engine generator that boosts the total range to 420 miles

Low tech talk in Google, Oracle high tech copyright clash

WASHINGTON (AP) — The topic was high tech: the code behind smartphones.

But on Wednesday the Supreme Court looked to more low tech examples, from the typewriter keyboard to restaurant menus, try to resolve an $8 billion-plus copyright dispute between tech giants Google and Oracle.

The case, which the justices heard by phone because of the coronavirus pandemic, has to do with Google’s creation of the Android operating system now used on the vast majority of smartphones worldwide. In developing Android, Google used some of Oracle’s computer code.

Some justices seemed concerned that a ruling for Oracle could stifle innovation.



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Chief Justice John Roberts was among the justices who turned to examples beyond technology to try to get a handle on the dispute, asking Oracle’s lawyer to imagine opening a new restaurant and creating a menu.

“Of course you’re going to have, you know, appetizers first, then entrees and then desserts. Now you shouldn’t have to worry about whether that organization is copyrighted,” Roberts said, suggesting Oracle’s argument went to far.

But Roberts also had strong words for Google’s lawyer. “Cracking the safe may be the only way to get the money that you want, but that doesn’t mean you can do it,” Roberts said, suggesting Google could have licensed what it wanted to use.

To create Android, which was released in 2007, Google wrote millions of lines of new computer code. But it also used 11,330 lines of code and an organization that’s part of Oracle’s Java platform.

Google says what it did is long-settled, common practice in the industry, a practice that has been good for technical progress. And it says there is no copyright protection for the