Elon Musk Says SpaceX Closer to Testing Starlink Internet in U.S. After Launch of 60 More Satellites

SpaceX has successfully launched 60 more “Starlink” satellites into orbit as part of its mission to beam high-speed internet back to Earth.

The Elon Musk-led company released multiple videos of the takeoff to social media this morning, which took place at Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 7:29 a.m. EDT. Liftoff yesterday was scrubbed due to unfavorable weather.

Blasted into space onboard a Falcon9 reusable rocket, the satellites will be added to a constellation of satellites that is currently more than 400-strong.

“Falcon 9 launches 60 Starlink satellites to orbit, completing SpaceX‘s 43rd flight of a previously flown rocket booster,” the company tweeted earlier today.

Footage uploaded by the company included the Falcon9’s first stage landing on the “Of Course I Still Love You,” a droneship platform that’s stationed in the Atlantic Ocean. The touchdown happened within 8 minutes and 30 seconds, the clip shows.

SpaceX said on its website that the Starlink satellites cleanly deployed approximately one hour and one minute after liftoff, confirmed by a full video of the launch.

“You can see the Starlink satellites gently floating away from the second stage,” the webcast host was heard commenting during the livestream.

“Shortly, once they have had a chance to space out a little bit, they [the satellites] will deploy their solar arrays and, over the next few days and weeks, they will start to distance themselves using their on-board ion thrusters to make their way to their final operational orbits about 550 kilometers above the Earth’s surface,” the host said.

It was good news for billionaire CEO Musk, who tweeted after the deployment that it meant a beta test of Starlink internet in the U.S. was now closer than ever.

“Once these satellites reach their target position, we will

Dead By Daylight Cross-Progression Is “Closer Than Ever” To Launching

Developer Behaviour Interactive has provided an update on cross-progression for Dead By Daylight, saying the feature is “closer than ever” to launching.

While an exact release date for cross-progression has not been announced, the studio did confirm that the feature will make its way to Google Stadia and PC via Steam.

“The other important feature we have been working on for the past month is cross-progression,” the studio said in a Dead By Daylight update blog post. “In the past couple of months, we have continued developing the cross-progression feature for Steam and Stadia. We are working hard on the final details and we are closer than ever to making it available for all on these two platforms.”

When cross-progression does become available, players can transfer their data between Stadia and Steam through a new website Behaviour developed specifically for the feature. Everything from character progress to purchased or unlocked add-on content will carry over between the two platforms.

Behaviour clarified in a separate blog post that cross-progression is not planned for PlayStation 4 or Xbox One, saying that while it will continue working on it, there’s no guarantee the feature will make its way to other platforms.

“As of today, we cannot make Cross-Progression available on other platforms and we have no guarantee that it will happen. However, we know that this is a community wish, and we will keep trying to make it happen.”

Still, the studio did confirm that cross-progression will come to Nintendo Switch, allowing players to transfer data between all three platforms whenever they want. A release date for cross-progression for Switch has not been announced, but the feature will be coming “in the near future.”

In August, Behaviour released a Dead By Daylight update that made cross-play available on all platforms. Cross-progression is the

China Tech to Face Even Closer Scrutiny From Global Governments

(Bloomberg) — China’s tech companies will face a tougher time globally as digital decoupling accelerates and countries with shared values join forces to promote their technology standards and ethics, according to a report from the Hinrich Foundation.



a circuit board: The Huawei Technologies Co. logo sits on display on an Apple Inc. iPhone in this arranged photograph in London, U.K., on Thursday, July 16, 2020. U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson faces a diplomatic minefield after banning China’s Huawei from the U.K.’s next-generation wireless networks, as Beijing accused him of breaking promises and Donald Trump claimed credit for the prime minister’s decision.


© Bloomberg
The Huawei Technologies Co. logo sits on display on an Apple Inc. iPhone in this arranged photograph in London, U.K., on Thursday, July 16, 2020. U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson faces a diplomatic minefield after banning China’s Huawei from the U.K.’s next-generation wireless networks, as Beijing accused him of breaking promises and Donald Trump claimed credit for the prime minister’s decision.

Moves by the U.S. against companies such as TikTok, WeChat, Huawei Technologies Co. and Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp. are only the beginning of a deeper shift that will also see the European Union and international organizations rethink how they engage with Chinese technology, said the Asia-based foundation set up by U.S. entrepreneur Merle Hinrich.

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Australia, Japan and the U.K. have already followed the U.S. in banning Huawei from 5G networks. India has prohibited more than 100 Chinese apps including the video-sharing platform TikTok.

Read more: ByteDance, Tencent Apps Join TikTok on India’s China Blacklist

In August, the U.S. launched a so-called Clean Network initiative that aims to oust Chinese technology from wireless and digital networks on the grounds that it poses national security threats. The following month, China released its Global Initiative on Data Security that ostensibly calls for global standards for data security, but could also be construed as an attempt to deter others from signing up for Washington’s program.

“These actions have created an existential crisis for Chinese companies, which have come under fire as they are increasingly viewed as de facto proxies of the Chinese Communist Party,” said Alex Capri, a Singapore-based research fellow who