The Attack On The American Dream May Destroy The Economy

The 2020 visa suspension has vehemently added to the dozens of telling systematic changes that took effect in America over the last four years, part of an ongoing battle to change the American ethos around immigration and mitigate its importance to the growth and prosperity of the country.

Ran Harnevo, CEO of Homeis, is a technology entrepreneur and an immigrant himself, whose company represents those who often are not. Homeis offers an in-app community for immigrants and a safe space for users to ask about anything from visas to health care. Over the past few months, the platform has transformed into a digital COVID-19 and visa resource center that houses the most up-to-date, accurate info about how the pandemic uniquely impacts immigrants’ specific circumstances and visa status in the U.S. In fact, the visa’s suspension was the single most trafficked day on the Homeis app since the launch of the platform in 2017, witnessing upwards of 300 percent in traffic spikes. 

It’s High Time We Got a ‘F**k Off’ Economy: Zephyr Teachout

In the 1980s, under the Reagan administration’s lax enforcement of antitrust laws, corporate mergers in the U.S. began to jump. Since then, the market power of America’s biggest corporations has only continued to increase, with this result: A tiny number of companies dominate slews of major industries—from pharmaceuticals and retailers to hospitals and meat processors to defense contractors and social media, to many, many others. This issue was thrown into stark relief during the pandemic when behemoths such as Amazon, Google, Facebook, and Walmart saw their market values skyrocket while smaller companies all over the country went bankrupt.

Zephyr Teachout contends that monopoly is the forgotten issue of our time.

Monopoly, argues the law professor and former New York congressional and gubernatorial candidate, is a key driver of modern society’s biggest problems, such as low wages, income inequality, financial speculation, restrictions to worker freedom, declining entrepreneurship, and racism.

With her new book, Break Em’ Up: Recovering Our Freedom from Big Ag, Big Tech, and Big Money, Teachout seeks to make anti-monopoly a top issue for progressives again. I recently spoke to her by phone about how the Left has missed the monopoly problem, why her book is more about power than economics, and why we need to strive for a “fuck off” economy.

In your introduction, you write that humans have a drive for power that must be checked or tyranny will result. Why did you start like this?

So many questions about politics, power and the economy are really questions about human nature. When we treat Jeff Bezos or Mark Zuckerberg as only about the bottom line, we’re misunderstanding motivations. It’s much more than greed. As I write in the book, these are “William the Conqueror” types. They’re out to accumulate power. We need to confront that if

Why Is The Market So Strong And Economy So Weak?

The continuing strength of the stock market, even as the coronavirus pandemic batters the U.S. economy, has baffled many investors. The Dow Jones Industrial Index fell some 35% in 20 trading days the first three weeks of March as COVID-19 began spreading rapidly globally, but it has since gained nearly 60% to levels above 28,650. At the same time, the Commerce Department reported the U.S. economy shrank 31.7% in the April-June quarter. Part of our job at Equitas is to research many areas of the market and the economy, analyze the current environment, and to search for the investment opportunities. While there are numerous views and theories, in this KnowRisk Report we explore and expand on why the stock market is so strong, while the economy is so weak. We start with Wharton finance professor Itay Goldstein who has boiled it down into two reasons: the long-term prospective of the stock market, and the unprecedented cash infusion of the Federal Reserve. 

The First Reason

Goldstein says at all points in time “the stock market is meant to be forward-looking,” Indeed stocks have risen during seven of the past 12 recessions going back to World War II. “In general, the stock market is a bit different from the economy, in the sense that what you see right now in the economy is what is going on right now” such as production, employment and so forth, he noted. Even in “normal times,” stock prices and economic output would not move in tandem, according to Goldstein. In fact, we may have situations “where the stock prices may predict something that is going to be different from what we see right now.” The S&P 500, for instance, is driven more by manufacturing, while U.S. gross domestic product, the broadest measure of goods and services

Business leaders say global economy faces worst crisis in a century

  • Business leaders from the engagement group Business Twenty (B20) have called for urgent reforms to be made if the global economy is to recover from its worst crisis in a century due to the coronavirus pandemic.
  • “The global economy is in its worst state in a century,” warned Yousef Al-Benyan, chairman of the B20. 
  • B20 proposed 25 recommendations for the G-20 group that fall into three key areas, including empowering people, safeguarding the planet and shaping new frontiers.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Top business leaders around the world say the global economy is experiencing its worst crisis in one hundred years and have called for urgent reforms to be implemented in the G-20 summit hosted by Saudi Arabia in November.

The Business Twenty (B20), an engagement group of high-level CEOs worldwide seeking to represent the business community, put forward 25 policy recommendations on Monday for the meeting of the Group of 20 richest nations next month. These suggested reforms would help put the economy on a strong road to recovery once the pandemic comes to an end, the group said.

Yousef Al-Benyan, chairman of the B20 warned that “the global economy is in its worst state in a century,” adding that “the challenging opportunity is to build back better, with real urgency required from policymakers and business leaders.”

Al-Benyan said, “As the economic recovery evolves over the next couple of years, downside risks remain elevated,” including trade tensions, policy uncertainty, geopolitical strains and building financial vulnerabilities, as countries try to overcome the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

Coronavirus has already claimed over a million lives around the world and has brought the global economy to its knees. In its most recent report, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development(OECD) warned global growth would drop by 4.5% this

Business leaders call for urgent reforms as global economy faces its ‘worst state in a century’

  • On Monday, business leaders under the Business Twenty group made 22 policy recommendations for the G-20 group.
  • Each recommendation fell into three key areas: empowering people, safeguarding the planet and shaping new frontiers.



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Top business leaders say the global economy is facing its worst crisis in a hundred years, and “downside risks remain elevated” unless urgent reforms are enacted during the G-20 summit hosted by Saudi Arabia in November.

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“The global economy is in its worst state in a century,” warned Yousef Al-Benyan, chairman of Business Twenty (B20), a group made up of high-level CEOs from around the world. “The challenging opportunity is to build back better, with real urgency required from policymakers and business leaders,” he added.

Business Twenty is an engagement group that seeks to represent the voice of the global business community across all member states and economic sectors in the Group of 20.

The group is urging G-20 leaders to undertake “bold and broad based” policy action to put the post-pandemic economic recovery on a stronger, more stable growth path. It said trade tensions, policy uncertainty, geopolitical strains and building financial vulnerabilities were key risks to the outlook, as societies and economies navigate the crippling impact of the coronavirus.

“As the economic recovery evolves over the next couple of years, downside risks remain elevated,” Al-Benyan said, raising concern about low productivity growth and rising inequalities. 

“Business has its share of responsibilities to honor and a substantial role to play in building back an economy that is socially inclusive and environmentally sustainable,” he added.

Saudi Arabia will be the first country in the Middle East and North Africa region to host a G-20 summit. The event brings together the leaders of the largest economies of the world to address financial