Apple dropped the price of its EarPods and iPhone power adapters by $10, after it said the iPhone 12 would not ship with these accessories



a close up of a phone: Ubon Ratchathani/Getty Images


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Apple has dropped the price of its EarPods and iPhone wall chargers by $10, after it confirmed that the new iPhones it announced Tuesday would not ship with these accessories.

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Its EarPod headphones — a wired alternative to Apple’s Bluetooth AirPods — are now $19 on the Apple Store, a third less than the previous price. 

Its 20W power adapter, which lets you charge your phone at a plug socket, is also $19 — this is a new product, and down from $29 for the old adapter, which Apple has now discontinued.

Older iPhone models still on sale on the Apple Store, including the iPhone 11, XR, and SE, will also no longer ship with these accessories, the company said.

At its iPhone 12 announcement on Tuesday, the company said that shipping phones without these accessories would let it use smaller boxes, helping it meet its environmental goals.

“It’s like removing 450,000 cars from the road per year,” Apple executive Lisa Jackson said at the launch event.

Read more: Apple has acquired more AI startups than Google, Facebook or any other Big Tech company. Is Apple bulking up in AI or just catching up?

Instead of a wall charger, the iPhone 12 will come with a USB-C to Lightning cable, which can be plugged into a computer or wall adapter for charging.

Other phone-markers have already removed chargers and headphones from their boxes, Ben Wood, chief of research at CCS Insight, told Business Insider, but many more companies will likely follow Apple’s lead.

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Proud Boys Website, Online Store Dropped by Web Host

The Proud Boys, an FBI-designated extremist group with ties to white nationalism, lost its web host for the group’s website and online store following efforts from advocacy group Color of Change.

“After a heads up from Color of Change, we notified one of our customers — a website hoster — who then took action. The websites in question were not Google Cloud customers,” a Google Cloud spokesperson told TheWrap on Friday.

As of Friday evening, however, the extremist group appears to have gotten a new host for its website, but the online store is not currently taking orders and a note to online customers says that the “migration to a new webhost has taken longer than anticipated.”

Also Read: Vice Media CEO Assures Staff That Founder Gavin McInnes, Who Also Launched Proud Boys, Has No Ties to Company Anymore

Still, Rashad Robinson, the president of Color of Change, praised Google for its “actions to block the Proud Boys website and online store” but called on “Google’s peers to follow suit.”

“Big Tech companies have the power and resources to take meaningful action, but instead turn to last-minute, knee-jerk reactions that often fail to prevent further violent harm or even death,” Robinson said in a statement. “When you allow domestic terrorist groups, right-wing militias, and violent hate groups to recruit, organize, and mobilize on your platform, there is no longer a question of whether your company cares about Black people and other marginalized communities — YOU DON’T.”

He added, “Tech companies must enact and enforce a proactive, aggressive approach to stop the violent, hateful activity on its platforms — it cannot continue to fall on advocates, as it has for far too long,” Robinson continued. “Anything short of creating the policies and enforcement mechanisms necessary to proactively keep these hate-fueled groups