Software Engineering Is Shaping The Jobs Of Tomorrow, Here’s How

This article is sponsored by Billy Blue College of Design at Torrens University Australia.

Software engineering is an ever expanding frontier, full of constant innovation. Over the past decade, the industry’s growth has been skyrocketing globally. In Australia, the industry has grown by an annualised 11.4% since 2015.

Think about it – when was the last time you went an entire day without using some form of software? From listening to your favourite music on Spotify, to playing a round of Overwatch and tapping your debit card to pay for your morning coffee, these everyday tasks wouldn’t be possible without someone creating the software that makes them run.

In an article discussing the future of software engineering, Maryville University noted that, “As businesses of all kinds rely more heavily on computer-driven processes, it’s up to software engineers to design, maintain, and innovate these infrastructures.”

“Software engineer” as a role is a bit of a vague term. What type of software are you engineering, exactly? As more and more industries are implementing innovations in computer, so too are the available options. According to TeachBeacon, the sectors where these innovations could be most implemented include retail, health care, research and development, business, Silicon Valley high-tech, government, and defence.

Due to this variety of sectors, there are plenty of options for applying software skills. If you love videogames, you can become a game programmer; if you have an interest in digital media, you can apply your skills to the field of UX and web design – or if you love tech but don’t want to program, take the lead and consider a role in digital transformation.

One of the hottest fields of software engineering is the increased development of artificial intelligence. While the automation of jobs may cause the displacement of human-workers

Here’s How a Justice Amy Coney Barrett Could Affect Entrepreneurs


9 min read


This week, Supreme Court confirmation hearings got underway for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s controversial, last-minute pick to fill Justice Ruth Ginsburg’s seat. Barrett’s pro-life stance and potential willingness to overturn Roe v. Wade has been the main topic of discussion. But where does she stand when it comes to business interests — for big and small companies — and protections for employees? Or contract workers? 

A recent study found that one-third of Americans now work in the $1.2 trillion freelance economy — a figure that’s ballooned 22 percent since 2019. On November 10, the Supreme Court will hear arguments on the fate of the Affordable Care Act, which provides health insurance to millions of Americans who don’t get it through their employers, as well as small-business owners (with under 50 employees) who use the public marketplace to provide insurance to their employees. According to the Commonwealth Fund, “More than 5.7 million small-business employees or self-employed workers are enrolled in the ACA marketplaces; more than half of all ACA marketplace enrollees are small-business owners, self-employed individuals, or small-business employees.” In 2017 Barrett wrote that she disagreed with Chief Justice John Roberts’ decision to uphold the ACA, and if she’s confirmed before the election it’s likely she’ll have a say in the case.

It’s widely understood that the current Supreme Court is “pro-business.” But this traditionally translates to pro-corporate business, and according to an analysis done by Rocket Lawyer, Barrett is set to become the court’s most “pro-business” justice. The analysis looked at Supreme Court opinions from 2018 to now, “in cases where business interests are in conflict with consumer, employee, or other non-corporate interests.” Then, Rocket Lawyer looked at Barrett’s opinions on the Seventh Court of Appeals during the same period and found

Here’s Doom running on a Samsung fridge thanks to xCloud

I’m fairly sure cars were supposed to be flying by now, but instead we’ve managed something else that would have felt like science fiction a decade ago: playing Xbox games on your fridge. That’s right, someone has managed to get Microsoft’s xCloud service running on a Samsung smart fridge.

Instagram user Richard Mallard has managed this feat of modern engineering, sideloading the Android version of the Xbox Game Pass app onto his fridge. The app runs in portrait mode on Samsung’s smart fridge, but games appear at the correct aspect ratio alongside cheese, beers, and whatever other essentials you store in a fridge.

Keeping with the tradition of running Doom games on unusual hardware, Mallard picked Doom Eternal, a modern installment in the series. We’ve even seen Doom running inside Minecraft recently. Doom Eternal is also the first first game to arrive on Xbox Game Pass following Microsoft’s acquisition of ZeniMax.

While xCloud running on a smart fridge is certainly amusing, it also means Microsoft’s game streaming service is available on a fridge before it’s launched on an iPad or iPhone. Apple has been blocking services like xCloud and Stadia from iOS and iPadOS, but the company did offer an olive branch recently which would mean Microsoft and others would be able to package cloud games into separate apps on the App Store.

It’s a ridiculous restriction that doesn’t exist on Android, allowing xCloud to run across a variety of handsets, tablets, and now smart fridges. Microsoft wasn’t impressed with Apple’s recent cloud gaming policy changes, and the company is now pressing ahead with a web version to bypass Apple’s restrictions. During a recent all-hands meeting at Microsoft, Xbox chief Phil Spencer revealed a “direct browser-based solution” for xCloud will be available in early 2021. He didn’t mention smart

Here’s why Amazon pulled the plug on its first big budget video game ‘Crucible’ shortly after launch

(Crucible Image)

Amazon Game Studios and Relentless Studios’ online third-person shooter Crucible will be taken offline. An entry labeled as a “final update” on its official development blog went up late on Friday afternoon to inform fans and beta testers that work on the game would be discontinued.

Crucible had been in development since 2014 when it launched on May 20, and was initially heralded as Amazon’s big attempt to break into the video game market. It was initially free to play and download, with a number of in-game purchases that offered new character costumes, additional currency, and other extras.

However, Crucible quickly ran into a host of problems, including server issues, lukewarm reviews, and criticism over its “freemium” pricing model. A little over a month later, on June 30, Amazon yanked Crucible from digital storefronts and returned it to a closed beta.

Since then, Crucible‘s primary developers at Seattle-based Relentless Studios have made steady incremental updates to the game, tracking each one on a public-facing Trello as a roadmap. They’d completed almost all of the features that they planned to add, with updates going live as recently as this week, but after evaluating player feedback and internal data, decided to pull the plug.

“We very much appreciate the way that our fans have rallied around our efforts, and we’ve loved seeing your responses to the changes we’ve made over the last few months, but ultimately we didn’t see a healthy, sustainable future ahead of Crucible,” the team wrote in its blog post. “We’ll be transitioning our team to focus on New World and other upcoming projects from Amazon Games.”

Crucible.

Crucible is what game enthusiasts often call a “hero shooter,” where players pick from a cast of characters with unique abilities and equipment to compete with one

Here’s where overseas and military voters can return ballots online

  • While reliable online voting will likely never be a reality for all voters, most states permit voters in the military and those who live overseas to vote remotely.  
  • In 2020, 32 states will allow some or all overseas and military voters to return their ballots digitally via fax, email, and in a few states, with an online portal. 
  • Electronic transmission can give military voters serving in remote areas with spotty mail delivery a better chance of having their votes counted, but also raises numerous security concerns. 
  • One expert told Business Insider that online ballot transmission leaves voters with little option to verify that their choices were counted accurately and also increases the risk of malware attacks on elections officials. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Reliable online voting for everyone will, in all likelihood, never be a reality, experts say. But in 2020, many states give military and overseas voters the option to transmit their absentee ballots online. 

Members of the Armed Services and their families, diplomats, and private United States citizens living abroad all have the right to vote absentee in federal elections under the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA), a law first passed in the 1980s and further expanded with the MOVE Act, which was passed by Congress in 2009.

Voters covered under UOCAVA have the option to request a ballot for every election in a given year, have that ballot mailed to them no later than 45 days before the election, return it without needing to pay postage, and also have access to a Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot that they can fill out if they don’t receive the requested ballot in time.

And while all voters are required to mail their ballots by Election Day, most states also give overseas and military voters