The 2020 Family Office Software Roundup

Selecting the right software is one of the most critical and daunting tasks businesses face. As the digital revolution unfolds, an increasing number of processes are digitized, consolidated and automated using software solutions. Today most industries have easily identifiable software frontrunners, yet the private wealth- and family office segment still suffers from fragmentation, a lack of clarity and transparency.

For many family offices, the process can be time and resource-intensive — with limitations discovered after purchase, having serious consequences for productivity and costs. According to Bijan Farsijani, who heads research & insights at Simple, “Choosing software solutions for family offices is a pain – not least because providers and family offices speak different languages. Where providers talk about features, family offices talk about use cases. Culture, geography and regulation further complicate things.”

In order to identify these needs and explore how different software providers tackle this product-market fit, the Simple team conducted The Family Office Software Review. One outcome of the research is standardised categories that help family offices to get a better understanding of what providers offer and what their limitations are.

Outlined below is a roundup of the software providers, alongside the unique value propositions that family offices should be looking out for.

Addepar

Based in the USA, Addepar is a wealth management platform that infuses complex financial information with transparency. By connecting data, technology and people, it facilitates informed decisions through actionable insights and tailored reporting allows multi-generational family offices to achieve their objectives.

Allvue Systems

USA-based Allvue Systems is a software solution providing flexible and customizable accounting, monitoring and reporting.

Brockton community center goes virtual, provides free, family friendly programming amid COVID – News – The Enterprise, Brockton, MA

The Brockton Family and Community Center first opened in North Middle School in January to offer free, family friendly programming to members of the community.

BROCKTON — With the coronavirus pandemic forcing the Brockton Family and Community Center to close its physical doors to the public just a couple months after its opening, providers at the center have gone virtual to continue serving the community.

The Brockton Family and Community Center first opened in North Middle School in January to offer free, family friendly programming to members of the community in the evenings and on weekends using CORI-approved providers. With the school anticipated to sit empty for over a year before renovations on the building begin, school officials and members of the community teamed up to use the space in the meantime for the community center.

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But the closure of nonessential businesses and organizations in March forced them to close and try moving operations online. Virtual offerings have included parenting classes and family engagement activities, support groups, assistance in applying for scholarships and financial aid, tutoring, robotics and resume help. When the building was open, other services included theater classes, English classes, pick-up basketball games and Zumba classes.

One virtual activity includes free yoga classes and one-on-one sessions by Johanne Barthold, an Ashtanga and hatha yoga provider. While she’s had a couple participants so far, Barthold said she’s trying to get the word out about her class, especially with the benefits yoga has with mindfulness and relaxation, providing non-strenuous physical activity and helping with conditions, such as

Gov. Ivey announces creation of Alabama Family Central website







Gov. Ivey announces creation of Alabama Family Central website

Gov. Kay Ivey has announced the creation of the Alabama Family Central website that is designed to help connect parents and caregivers with resources.



Kay Ivey sitting at a table


© Provided by WZDX Huntsville


RELATED: Gov. Ivey announces more than $11M in federal assistance for Alabama hurricane survivors

“Alabama Family Central will ensure that all parents and children in our state have access to crucial information and resources from numerous state agencies and non-profit organizations,” Gov. Ivey said. “Great parents need strong partners, and I am proud of the strong collaboration between

If your friends or family have fallen for an internet conspiracy cult, here’s what you should do | QAnon

How do you rescue someone you love from the clutches of an internet conspiracy cult?

Do you maybe tell them that the operator of the “most prominent” website devoted to the unhinged, fact-free QAnon conspiracy theory was recently rumbled as a senior vice-president at Citibank?

According to reports, Jason Gelinas was a “longtime Wall Street IT expert” with a noteworthy professional interest in data mining. He perhaps knew better than most how susceptible people are to advertising when they’re angry and they’re frightened; reports claim he was earning $US3,000 a month from Q-adherents on his Patreon site, and suspected of compiling data on 10 million site visitors willing to believe – without evidence – that a network of Hollywood satanists run vast underground camps where raped children are milked for blood. It’s an unquestioning credulity that would have any marketer salivating.

Alas, the truth has done little to dissuade QAnon believers from the fictions of their conspiracy mythology. Unsurprisingly, the “Pizzagate” conspiracy that was QAnon’s forerunner should have fallen apart when an adherent wielded an assault rifle in a Washington pizzeria because he believed Hillary Clinton and her associates were running a child sex ring in its basement. The gunman found no Clinton, no children and no basement – and yet the themes of the conspiracy endure, and internationally. Yes, we have a QAnon problem in Australia now, too.

The conspiracy is finding ready purchase because those themes are already culturally familiar, sourced from millennia of antisemitic tropes that falsely accuse Jews of drinking the blood of Christian children; it’s no coincidence Jewish identities like George Soros and the Rothschilds are referenced in attacks. The present amplification coincides with the pandemic’s ratcheting up of individual anxiety at the same time it’s obliged people into finding longed-for socialisation on the internet.