Amazon’s ‘Crucible’ Is Officially Dead

Perhaps it was just bad timing. Perhaps if Amazon Game Studios had released Crucible sooner, it would have been a hit.

Or perhaps it was marketing—or the lack thereof—that sunk the quirky competitive shooter, giving it one of the shortest lifespans in AAA game development.

Crucible was released on May 20th of this year, was promptly delisted from Steam in July and returned to Closed Beta status. Now, Amazon is now pulling the proverbial plug on November 9th when servers will officially go dark. That’s not quite half a year.

Then again, maybe Amazon simply shouldn’t have named its competitive shooter after the competitive mode in Destiny 2—a far better, more polished game. Just a thought.

Don’t get me wrong, when I previewed Crucible just before its launch, I actually enjoyed it quite a lot. Not enough to make it a regular part of my gaming repertoire, but enough to recommend it to others (hey it’s free, so why not?)

The “Heart Of Hives” mode, in particular, was quite fun and I do think that if Amazon had focused on that mode alone it might have been a bigger success (along with, you know, actual marketing and what have you). But the game needed work. It needed to be faster and less clunky. The third-person shooting was uninspired despite some characters having some pretty cool powers.

“We’ll be discontinuing development on Crucible,” Relentless Studios wrote in a blog post Friday. “We very much appreciate the way that our fans have rallied around our efforts, and we’ve loved seeing your responses to the changes we’ve made over the last few months, but ultimately we didn’t see a healthy, sustainable future ahead of Crucible.”

It’s weird. Amazon seems to have almost zero clue what it’s doing when

Wizards Of The Coast Responds To Concerns Over Walking Dead Crossover

While Magic: The Gathering’s upcoming collaboration with The Walking Dead features some cool cards, it hasn’t been well received by a large number of Magic fans. In a Twitch stream, Wizards of the Coast has addressed community concerns over the Secret Lair drop, as reported by Dot Esports.

While Magic: The Gathering has done limited crossover sets before, such as the Ponies: The Galloping collaboration with My Little Pony, the sets are usually silver-bordered cards featuring only unique art. The Walking Dead set has been revealed as black-bordered cards that are legal in Eternal formats, with mechanically unique cards that’ll open up new options for play.

Fans aren’t happy that such cards have been released in a limited run set–like other Secret Lair drops, the Walking Dead cards will be printed to demand and then never released again. Other MTG players don’t like the idea of mixing Walking Dead lore with Magic’s already rich and distinct world.

On Magic’s official Twitch channel, Wizards of the Coast’s senior communications Manager Blake Rasmussen was joined by product architect Mark Heggen and director of Magic R&D Aaron Forsythe to talk about the new set, and what Wizards was doing to address fan concerns.

Forsythe talked about the origin of the set, and how it was inspired by internal discussions at WOTC about peeling the world of Magic away from the core mechanics of the game. “There are tons and tons of partners who would make awesome, fun Magic cards, and the Walking Dead was the first one we decided to try this out with.”

“The world is kind of Magic adjacent,” Heggen added. “It’s a world full of zombies and combat. It wasn’t a stretch for us to imagine ‘oh, what would a card would look like?'”

When asked why the Walking Dead

Google’s Daydream VR is Officially Dead

Illustration for article titled Googles Daydream VR Is Officially, Really, Finally Dead

Photo: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo

If you happen to be one of the few people who still use Google’s Daydream VR platform, I’m sorry to tell you that it’s officially dead. (If you didn’t know Daydream was a thing, that’s totally OK. I forgot it was, too.) Spotted by Android Authority, Google recently issued a service update for Daydream letting any lingering users know the software is no longer supported.

“You may still be able to access the service, but it won’t receive any more software or security updates,” said the support page. “The Daydream VR app is no longer supported by Google and may not work properly on some devices running Android 11 or later.”

Some recent reviews on the platform’s Google Play store page show users users having difficulty launching Chrome in Daydream, as well as one confirming that it does not work with the latest Android 11 update. The writing was on the wall long before today, though.

Last October, VentureBeat reported that Google would discontinue support for Daydream starting with the Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL. It also stopped selling the VR headsets the same day, too. The Pixel 3a and Pixel 3a XL shipped without Daydream VR support in May 2019, and Google also removed its Play Movies & TV app Daydream in June 2019. Hulu dropped its support for the platform in September 2019.

“Over time we noticed some clear limitations constraining smartphone VR from being a viable long-term solution,” a Google spokesperson said to VentureBeat. “There also hasn’t been the broad consumer or developer adoption we had hoped, and we’ve seen decreasing usage over time of the Daydream View headset.”

VR that relied on your smartphone always felt sort of gimmicky and dumb from the

The DeanBeat — The Walking Dead: Onslaught creator Survios raises $16.7 million for VR games

Survios has raised $16.7 million to continue building gripping virtual reality games such as the just-launched The Walking Dead: Onslaught.

This is the company’s fourth funding round and is particularly important as the VR industry approaches a new hardware cycle. Facebook is launching the Oculus Quest 2 wireless VR headset on October 13. And the Oculus Link cable will enable you to play PC-based games — like those Survios makes — on the Quest 2.

Facebook is still pumping a lot of money into the VR ecosystem, despite sales falling short of the hyped projections of 2016, when the first generation of VR systems launched. During this time, Oculus and HTC launched multiple rounds of hardware, far exceeding the level of innovation in the console or PC games business. But the bulk of the hardcore gaming revenues stayed on the console and PC side. For the sake of VR stalwarts like Survios, it’s good to see investors are still willing to put money in VR game companies as they grow up into something bigger.

“This is really a ‘Survios grows up’ round,” said CEO Seth Gerson in an interview with GamesBeat. “We have new capital, and we’re adding new talent. The exciting thing is to create some really amazing cross-play experiences using everything we have learned so far in VR.”


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The company has added new executives, including Mike Medrano as vice president of marketing (he worked in Blizzard’s marketing department); TQ Jefferson, the new chief product officer who specializes in taking franchise content and turning it into games; and new studio art director Tate Mosesian, who used to work at Naughty Dog.

The round was led by Irongrey, the investment arm of industrial