Computer Science Major Credits MCC for Helping to Find Path

At Middlesex Community College, Sam Holmes is preparing for his future. His three favorite parts about his experience at Middlesex so far have been networking with his classmates, tapping into the resources the college offers, and pursuing his passion. MCC is setting him up for success.

A Computer Science major expecting to graduate in January 2022, Holmes is from Billerica and chose MCC because it is affordable and close to home. After graduating from Middlesex, he plans to transfer to a four-year school to become a Computer Systems Engineer.

Courses such as his Introduction to Programming course with MCC Professor Sanaz Rahimi and Trigonometry for Engineering and Science with Lengchivon Kou have helped him understand how much he enjoys his major and future career.

Holmes is grateful for all of the hard work and dedication he has received from his other professors, including Linda Miller, Lance Solimini, Mike Williamson, Gordon Curry, Aliza Miller and Sylvia Yeung.

As the pandemic caused Middlesex to transition most courses and student services to online formats since the Spring 2020 semester, Holmes has been adjusting to online learning. A self-described “computer geek,” he finds MCC’s online classes to be user friendly.

“My experience with online courses has been going pretty smoothly,” he said. “The ability to plan out my courses using the syllabus and course schedule and knowing when my assignments and projects are all due really help me with planning all of this out.”

Holmes is also taking a few of MCC’s Mini-mester courses, which allows him to complete the same high-quality content, number of credits and instructional hours as a 15-week course in just eight weeks. While there is a lot of work to balance, Holmes has figured out how to best manage his schedule and believes the accelerated classes are useful.

He

Verizon, NMSU work together helping Columbus students access internet

LAS CRUCES – As online education becomes the new normal, many low-income families are struggling to find resources to allow their children to fully participate in classes. Nearly one-quarter of New Mexico’s students lack equipment and internet access at home.



a person standing in front of a brick building: Rosario Pando, assistant librarian of the Columbus Village Library sits at a computer in the library. Thanks to a $50,000 grant, New Mexico State University's computer science department is working with the Columbus Village Library to provide needed access to computers and internet access to students in Columbus, New Mexico.


© Courtesy photo / New Mexico State University
Rosario Pando, assistant librarian of the Columbus Village Library sits at a computer in the library. Thanks to a $50,000 grant, New Mexico State University’s computer science department is working with the Columbus Village Library to provide needed access to computers and internet access to students in Columbus, New Mexico.

As part of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship COVID-19 Funding and Support program in collaboration with New Mexico State University’s computer science department, a one-year, $50,000 grant will provide both access to computers and critical online access to students in Columbus, New Mexico.

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“Less than half of our homes have internet access, primarily because it’s unaffordable for our lower-income citizens,” said Maria Constantine, the director of the Columbus Village Library. “This puts families at a disadvantage for educational and employment opportunities. This program will help level the playing field for kids and families to access the resources they need to improve their lives.”

For NMSU news you can use, subscribe to the Las Cruces Sun-News today.

With the grant funding, in collaboration with Constantine at the Columbus Village Library, 30 laptop computers will be purchased to loan out to students through a check out process along with Wi-Fi range extenders outside of the library, which allow students to access the internet from the parking lot.

“During our initial process, we learned that at least 50 people were accessing the internet from their vehicles,” said Adan Delval, director of the Verizon Innovation Learning Program. “During this pandemic, we

App Removed After Helping Users Bypass China’s Great Firewall

(Bloomberg) — An app backed by Chinese cybersecurity giant 360 Security Technology Inc. that helped users vault over Beijing’s Great Firewall was blocked and removed from mobile stores Saturday.



a close up of a light: Green lights illuminate cable terminals on the Sberbank and SberCloud Christofari supercomputer during an event to mark its launch into commercial operation inside the Sberbank PJSC data processing center (DPC) at the Skolkovo Innovation Center in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, Dec. 16, 2019. As Sberbank expands its technology offerings, the Kremlin is backing legislation aimed at keeping the country's largest internet companies under local control by limiting foreign ownership.


© Bloomberg
Green lights illuminate cable terminals on the Sberbank and SberCloud Christofari supercomputer during an event to mark its launch into commercial operation inside the Sberbank PJSC data processing center (DPC) at the Skolkovo Innovation Center in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, Dec. 16, 2019. As Sberbank expands its technology offerings, the Kremlin is backing legislation aimed at keeping the country’s largest internet companies under local control by limiting foreign ownership.

The Tuber browser, which let mainland users visit blocked sites from Google to Facebook Inc., stopped functioning Saturday afternoon and could no longer be located on the app store run by Huawei Technologies Co. It was unclear which agency ordered its removal, which came after Chinese users on social media hailed their newfound ability to peruse content from Youtube videos to Instagram photos without an illegal virtual private network, or VPN.

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Tuber’s removal may have ended what many Chinese users saw as a state-sanctioned window to the wider internet arena. Beijing maintains rigid control over its internet sphere, requiring companies from Tencent Holdings Ltd. to TikTok-owner ByteDance Ltd. to censor and scrub content critical of the government or its policies.

Tuber initially appeared to provide the nation’s 904 million online users the ability to legally visit overseas websites and browse foreign social media, much of which is barred. It required mobile number registration, giving developers the ability to track activity because all smartphone numbers in the country are linked to unique Chinese identification.

A public relations employee at 360 Security declined to provide immediate comment. The Cyberspace Administration of China, which regulates the internet, didn’t respond to calls

This Online Service Is Helping Homeowners Renovate Their Yard – All From Their Computer Or Smartphone – Press Release

Using advanced, proprietary technology, ShrubHub Design Experts have been creating stunning landscapes using satellite & terrain imagery. In 2020, it’s about time someone made residential landscaping easier and more affordable.


LAGUNA BEACH, Calif. – October 9, 2020 – (Newswire.com)

Why do yard designs still cost so much money?

How much? Home Advisor conducted a recent study revealing that the average local landscaper charges more than $3,150 per design.

With more and more homeowners investing in their yards every year, people are looking for a more affordable way to build the yard of their dreams.

That’s where ShrubHub Design Experts come in.

Founded by professional landscape designers, each with over 20 years in the industry, ShrubHub streamlines the process of creating a virtual blueprint of your yard. Each customer will have a 1-on-1 consultation with an experienced design expert, where they can build their yard profile and refine their renovation ideas. Then, equipped with the customer’s personal style preferences and access to their yard’s dimensions through satellite imagery, ShrubHub designers get to work.

Customers have the choice to be fully involved in the design process (with daily chat access to their personal designer), or be completely hands-off and let their designer do all the work. Depending on the time of year, and the size of the project, customers receive their complete design package between 3 and 10 days. Each package comes with a product legend (listing every plant & decor piece used), a landscaping ebook, an installation estimate, and access to ShrubHub’s Online Nursery complete with door-to-door expedited shipping.

And if you’re a particularly critical customer, rest assured! You’ll have the chance to revise your design until it meets your high standards.

If you want accent lighting, ShrubHub can do it.
If you want irrigation, ShrubHub can do it.
If

She bootstrapped her company after facing bias. Now she’s helping others do the same.

This story originally ran on CNBC.com

Melissa Bradley’s mission to help women and people of color build their businesses stems from the hardships she faced as a young entrepreneur.

The 52-year-old, co-founder of the mentorship tech platform Ureeka and a Georgetown University professor, started her first company shortly after she graduated from college 30 years ago. The business’s mission was to provide financial literacy services to parents.

Bradley says that when she went to a government agency for a loan, she was told she had three strikes against her: She was Black, she was a woman and the person said she didn’t know any successful Black women in finance.

Bradley, who recently participated in the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and CNBC + Acorns Invest in You’s “Rebuilding Better: A Virtual Town Hall for America’s Small & New Business Owners,” still managed to get her company off the ground. “I bootstrapped,” she recalled. “I kept my day job.”

She ultimately pivoted the business to provide billing and maintaining products and services for other financial advisors and, after a couple of years, sold the company.

“I was tired of the sexism and racism I was experiencing,” she said.

These days, Bradley is trying to bridge the gap between entrepreneurship and equity.

“All of these experiences made me realize that this is even harder for women and people of color because the market is not in our favor,” she said.

“It became super-important for me, even after I became an angel investor, to help people pave their way forward and really tackle the obstacles that are going to come their way.”

To that end, she co-founded 1863 Ventures, which accelerates what she calls “new majority” entrepreneurs — women and people of color — from high growth potential to high growth. These days her