Tech Founder Hadiyah Mujhid Partners With AnnenbergTech And PledgeLA To Create Equity For Black And Latinx VC’s And Founders

In business, it takes money to make money. Yet for many Black and Latinx founders, access to capital is a barrier to entry into their respective industries. Another barrier is often access to venture capitalists who come from similar backgrounds as them, who understand them, and who believe in their ideas and businesses enough to invest in them.

According to research, only 1% of VC-backed companies have Black founders, and only 2% of firms have investment team members who identify as Black. 

San Francisco based technologist, Hadiyah Mujhid, has been solving for that equity problem as the founder and CEO of HBCUvc. Prominently known for building pathways for underrepresented investors and founders, HBCUvc has led the charge on developing the next generation of venture capital leaders from Historically Black Colleges and Universities through their strategic programming and partnerships. With the perspective that culture is a currency, Mujhid and her team nurture budding entrepreneurs and investors through training, coaching, mentoring, and immersive fellowships that are culturally responsive and inclusive for everyone involved.

“I like to think that our program is extremely comprehensive, and it’s culturally affirming of the identities that people bring to the space,” said Mujhid.

HBCUvc offers core programming throughout the year for HBCU students and alumni. And in the summer, they work with AnnenbergTech and PledgeLA to host a venture capital internship which places Black and Latinx interns at esteemed VC firms like Stat Zero and Crosscut Ventures.

As a part of the PledgeLA program, “We [HBCUvc] spend two weeks doing an immersive training with the fellows in LA and then they are placed with a firm for 8 weeks. During those 8 weeks, we still do one-on-one coaching support,” said Mujhid.

As firms and startups work

John McAfee, McAfee Associates Founder, Indicted on Tax Evasion Charges

John McAfee, a computer programmer best known for his anti-virus software, has been indicted on federal tax evasion charges after allegedly hiding assets from the IRS, including real property, a vehicle, and a yacht, the Department of Justice said Monday. McAfee, the founder of McAfee Associates, has been charged with tax evasion and willful failure to file tax returns, according to an unsealed June indictment following his arrest in Spain. Prosecutors allege McAfee earned millions of dollars from promoting cryptocurrencies, consulting, speaking engagements, and selling his life story for a documentary—but failed to file tax returns from 2014 and 2018. To avoid tax liability, McAfee allegedly directed his income to several bank accounts and cryptocurrency accounts and bought several items, including real estate, a yacht, and a car. The indictment, however, does not allege McAfee received any income from the anti-virus company he once founded.

The announcement comes just hours after the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) sued McAfee for allegedly making over $23.1 million in undisclosed compensation by recommending seven cryptocurrency offerings on Twitter that were false or misleading. “Potential investors in digital asset securities are entitled to know if promoters were compensated by the issuers of those securities,” Kristina Littman, Cyber Unit Chief said in a statement, adding that McAfee “allegedly leveraged his fame to deceptively tout numerous digital asset securities to his followers without informing investors of his role as a paid promoter.”

Read it at Department of Justice

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Software company founder McAfee charged with tax evasion

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Antivirus software entrepreneur John McAfee has been charged with evading taxes after failing to report income made from promoting cryptocurrencies while he did consulting work, made speaking engagements and sold the rights to his life story for a documentary, prosecutors in Tennessee said Monday.

A June indictment charging McAfee with tax evasion and willful failure to file tax returns was unsealed in federal court in Memphis on Monday after McAfee’s arrest in Spain, where extradition to the U.S. is pending, the U.S. attorney’s office said in a news release.

Online court records do not show whether McAfee has a lawyer to speak on his behalf about the charges.


McAfee developed early internet security software and has been sought by authorities in the U.S. and Belize in the past.

The indictment said McAfee failed to file tax returns from 2014 to 2018, despite receiving “considerable income” from several sources. The indictment does not allege that McAfee received any income or had any connection with the antivirus software company bearing his name during those years, prosecutors said.

McAfee evaded taxes by directing his income to be paid into bank accounts and cryptocurrency exchange accounts in the names of others, the indictment said. McAfee hid assets from the Internal Revenue Service, including real estate property, a vehicle and a yacht, in the names of others, prosecutors said.

If convicted of all charges, McAfee could face up to 30 years in prison.

McAfee was released from detention in the Dominican Republic in July 2019 after he and five others were suspected of traveling on a yacht carrying high-caliber weapons, ammunition and military-style gear, officials in the Caribbean Island said at the time.

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Coinbase and Clubhouse aside, Ethel’s Club founder wants to take us ‘Somewhere Good’

Welcome back to Human Capital, a weekly digest about diversity, inclusion and the human labor that powers tech.

This week, we’re looking at a number of topics because a lot went down. Coinbase CEO Brian Armstrong took a controversial stance on social, Clubhouse found itself under scrutiny again, but this time around anti-Semitism and a new site launched that sheds light on some of the negative experiences of underrepresented people in tech. Meanwhile, the founder from Ethel’s Club unveiled Somewhere Good, which aims to provide a safe social platform for people of color. The timing couldn’t be better.

Human Capital launches as a newsletter on Friday, October 23. Be sure to sign up here to get it sent straight to your inbox. 

Stay Woke

Coinbase CEO’s stance on societal issues stirs up controversy 

Over the weekend, Coinbase CEO Brian Armstrong said the company does not engage on border societal issues when they are not related to its core mission. On political causes, Armstrong said Coinbase also does not advocate for any causes or candidates that are not related to its mission “because it is a distraction from our mission.” In that Medium post, Armstrong recognized that some employees may disagree and even resign. 

A couple of days later, Armstrong began offering employees who don’t feel comfortable with the direction of the company a severance package, The Block Crypto reported

“It’s always sad when we see teammates go, but it can also be what is best for them and the company,” Armstrong wrote in an internal memo. “As I said in my blog post, life is too short to work a company that you aren’t excited about.”

It’s quite a statement to make just weeks away from a very important presidential election. But Armstrong’s justification seems to be that he

Programming languages: Java founder James Gosling reveals more on Java and Android

James Gosling, the father of Java, one of the world’s most widely used programming languages, has talked with research scientist Lex Fridman about Java’s origins and his motivations for creating a language that would be used on tens of billions of devices and become central to the development of Android at Google. 

Gosling designed Java 25 years ago while at Sun Microsystems. In 2009, Java would be one of the key reasons Oracle acquired Sun. According to Oracle, today there are 51 billion active Java Virtual Machines (JVMs) deployed globally. 

But long before Oracle’s acquisition of Sun, Gosling said he and a team at Sun “kind of worried that there was stuff going on in the universe of computing that the computing industry was missing out on” – what would become today’s Internet of Things.

“It was all about what was happening in terms of computing hardware, processors and networking that was outside the computing industry,” he said. 

“That was everything from the early glimmers of cell phones that were happening then to – you look at elevators and locomotives and process-control systems in factories and all kinds of audio and video equipment.  

“They all had processors in them they were all doing stuff with them and it felt like there was something going on there that we needed to understand.” 

At that stage C and C++ “absolutely owned the universe” and everything was being written in those languages. 

Gosling says his team went on several “epic road trips” around 1990 to visit Toshiba, Sharp, Mitsubishi and Sony in Japan, Samsung and several other South Korean companies, and went “all over Europe” to visit the likes of Philips, Siemens and Thomson. 

“One of the things that leapt out was that they were doing all the usual computer things that people