PC Sales Continue Surging — And That’s Good News for Intel, AMD and Others

PC sales remain on the upswing thanks to purchases made to support remote workers and learners. And it looks as if there’s still a lot of pent-up demand going into the holiday season.

Research firm IDC estimates PC shipments rose 14.6% annually in Q3 to 81.3 million. That compares with 11.2% shipment growth in Q2, and just 2.7% growth in 2019.

Officially, Gartner estimates PC shipments rose just 3.6% to 71.4 million. However, when including Chromebook sales (counted in IDC’s official estimate), Gartner’s estimate for shipment growth rises to 9%.

Along with Chromebooks, Q3 was a strong quarter for gaming PCs and (in certain cases) notebooks with cellular modems, according to IDC. On the flip side, desktop demand was said to be weak in the U.S. and EMEA. Desktop PC sales depend heavily on purchases made to support corporate offices, many of which are of course empty right now.

Demand for gaming products has been strong pretty much across the board in recent months: In September, supplies of graphics cards based on Nvidia’s  (NVDA) – Get Report new GeForce RTX 3080 and 3090 gaming GPUs quickly sold out at major retailers, and Sony  (SNE) – Get Report and Microsoft  (MSFT) – Get Report both saw strong pre-orders for their next-gen consoles.

Between them, top-3 PC OEMs Lenovo, HP  (HPQ) – Get Report and Dell Technologies  (DELL) – Get Report accounted for 61.5% of Q3 shipments, per IDC. Lenovo and HP’s shipments were each estimated to be up more than 11%, while Dell’s shipments, which skew heavily towards corporate buyers, were estimated to have dropped slightly.

Apple  (AAPL) – Get Report, whose Mac revenue rose 22% annually during its June quarter, was estimated to have an 8.5% unit

Is Major Cineplex Group A Good Stock To Buy?

Major Cineplex Group PCL (OTC:MCGRF) is a leading cinema operator in Thailand with 815 screens in Thailand and neighboring countries. It has a considerable contribution to the growth of Thai box office. The company has a strong growth and upside potential, according to a thesis by AsianCenturyStocks.

Assuming a full recovery in cinema attendance by 2022, the stock will trade at a 2023e PE ratio of 10.3x, offering upside of +85% if the stock were to trade at its historical average PE ratio of 19x. This multiple is well justified given the long runway of growth, limited debt, excellent management team and high return on capital, according to the thesis.

theater, theatre, stand, worker, food, counter, concession, cold, bar, retail, movie, business, snack, drink, cinema, adult, tub, cap, occupation, service, caucasian, female
theater, theatre, stand, worker, food, counter, concession, cold, bar, retail, movie, business, snack, drink, cinema, adult, tub, cap, occupation, service, caucasian, female

Tyler Olson/Shutterstock.com

At a point where European and North American box offices are struggling with their revenue statistics, Major Cineplex is growing at 10-15% every year. The number of screens per capita in Malaysia is only 13% of that in United States. The Thai box office is outperforming its competitors with a considerable margin. It has greatly utilized the opportunities and capitalized on them, thus giving Major Cineplex a fruitful outcome.

During the lockdowns of COVID-19, Major Cineplex witnessed some hard times. A few months of full closure of cinemas led to cash burn. Since the entire operation was closed across the country and worldwide, the revenue was stagnant. Although the operations for the company re-opened, the capacity of watchers is only 25%. Looking into the financial aspects, some investors may have considered that during the pandemic, the competitors like Netflix (NFLX) may have captured the industry. But, according to the thesis, Major Cineplex remains unaffected from Netflix which started its operations in 2017 in Thailand.

The advantageous

Tesla Model 3 Price Too High? Dirt-Cheap Used Electric Cars Can Be Good Deals

The used EV has arrived.

It was only nine years ago that the first won’t-break-the-bank electric cars arrived.

Those non-Tesla EVs — like the Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt — weren’t priced at $80,000 like the Model S and the first- and second- generations of those cars have been hitting the used car market over the last several years.

And with a Long Range 2020 Tesla Model 3 starting at about $47,000, “dirt cheap” for an EV is anything under $20,000.

A couple of the better sites for used EVs are MYEV and CarGurus.

Most of the used EVs cited below are first- and second-generation electrics that were sold roughly between 2011 and 2017.

Note: all prices are based on a used vehicle with under 40,000 miles. Price ranges are typical but some listings may be lower or higher:

Table notes:

*Used Nissan Leaf EPA-rated battery range depends on year and model: typically, the older (pre-2018), cheaper Leaf models have 107 miles of range while the newer have 150 miles. The oldest Leaf models have a range from approximately 70 to 84 miles. I am not including the oldest 70-75 mile range models, which typically start at about $5,000.

*Used Volkswagen e-Golf EPA-rated battery range depends on year and model: typically, the older (pre-2018), cheaper e-Golf models have 83 miles of range while the newer have 125 miles.

**Chevy Volt is an EV but is also referred to as a plug-in hybrid because it has a range-extending gas-engine generator that boosts the total range to 420 miles

It’s Not Good News, Insider Claims

Apple AirTags, the highly anticipated location trackers that have been on the horizon for ages, it seems, are not about to be announced alongside the iPhone 12 at Apple’s big event next week.

MORE FROM FORBESAlongside iPhone 12, Apple Event Will Reveal HomePod Mini, Report Claims

That’s according to the highly reliable tipster Jon Prosser, who has tweeted: “This one hurts my heart: I’m being told that Apple has pushed back the announcement and launch of AirTags to March of 2021.”

Well, that’s a shame. AirTags not only sound fantastic but images of them exactly match the central image on next week’s Apple Event invitation, that is, the Apple logo on a circular device.

Assuming that visual similarity isn’t a coincidence – and this is Apple, so there ain’t no such thing as an accident here – it suggests that until very recently, that is, more recently even than when the invites were sent out, Apple was planning to release the AirTags next Tuesday, October 13.

After all, AirTags are expected to provide of the first major uses for the Ultra Wide Band chip introduced in the iPhone 11.

MORE FROM FORBESApple October 13 Special Event: Exactly What We Can Deduce From The Invite

It’s hard to guess why the products would have been delayed. Is it the incipient legal stand-off between Tile and Apple?

Could it be that there’s just too much stuff to be announced this week? It could be that but in that case there’s rumored to be another event scheduled for November, so it could simply have been bumped to that.

Spring sounds like a definite decision, suggesting either that something isn’t quite right or a change in strategy.

It’s disappointing

Good Life Center offers virtual programming

Karen Lin, Contributing Photographer

While the pandemic has closed off physical access to Yale’s Good Life Center,Oliv the center’s team is continuing to provide virtual programming for students.

The Good Life Center — launched in 2018 after Silliman Head of College Laurie Santos’ class “Psychology and the Good Life” drew over 1,000 enrollees — is normally housed in the fourth floor of Silliman College. According to the center’s website, the Good Life Center is “a cultivated space to inspire, teach, and practice living the good life.” In a normal year, students could spend time in the center’s lounge, which features a tea station and physical comforts corner. They could also visit the study or the sandbox — a silent, tech-free zone. Although students cannot use these spaces now, weekly newsletters from the GLC advertise various Zoom events.

“I think in some ways the virtual format has actually made our events more accessible,” GLC Woodbridge Fellow Alexa Vaghenas ’20 said. “Students can easily pop into a workshop or guided meditation as they please, for instance, without having to travel to Silliman College.”

According to Santos, who founded the center, the GLC has been able to keep much of its old programming, including meditation classes, yoga and wellness chats.

Recently publicized virtual events include “Mindfulness and Gratitude Meditation” — which currently runs on Thursdays and Sundays — high-intensity interval training workouts and an upcoming workshop on how to feel “focused and organized” by paying attention to study space setup.

“We’ve also developed some new programming specifically for the current situation,” Santos wrote in an email to the News.

Santos explained that Vaghenas has designed a new series of events relevant to the current conditions on how athletes are handling the change that comes with losing normal season programming. The program is a