More Bad News For Apple As iPhone 13 Design Exposed

Apple’s iPhone 12 range has been revealed in detail and it brings several compromises which might put you off upgrading. But if you’re still on the fence, the first iPhone 13 information should convince you to save your money. 

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Just days before the iPhone 12 big reveal, respected industry insiders Jon Prosser, Ice Universe and Ross Young have all revealed Apple is set to make the design and display changes everyone wanted for the iPhone 12 series. 

Both Prosser and Ice Universe agree that Apple will finally reduce the size of the notch with iPhone 13. That said, they disagree on how this will be done. Ice Universe states that Apple will make it shallower (vertically) while Prosser understands that Apple will make it shorter (horizontally). The disagreement likely stems from Apple having multiple prototypes at this stage of development, something that has caused confusion before. Either way, it’s a win. 

Building on this, display specialist Ross Young reveals the iPhone 13 will reintroduce Touch ID (likely in-display and pandemic driven) alongside Face ID, come with larger camera sensors than the iPhone 12 models and adopt LTPO panels. LTPO is extremely power efficient and was expected to enable 120Hz ProMotion displays on the iPhone 12 line-up, but Samsung reserved all available stock for its Galaxy Note 20 Ultra this year and ProMotion was scrapped. The iPhone 13 will fix this. 

A further inevitable benefit will be 5G. While the iPhone 12 line-up all have 5G, speeds will be limited outside the US due to high pricing and restricted availability. Expect 5G modems to be cheaper,

Prison video visitation system exposed calls between inmates and lawyers

Prison video visitation systems are sometimes the only way family and lawyers can talk to inmates, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, but the security of those systems recently suffered a major lapse. Researcher Bob Diachenko told TechCrunch that video visitation provider HomeWAV left a database dashboard publicly accessible without a password since April, exposing “thousands” of calls between inmates and their attorneys. Anyone could read call logs and transcripts.

HomeWAV shut down the dashboard shortly after TC reported the issue. Company chief John Best confirmed the incident and said that a third-party vendor inadvertently removed the password restriction that kept the server private. He also promised to notify inmates, their families and lawyers.

It’s a particularly serious violation. While many US prisons record calls, they’re not supposed to monitor calls with lawyers due to attorney-client privilege — this suggests the calls were recorded in spite of that rule. And when the pandemic prevents in-person visitations, there’s a good chance that more of these calls were intercepted than usual.

This isn’t the only breach in recent months. Diachenko pointed out a flaw at TelMate that left millions of prisoner messages exposed. However, that just underscores the problem — inmates’ security and privacy issues frequently appear to go unnoticed.

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