Apple bundles free three-month Apple Arcade trial with new device purchases

Anyone who buys a new iPhone, iPad, Mac, iPod touch, or Apple TV after October 22nd gets free three-month trial of Apple Arcade, Apple has announced. Apple’s games subscription service normally costs $4.99 a month, and gives you access to over 100 downloadable games with no ads or in-game purchases.



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© Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge


Apple has long used lengthy free trial periods to advertise its subscription services. When it launched Apple TV Plus last year it gave customers a whole year of the service for free with the purchase of an eligible device, and recently extended these trials by up to three months. Three months is also the standard trial period for Apple Music. Until now, however, Apple has only offered a one month free trial of Apple Arcade with new sign-ups.

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Apple Arcade normally costs $4.99 a month

The company’s year-long Apple TV Plus trial is also continuing this year, Apple says, though 9to5Mac notes that you can’t claim the Apple TV Plus trial again if you already claimed it last year. Both trials must be claimed within three months of activating an eligible device, and only one Apple Arcade trial can be claimed per Family Sharing group. However, each family group allows you to share a trial with up to five people. In both cases, the $4.99 per month subscription enables automatically at the end of the trial period.

Later this year Apple will start offering a new bundle of subscription services called Apple One. This will include subscriptions to Apple Music, Apple TV Plus, Apple Arcade, Apple News Plus, and iCloud storage in bundles ranging in price from $14.95 to $29.95 a month.

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How to send photos or other files on Skype using a computer or mobile device



a woman sitting on a chair: How to send photos or other files on Skype using a computer or mobile device


© Luis Alvarez/Getty Images
How to send photos or other files on Skype using a computer or mobile device

  • You can send any kind of file using Skype on your desktop. On your phone, you can only send photos.
  • To send files on the Skype desktop app, you can simply drag files into the app.
  • Skype has a 300 MB limit on files that can be shared.

Skype makes it easy to share files with your contacts, whether you’re in a chat, conference, or call. On a desktop computer, you can share any kind of file, but if you’re using a phone, your options are more limited.

How to send files on Skype using the desktop app

Open the Skype app and begin a text chat with the person you want to share a file with.

There are two ways to share the file:

  • Find the file on your desktop and drag it into the Skype app. You should see a message in Skype that says “Drop file or contact details to send.” After you drop the file in the app, click the Send message arrow to complete the transfer.



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© Dave Johnson/Business Insider


  • If you prefer, click the “Add Files” icon to the right of the text message field. In the “Open File” window, choose the file you want to send and then click “Open.” Click the “Send message” arrow to complete the transfer.

You can send more than one file at a time, but note that you have a maximum file size limit of 300MB. If you try sending larger files, you will see an error message.

Also, if you are in a video chat or conference meeting, you need to open the chat window to send a file.

How to send files on Skype using the mobile

How An Adobe Employee Made Every Device In The World More Queer (With Just Emojis)

One Adobe employee, with an expertise in fonts, is behind the victory of making perhaps the most universal language in the world–emojis–more gender-inclusive.

Paul D. Hunt is the designer and creator behind the latest gender-inclusive emojis, that are now on nearly every device all over the world.

They are part of the newest set of emojis ‘Unicode 13’ a set of standards released earlier this year by the Unicode Consortium, an organization that sets rules for tech companies using special characters like emoji. 

Hunt is a typeface designer and font developer at Adobe. Still, motivated by personal reasons to make all emoji, more gender-inclusive, they submitted plans to the Unicode Consortium.

“I decided to champion the case for gender-inclusive emoji because, as a queer person, I wanted to provide greater visibility for my fellow gender-nonconforming and non-binary people,” Hunt tells me. “I wanted them to have better options for representing their identity and appearance within the emoji system.”

And the the gender-neutral emoji set, is being rolled out alongside another major gender emoji victory. After multiple representations to the Unicode Consortium over several years, the Transgender flag was also introduced this year.

“As people begin to see a little pink, white and blue flag in friends’ and families’ texts and social media bios, I hope that more and more people will begin to know and acknowledge that some of their loved ones are also transgender”

The global non-profit body has great power and decides international standards for the use of characters. That also means, once a year, they decide what new emojis should become universally published and available on all devices. In one grand

Security firm: WarezTheRemote flaw could turn a Comcast remote into a listening device

Could your cable TV device spy on you? Vulnerability found and patched in Comcast TV remote.

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Security researchers at Guardicore reverse-engineered the firmware update process for a popular Comcast remote to turn the device into a spying tool.

Image: Guardicore

Security firm Guardicore reverse-engineered the firmware update process for Comcast’s XR11 remote to take control of the device. Researchers interrupted the process to turn the voice-control element of the remote into a listening device.

Once the malicious firmware update was in place, researchers used a 16dBi antenna and were able to listen to conversations inside a house from about 65 feet away.

The WarezTheRemote attack could have affected the 18 million remotes in use around the US. After Guardicore disclosed the vulnerability to Comcast, the company developed a fix that was deployed to all units by the end of September. 

SEE: Social engineering: A cheat sheet for business professionals (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

The XR11 has a microphone button to allow users to operate the set-top box with voice commands. The remote communicates with the set-top box over a radio frequency (RF) as opposed to an infra-red connection. As the researchers wrote in the research paper on the vulnerability, “RF enables contact with the remote from afar, which makes for a larger attack surface than a remote control would otherwise have, and the recording capability makes it a high-value target.”

Guardicore described the vulnerability in a new paper published Wednesday, “WarezTheRemote: Turning remotes into listening devices.” Guardicore used a man-in-the-middle attack to exploit remote’s RF communication with the set-top box and over-the-air firmware upgrades. By pushing a malicious firmware image back through the remote, attackers could have used the remote to continuously record audio without requiring any user interaction.

Guardicore researchers put the security threat in context:

“… with so many

‘Smart’ male chastity device vulnerable to locking by hackers: researchers

A security flaw in an internet-connected male chastity device could allow hackers to remotely lock it — leaving users trapped, researchers have warned.

The Cellmate, produced by Chinese firm Qiui, is a cover that clamps on the base of the male genitals with a hardened steel ring, and does not have a physical key or manual override.

The locking mechanism is controlled with a smartphone app via Bluetooth — marketed as both an anti-cheating and a submission sex play device — but security researchers have found multiple flaws that leave it vulnerable to hacking.

“We discovered that remote attackers could prevent the Bluetooth lock from being opened, permanently locking the user in the device. There is no physical unlock,” British security firm Pen Test Partners said Tuesday.

“An angle grinder or other suitable heavy tool would be required to cut the wearer free.”

The firm also found other security flaws in the Cellmate — listed for $189 on Qiui’s website — that could expose sensitive user information such as names, phone numbers, birthdays and location data.

“It wouldn’t take an attacker more than a couple of days to exfiltrate the entire user database and use it for blackmail or phishing,” PTP’s Alex Lomas wrote in their report on the device.

“A number of countries have oppressive laws that may expose users of these types of devices to unwarranted interest from law enforcement and bigots.”

Qiui did not immediately respond to AFP’s request for comment.

PTP said it reached out to Qiui in April this year, identifying the flaws.

Qiui fixed most of the issues by updating the software, but left the older version active and its users still vulnerable, PTP added, saying other researchers had found similar issues.

Such smart sex toys and devices are among the wave of new