Inbox zero: 5 email hacks and keyboard shortcuts from an email expert

Working professionals spend, on average, 28% of their working day reading and answering emails, according to a McKinsey analysis. For the average full-time worker in America, that amounts to 2.6 hours and 120 messages per day.

Rahul Vohra is the CEO and founder of Superhuman, a subscription email app that promises a faster, streamlined experience. Superhuman is popular in Silicon Valley, counting execs from firms such as Slack, Spotify, and Dropbox among its clients.

Vohra is a two-time founder in Silicon Valley and has been figuring out how to make email better since 2010, when he launched Rapportive, an earlier version of Superhuman that sold to LinkedIn in 2012. 

While working at LinkedIn, Vohra noticed that many professionals didn’t read most emails to save time, he said. So in 2014, Vohra launched Superhuman, raising a total of $33 million in funding over four rounds. In 2019, the email software quadruped its business and hit $20 million in revenues according to Forbes.

Read on to see Vohra’s five tips to boost email productivity and get to inbox zero.

Learn email keyboard shortcuts

It’s worth Googling for the most common email shortcuts for whatever software you use. Gmail and Outlook for example have a dedicated page dedicated to shortcuts. “You need to use an email client that has world-class keyboard shortcuts,” Vohra said. 

Free software won’t have a vast range of shortcuts, but most have ways to quickly star, archive, and delete emails.

For example with Gmail, if you activate your keyboard shortcuts on ‘Settings’, you can press ‘r’ to reply to and email or ‘f’ to forward the email. But also, add CC recipients by pressing ⌘/Ctrl + Shift + c. 

Use follow-up reminders

Instead of going through your inbox when needing to follow-up, check for a reminder or snooze icon

Centro Launches Email & SMS Workflow Steps to Create Customer Cadences and Series in Slack

Centro’s steps in Slack’s Workflow Builder allow teams to collaborate together on important customer communications, enriched with Salesforce data, without leaving Slack

Centro, a shared inbox and Salesforce connector in Slack, today announced its release of Email and SMS steps within Slack’s Workflow Builder. The steps allow sales and revenue teams to craft automated customer communications within Slack. The emails can be crafted and placed in a series so that no customer email or messaging is lost. If the customer doesn’t respond, predetermined reminders will be sent out. Any responses will be visible to the team in Slack, and anyone in the Slack channel can respond, allowing teams to quickly address customer needs.

Slack is the leading channel-based messaging platform, used by millions to align their teams, unify their systems, and drive their businesses forward. Workflow Builder is a visual tool that allows any Slack user to automate routine tasks by creating custom workflows. In less than a year, Workflow Builder has seen significant adoption in Slack, with more than 25M workflows launched.

Centro decided to bring customer communications into Slack channels because users are already connected to Slack appropriately 10 hours a day.

“We know Slack users spend most of their day in Slack, and often prefer communications to reside there,” says Ryan Hitchler, CEO and Co-Founder at Centro. “We aim to bring all communication to where people are happy and responsive, including external communications to customers. Our Salesforce connector provides the exact information to the revenue teams at their fingertips to surround their customer. The Slack Workflow Builder makes this effort so much more powerful. No more forgetting to follow up with a non-responsive customer. With its Slack integration, Centro keeps you on the ball.”

Slack’s Workflow Builder allows companies like Centro to provide their functions to a

Grindr flaw allowed hijacking accounts with just an email address

A Grindr vulnerability allowed anyone who knows a user’s email address to easily reset their password and hijack their account. All a bad actor needed to do was type in a user’s email address in the password reset page and then pop open the dev tools to get the reset token. By adding that token to the end of the password reset URL, they won’t even need to access the victim’s inbox — that’s the exact link sent to the user’s email anyway. It loads the page where they can input a new password, giving them a way to ultimately take over the victim’s account.



BERLIN, GERMANY - APRIL 22: The logo of the dating app for gay and bisexual men Grindr is shown on the display of a smartphone on April 22, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images)


BERLIN, GERMANY – APRIL 22: The logo of the dating app for gay and bisexual men Grindr is shown on the display of a smartphone on April 22, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images)

A French security researcher named Wassime Bouimadaghene discovered the flaw and tried to report it to the dating service. When support closed his ticket and he didn’t hear back, he asked help from security expert Troy Hunt who worked with another security expert (Scott Helme) to set up a test account and confirm that the vulnerability does exist. Hunt, who called the issue “one of the most basic account takeover techniques” he’s ever seen, managed to get in touch with Grindr’s security team directly by posting a call for their contact details on Twitter.

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While Grindr quickly fixed the issue after hearing from Hunt, the incident underscored the platform’s shortcomings when it comes to security. And that’s a huge problem when the dating app caters to individuals whose sexual orientations and identities could make them a target for harassment and violence. This isn’t the first security issue Grindr has had to deal with. Back