Google Chromecast with Google TV review

Chromecast with Google TV

Google

The new $50 Chromecast with Google TV is Google’s first real rival to Roku and Amazon Fire TV. 

It brings a lot of features that never existed on a Chromecast before, such as a full remote and brand-new Google TV software that makes it easier to find movies and TV shows. And it ties into all sorts of services, such as Hulu, HBO Max, Netflix and Disney+.

Previously, the Chromecast let you play content on your computer, but you had to select content on your phone. Now it has a whole new software experience, which makes it feel a lot more like a Roku, an Amazon Fire TV or an Apple TV. It means Google might finally be able to take some market share away from leaders Amazon and Roku.

Here’s what you need to know about it.

What’s good about the Chromecast with Google TV

Chromecast with Google TV

Google

The new Chromecast is super simple to use. You just plug it in to your TV’s HDMI port — every modern TV has one — and turn it on.

The Google TV software has seven menu options at the top of the screen that are really straightforward: Search, For You, Live, Movies, Shows, Apps and Library. I like that the “For You” page pulls in movies and TV shows from subscriptions you pay for, such as Hulu or Netflix, and that you don’t have to open those apps to see what might be popular in any of them.

It also makes recommendations based on shows or movies you’ve watched. Best of all, it doesn’t have any ads, like Roku and Amazon do.

Chromecast with Google TV remote

Google

All of this is easy to navigate with the remote. There’s a button to search by

Google labels ACCC’s allegations as ‘narrow’ but will hand over 40 categories of evidence

At Australian Federal Court on Wednesday, Google was ordered to hand over evidence to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) in relation to the watchdog’s allegations that Google mishandled the location data of its users.

The evidence that is to be handed to the ACCC includes over 40 categories of information and data. 

Throughout the day, Google’s legal counsel Robert Yezerski told the court he was concerned that handing over the evidence via discovery would postpone the case’s decision as it is a time consuming and costly process. 

He also labelled the ACCC’s allegations as “very narrow” and brushed off any references to Google’s interface as being a “labyrinth of screens and processes”, explaining that the allegations were only applicable to certain Google account settings and certain screens. 

“The case is very narrow and it’s narrow in three particular respects. First it’s narrow because it’s limited to two Google account settings. These are not device settings and they’re not app settings, being location history and weather activity,” Yezerski said. 

“Second, it’s limited only to statements made about the settings on Android mobile devices and, as I say, that’s significant because these settings can be accessed on other platforms in other ways and there’s no general allegation that everything Google ever said about these particular Google accounts was misleading — it’s only in the context of users who accessed these settings in a particular way.

“Finally, it’s limited to the specific allegations that are [misrepresented by the ACCC].” 

While Justice Thomas Thawley understood the case had significant public importance, he came to the conclusion that the matter’s decision was not so urgent that it had to be heard this year.

Not all of the ACCC’s requests for evidence were accepted, however. Thawley rejected the ACCC’s request for information that was

Border Patrol Spent $2 Million On Google Maps For A Massive Surveillance Tool

For every person who enters America, a profile is drawn up and a determination made on their risk to national security. It’s the same for any cargo or packages. And it’s all done using a tool known as the Automated Targeting System (ATS). This decades-old technology helps border staff decide whether or not you or a shipment needs to be pulled aside for further inspection before being allowed into the country.

Run by Customs and Border Protection, it’s been controversial since the mid-2000s, when the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) pivoted its use from just targeting cargo to tracking people. Though it’s primarily engineered by lesser-known tech contractors, one of the technologies the ATS uses is Google Maps. Through a review of government contract records and a FOIA request response, Forbes has learned that the CBP has spent at least $2 million in the last three years on the Google mapping software to support ATS, which critics say is a secretive, “terrifying,” huge surveillance system, one that draws in personal and location data from a vast number of government and commercial databases to make its risk assessments. 

Whilst ATS can help investigators target individuals or packages that have been making suspicious trips to places of interest, such as Syria or Afghanistan, its use on any visitor to America makes it particularly troubling for privacy advocates. And CBP’s use of Google technology could be problematic for a tech giant whose own employees have voiced anger about its work with Trump’s immigration agencies.

“ATS is sort of this terrifying master database of vast quantities of personally identifiable information that’s being funneled in from dozens of different law enforcement and other databases,” said John Davidson, lead counsel at the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), who said the use of Google tech in

Snap Taps Facebook, Google Alum Alexa Levine as U.S. Head of Entertainment Sales

Snap, parent company of Snapchat, has hired Alexa Levine as U.S. head of entertainment.

Levine comes to Snap from Facebook, where she worked for three years oversaw the company’s film, TV, streaming and live event ad clients as industry manager for entertainment. Prior to joining Facebook in 2017, she had a variety of roles at Google — including, most recently, senior account executive, media and entertainment — as well as Microsoft and ad agency Omnicom.

At Snap, Levine is responsible for leading the company’s entertainment sales team and working with U.S. entertainment clients advertising on the platform. Based in Los Angeles. Levine reports to Clayton Peters, U.S. head of verticals, who oversees Snap’s enterprise verticals.

Levine holds a bachelor’s degree in business and hotel management from Cornell University and an MBA from the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan.

Snap continues to bulk up its originals slate for Snapchat. Earlier this month, it premiered “Coach Kev” starring Kevin Hart and announced three docuseries coming to the platform in 2021 following Loren Gray, Trippie Redd and Swae Lee. On the ad front, Snap announced that it is rolling out First Commercial, a takeover offering that guarantees advertisers that Snapchat users see their non-skippable 6-second ad before any other spots on the app on a given day, to be widely available in the U.S. and U.K. this month.

As of the end of June 2020, Snapchat reported 238 million daily active users, up 17% year-over-year. The company claims Snapchat reaches over 100 million people in the U.S. alone, including over 90% of 13-24 year-olds and over 75% of 13-34 year-olds.

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Google Podcasts Manager shows you search impressions and clicks from Google Search

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