Google labels ACCC’s allegations as ‘narrow’ but will hand over 40 categories of evidence

At Australian Federal Court on Wednesday, Google was ordered to hand over evidence to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) in relation to the watchdog’s allegations that Google mishandled the location data of its users.

The evidence that is to be handed to the ACCC includes over 40 categories of information and data. 

Throughout the day, Google’s legal counsel Robert Yezerski told the court he was concerned that handing over the evidence via discovery would postpone the case’s decision as it is a time consuming and costly process. 

He also labelled the ACCC’s allegations as “very narrow” and brushed off any references to Google’s interface as being a “labyrinth of screens and processes”, explaining that the allegations were only applicable to certain Google account settings and certain screens. 

“The case is very narrow and it’s narrow in three particular respects. First it’s narrow because it’s limited to two Google account settings. These are not device settings and they’re not app settings, being location history and weather activity,” Yezerski said. 

“Second, it’s limited only to statements made about the settings on Android mobile devices and, as I say, that’s significant because these settings can be accessed on other platforms in other ways and there’s no general allegation that everything Google ever said about these particular Google accounts was misleading — it’s only in the context of users who accessed these settings in a particular way.

“Finally, it’s limited to the specific allegations that are [misrepresented by the ACCC].” 

While Justice Thomas Thawley understood the case had significant public importance, he came to the conclusion that the matter’s decision was not so urgent that it had to be heard this year.

Not all of the ACCC’s requests for evidence were accepted, however. Thawley rejected the ACCC’s request for information that was

Amazon’s New Hand Payment Technology Could Change In-Store Shopping Forever

New Amazon technology, introduced at two Amazon Go stores this week, lets shoppers pay for purchases by holding their hands over a scanner. The system, called Amazon One, may herald a new way of identifying yourself and paying for things that could change the way people shop, enter concerts, use public transportation, and many other things.

You’ve probably used a fingerprint scanner or facial recognition to unlock your smartphone. You already know that your voice and your retinas can be used to positively identify you and give you access to your various devices, and possibly to secure government or corporate facilities. Amazon’s new Amazon One technology takes biometrics a step further by allowing shoppers to pay for purchases with a simple scan of their palms.

To stave off privacy concerns, the company says it is encrypting biometric data before storing it in the cloud, and that the data will be deleted from the cloud at the customer’s request. An Amazon executive told GeekWire that the company had deliberately chosen users’ palms as a biometric identifier because people can’t be recognized from their palms the way they can from their faces. (Amazon has faced controversy over law enforcement use of its facial scanning technology and has suspended such use for one year.) Another benefit is that the user must choose to hover his or her hand over the scanner, meaning that users can’t be scanned without their knowledge or consent.

Shopping in 15 seconds?

GeekWire’s Todd Bishop tried Amazon One out at Seattle’s Amazon Go stores and found that his shopping experience was incredibly fast. As the company promised, it took less than a minute to set up the scan of his palm at a small kiosk, linking it with his credit card and mobile number. Amazon Go stores have no

Amazon’s new gadget lets you pay with the palm of your hand

Amazon is getting into palm-reading — but it wants to sell you groceries rather than tell your fortune.

The e-commerce colossus unveiled a new gadget Tuesday that will let shoppers pay with the palms of their hands at its retail stores.

The so-called Amazon One device uses high-tech imaging and algorithms to create a “unique palm signature” based on the hand’s ridges, lines and other features. The system links that imprint to a credit card that the shopper inserts into the machine.

Amazon has installed the system at two of its Amazon Go stores in Seattle, where shoppers can scan their palms before entering instead of using a smartphone app. The company plans to expand the technology to more of its stores in the coming months and said it’s in “active discussions” with several potential outside customers.

“We believe Amazon One has broad applicability beyond our retail stores, so we also plan to offer the service to third parties like retailers, stadiums, and office buildings so that more people can benefit from this ease and convenience in more places,” Dilip Kumar, Amazon’s vice president of physical retail and technology, wrote in a blog post.

The gadget builds on the “Just Walk Out” technology that Amazon uses in its Go stores, which detects the items shoppers pick up and charges them once they leave without the need for a checkout line. Amazon is planning to expand the cashier-less technology to the Whole Foods grocery chain it owns, as The Post reported last month.

While using your hand as a credit card may sound a bit dystopian, Kumar contends that it’s more secure than other “biometric” identifiers because you can’t tell a person’s identity just by looking at their palm.

The palm images Amazon One uses are encrypted and stored in a