France’s Health Data Hub to move to European cloud infrastructure to avoid EU-US data transfers

France’s data regulator CNIL has issued some recommendations for French services that handle health data, as Mediapart first reported. Those services should avoid using American cloud hosting companies altogether, such as Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud.

Those recommandations follow a landmark ruling by Europe’s top court in July. The ruling, dubbed Schrems II, struck down the EU-US Data Privacy Shield. Under the Privacy Shield, companies could outsource data processing from the EU to the US in bulk. Due to concerns over US surveillance laws, that mechanism is no longer allowed.

The CNIL is going one step further by saying that services and companies that handle health data should also avoid doing business with American companies — it’s not just about processing European data in Europe. Once again, this is all about avoiding falling under U.S. regulation and rulings.

The regulator sent those recommendations to one of France’s top courts (Conseil d’État). SantéNathon, a group of organizations and unions, originally notified the CNIL over concerns about France’s Health Data Hub.

France is currently building a platform to store health data at the national level. The idea is to build a hub that makes it easier to study rare diseases and use artificial intelligence to improve diagnoses. It is supposed to aggregate data from different sources and make it possible to share some data with public and private institutions for those specific cases.

The technical choices have been controversial as the French government originally chose to partner with Microsoft and its cloud platform Microsoft Azure.

Microsoft, like many other companies, relies on Standard Contractual Clauses for EU-US data transfers. But the Court of Justice of the EU has made it clear that EU regulators have to intervene if data is being transferred to an unsafe country when

U.S. Sanctions Turn up Heat but Huawei Serving European 5G Clients, Executive Says | Top News

ZURICH (Reuters) – Chinese telecom giant Huawei is finding it harder to counter U.S. sanctions designed to choke off its access to semiconductors but can continue to serve European 5G network clients, a senior European executive told an Austrian newspaper.

The world’s biggest maker of mobile telecommunications equipment and smartphones was still “looking for a solution” to help millions of Huawei phone users after Google

was banned from providing technical support for new Huawei phone models using mobile operating system Android.

“Since the U.S. sanctions last year, U.S. manufacturers of semiconductors are no longer allowed to supply us so our previous U.S. partners can no longer work with us. Since August it has become even more difficult,” Abraham Liu, Huwaei’s vice-president for Europe, told the Kurier paper.

He said Washington was “blackmailing” chipmakers into shunning ties with Huawei, which denies U.S. allegations that Huawei equipment could be used by Beijing for spying.

“Nevertheless, we are confident that we can continue to serve our European customers in the 5G sector because of many preparations and upfront investments with the most advanced technology,” Liu was quoted as saying without elaborating.

“As for private customers, cell phone owners, we see great difficulties. There are 90 million European Huawei users. Google is no longer allowed to work with Huawei, so Google will no longer publish updates for Huawei smartphones with the Android operating system,” he said. “We are still looking for a solution.”

Amid U.S. pressure to exclude the Chinese firm from supplying key telecoms equipment, Orange

and Proximus last week picked Nokia

to help build 5G networks in Belgium.

EU members have been stepping up scrutiny of so-called high-risk vendors. This subjects Huawei’s governance and technology to critical examination and is likely to lead other European operators to strip it from their networks,

Here are the top European startups where people want to work in 2020

  • LinkedIn published its Top Startups of 2020, which features the startups its users most want to work for in different countries.
  • Featured companies in Europe include transportation startups such as Arrival and Dott; neo-banks such as Revolut and N26; and health startups like Doctolib.
  • We’ve got exclusive data on the top startups across six European countries, and ranked the first five for each.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

LinkedIn has released its annual ranking of the hottest startups to work for.

The list is based on how half a billion LinkedIn users interact with startups on the site across four areas: user engagement with the company and its employees, employee growth, job applications started on LinkedIn, and how often people working for firms on LinkedIn’s top companies list — a different list of firms with over 500 employees — move over to these startups. 

Business Insider got exclusive data from LinkedIn on its top-ranked startups across six European countries — the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, and the Netherlands.

To be eligible for the list, companies had to be founded in the last seven years, privately held, and headquartered in the country on whose list they appear. The firms had to have a minimum of 50 employees — so the list excludes some smaller startups. 

Scroll down to see the list of the top 30 startups across Europe. We’ve ranked the top five from each of the six European countries below. 

The UK

Arrival is the top startup in the UK

Founded in 2015, Oxford-based startup Arrival is working on prototypes for electric vehicles including buses and delivery vans.

Arrival’s position in the ranking reflects the rise of electric vehicle sales in Europe in the first quarter of 2020. According to the latest McKinsey report, the number

European stock picks to buy, avoid in COVID recovery: Morgan Stanley

  • Morgan Stanley research teams, in a research note, outline the activity-based stocks that are still discounted for a post-COVID recovery across five different sectors.
  • Morgan Stanley recommends investors think about individual stocks instead of sectors.
  • “The bifurcation between winners and losers within sectors is arguably best exemplified within Retail – in aggregate, the sector has been a strong outperformer this year, but this largely reflects single-stock stories,” Morgan Stanley’s equity analyst, Jamie Rollo, said in a note.
  • Click here to sign up for our weekly newsletter Investing Insider.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Morgan Stanley brought together five separate equity research teams to understand which European activity-based stocks damaged by the pandemic were still discounted for a post-COVID recovery, in a new research note released this week.

The investment bank is thinking ahead to recovery based on its biotech team expecting phase three vaccine results by November and a “broadly available vaccine” toward the end of the first quarter in 2021.

“Once a vaccine is widely available, we expect mobility to pick up significantly and activity-based stocks to benefit,” said Morgan Stanley’s equity analyst, Jamie Rollo, in the report.

The new research report finds that broadly most activity-based sectors seem cheap when comparing the 2022 EBITDA forecast to historic results.

Despite most sectors appearing cheap, Morgan Stanley recommends investors think about individual stocks instead of sectors.

“The bifurcation between winners and losers within sectors is arguably best exemplified within retail – in aggregate, the sector has been a strong outperformer this year, but this largely reflects single-stock stories,” Rollo said.

Sector stock picks

Here are some of the stocks Morgan Stanley recommends considering and avoiding within each sector for a post COVID-19 recovery.

Leisure & Hotel Stocks

1) Sodexo

Sodexo stock on October 2

Sodexo stock on October 2

Business Insider Markets


Ticker:

European Leaders Ask Commission to Name Areas of Strategic EU Weakness | World News

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – European Union leaders asked their Brussels-based executive on Friday to name strategic areas where the bloc relies too much on countries such as China and the United States, and to propose ways to make amends.

EU leaders said their industry needed to be more competitive, autonomous and resilient after the COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the bloc’s dependence on Chinese components in the production of drugs.

In their decision following a two-day summit in Brussels, the leaders told “the Commission to identify strategic dependencies, particularly in the most sensitive industrial ecosystems such as for health, and to propose measures to reduce these dependencies.”

There is also mounting concern that the 27-nation bloc is lagging the United States in the design and manufacture of batteries and in digital cloud storage.

The EU has set digital and green technologies as priorities and wants to help shift the economy using much of its 750-billion-euro ($890-dollar) fund for kick-starting growth after the pandemic.

Leaders named the European Battery Alliance, the Internet of Things and Clean Hydrogen Alliance as projects for the EU to focus on. They also called for the development of new industrial alliances, including on raw materials, micro-processors, telecommunication networks, low-carbon industries, and Industrial Clouds and Platforms.

The leaders agreed that “a significant part” of the 1.8 trillion euros that will be available to EU countries under the bloc’s budget for 2021-27 and the linked recovery fund should be go towards supercomputers and quantum computing, blockchain, human-centred Artificial Intelligence, microprocessors, 5G networks, secure communications and cyber protection.

(Reporting by Jan Strupczewski)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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