Tarrant County launches new website that allows voters to check wait times at county polling locations

Tarrant County voters can cast their ballot at any polling location for the 2020 election. The new website is color-coded based on wait times.

Tarrant County launched a new website, allowing voters to check wait times at county polling locations.

Tarrant County voters can cast their ballot at any polling location for the 2020 election. The new website is color-coded based on wait times.

At one point Tuesday morning, the website showed over an hour-long wait for the Villages of Woodland Springs polling location. That’s one of three early voting locations that was affected after a poll worker tested positive for COVID-19.

The Tarrant County Elections Office said in a statement that they found out about the poll worker’s positive test last night. That worker was trained on Oct. 8.

“Out of an abundance of caution, all workers that were in the same training class were asked to stay home and not show up for work today. This affected three early voting locations: Keller Town Hall, Villages of Woodland Springs and Euless Family Life Senior Center,” said Tarrant County Elections Administrator Heider Garcia. 

The Euless Family Life Senior Center is the only location that remained closed Tuesday morning, Garcia said. Officials are working to find a replacement crew and said they will open it as soon as possible.

Some voters that showed up to Keller Town Hall Tuesday waited hours to cast their vote.

“(The wait) is absolutely worth it,” voter Tricia Priest said. “I’m excited to cast my vote, which I wasn’t

Programming error at the root of Ft. Bend Co.’s early vote issues, says county judge

Fort Bend County will extend early voting hours for the rest of the week in response to issues voters faced on day one.

Ft. Bend Co. DA: ‘Too premature’ to call vote errors as intentional

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On Tuesday morning, polling places got off to a rocky start after reported errors became common at multiple locations.

ABC13 received numerous calls and messages from viewers in the county reporting that they weren’t able to vote. Shortly before 9:15 a.m., a precinct judge at a Missouri City polling place said the issue had been resolved and people were able to begin voting.

SkyEye was over the area in Sugar Land, where people were outside City Hall and Smart Financial Centre.

Still, outside of the event center, Fort Bend County Judge KP George said that for at least one hour there was an error in their program, delaying voting.

“Definitely apologize for that inconvenience, and as I understand, the machines are back,” George said. “The Smart Financial where we are right now, it is up and running. We are back online, and I hope there won’t be any distractions for voting. Once again… I just wanted to say sorry for what happened and we will be doing an investigation. We will be holding those responsible for it accountable. What happened is not OK, not acceptable in Fort Bend County.”

George later released this full statement:

I am extremely disappointed with the technical glitches that riddled Fort Bend County Election machines this morning. Remember, people have died for our right to vote. Stay in line or come back at a convenient time – the future of our country depends on us. You have three weeks to vote early. Remember, we have also extended the hours on the last three days

Investigation underway after programming issue causes widespread voting delays in Fort Bend County

The lines are long for early voting at every polling location in Fort Bend County early Tuesday, but it’s not just because of the increased turnout.

Fort Bend County voters face obstacles as early voting begins Tuesday

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County officials are working to fix a technical glitch that prevented the polls from opening at their scheduled time of 8 a.m. 

County leaders said the machines didn’t have today’s date programmed so they wouldn’t work when the polls opened.

“They were not programmed to start this morning. And that had to be reprogrammed,” Fort Bend County District Attorney Brian Middleton said. 

He said they are investigating whether it was intentional, but said it could be because they’re using “state-of-the-art machines” for only the second time.

The delays came on the first day of early voting.

“I was extremely disappointed with the technical issues,” In a tweet just after 9 a.m., County Judge KP George. “Those who are responsible will be held accountable. In an era voter where suppression is real, I will authorize a full investigation and call for accountability.”

INTERACTIVE MAP: Where you can vote early in Fort Bend County

Many voters from Sugar Land to Missouri City told KHOU 11 they lined up extra early to vote and stood in line for nearly two hours before being told the polls were not opening on time.

Beto O’Rourke tweeted photos of an elderly man with a

Verizon, T-Mobile launch home Internet services powered by 4G LTE networks in rural San Diego County

New 5G networks were supposed to be the battleground where wireless carriers began competing with cable and fiber providers in the home Internet market.

But with ultra-fast 5G not widely available yet, both Verizon and T-Mobile have recently rolled out home Internet services powered by their 4G LTE cellular networks.

These 4G broadband offerings aren’t promising blazing-fast speeds. But they are relatively inexpensive and target more rural areas where sluggish DSL Internet service is common.

Last week, Verizon rolled out LTE Home Internet in rural communities in 48 states. It promises download speeds of 25 megabits per second on average, with upload links at 3 to 5 megabits. It’s unlimited, meaning there are no data usage caps.

Verizon’s LTE Home costs $40 per month for people who are current Verizon Wireless customers, and $60 per month for people who aren’t. Subscribers also need to buy a $240 router, which can be purchased in monthly installments over two years.

“We built this product off of our existing 4G LTE network, and we are offering it in places where we have capacity in our network to support this kind of experience while maintaining the mobile experience that we have,” said Brian Danfield, vice president of Verizon 5G commercialization.

Verizon Wireless is offering home Internet service through its 4G LTE network.

FILE – This June 4, 2014, file photo shows signage at a Verizon Wireless retail store at Downtown Crossing in Boston. Verizon, the nation’s largest wireless provider, reports quarterly financial results on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

(The Associated Press)

LTE Home is available in areas where Verizon doesn’t offer its fiber-optic FiOS Internet service or its millimeter-wave 5G Home product. The company provided a list of zip codes where the service is available, including San Diego County backcountry communities such as Julian, Dulzura, Pala, Valley Center and Warner Springs.

“It

U.S. patchwork of state, county election computer networks still vulnerable to cyberattacks

WASHINGTON — In a little-noticed episode in 2016, an unusual number of voters in Riverside, California, complained that they were turned away at the polls during the primary because their voter registration information had been changed.

The Riverside County district attorney, Mike Hestrin, investigated and determined that the voter records of dozens of people had been tampered with by hackers. Hestrin said this week that federal officials confirmed his suspicions in a private conversation, saying the details were classified.

Last year, a cybersecurity company found a software flaw in Riverside County’s voter registration lookup system, which it believes could have been the source of the breach. The cybersecurity company, RiskIQ, said it was similar to the vulnerability that appears to have allowed hackers — Russian military hackers, U.S. officials have told NBC News — to breach the voter rolls in two Florida counties in 2016.

RiskIQ analysts said they assess that a vulnerability may still exist in Riverside and elsewhere. The only way to know for sure would be to attempt a hack, something they are not authorized to do. The office of the Riverside County Registrar of Voters did not respond to requests for comment.

“I’m very concerned,” Hestrin said. “I think that our current system has numerous vulnerabilities.”

Officials of the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security have said repeatedly that they have not observed a significant effort by Russian state actors to target election infrastructure this year, and Homeland Security’s top cybersecurity official said this will be the “most protected, most secure” election in American history.

Despite government efforts, however, America’s patchwork of state and county election computer networks remains vulnerable to cyberattacks that could cause chaos on Election Day and undermine confidence in a balloting process that is already under significant strain, election security experts